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Poetryelements

Please do not copy without my permission, thank you
by

mskc Potter

on 11 May 2013

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Transcript of Poetryelements

There was an old man from Peru,

Who dreamed he was eating his shoe

He awoke in the night

With a dreadful fright,

And found out that it was quite true.





My father, he sat on a chair,

For sitting he has quite flair.

But the chair it went crack,

He fell flat on his back.

I'd have laughed, but I just didn't dare. Two households, both alike in dignity,

In fair Verona where we lay our scene,

From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,

Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean. I see you driving

round town with the girl I love,

and I’m like: haiku. Poetry is the language of the imagination, of feelings, of emotional self-expression, of high art. What is poetry? A poem begins in delight and ends in wisdom. ~ Robert Frost Poetry is language at its most distilled and most powerful. ~ Rita Dove Genuine poetry can communicate before it is understood. ~ T. S. Eliot Poetry is thoughts that breathe, and words that burn. ~ Thomas Gray Poems can contain: Similes, Metaphors, Personifications, Onomatopoeia, Hyperbole, Symbols, Alliteration, Assonance, & Repetition They can also rhyme 1. It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
2. Can I go forward when my heart is here?
3. Turn back, dull earth, and find thy center out.
4. It was the lark, the herald of the morn;
5. No nightingale. Look, love, what envious streaks. ∪U / U / U / U / U /
Example: O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright Rhyming is the correspondence of sound between words or the endings of words, esp. when these are used at the ends of lines of poetry. Meter is:
The rhythm of a piece of poetry, determined by the number and length of feet in a line. Rhyme Scheme is:
The arrangement of rhymes in a poem or stanza. Mary had a little lamb A (every line ending with a word that rhymes with “lamb”gets an “A”)
Her fleece was white as snow B (does not rhyme with “lamb”)
And everywhere that Mary went C (does not rhyme with “lamb” or “snow”)
The lamb was sure to go B (because “go” rhymes with “snow,” this gets a B)

It followed her to school one day, D (everything that rhymes with “day” gets a D)
Which was against the rules. E (everything that rhymes with “rules” gets a E)
It made the children laugh and play, D
To see a lamb at school E
And so the teacher turned it out F (everything that rhymes with “out” gets an F)
But still it lingered near G (everything that rhymes with “near” gets a G)
And waited patiently about, F
Till Mary did appear G
"Why does the lamb love Mary so?" B (rhymes with “snow” from line 2)
The eager children cry H
"Why, Mary loves the lamb, you know." B
The teacher did reply H Determine the rhyme scheme for this poem:

I have been one acquainted with the night.
I have walked out in rain—and back in rain.
I have outwalked the furthest city light.
I have looked down the saddest city lane.
I have passed by the watchman on his beat
And dropped my eyes, unwilling to explain.
I have stood still and stopped the sound of feet
When far away an interrupted cry
Came over houses from another street,
But not to call me back or say good-by;
And further still at an unearthly height
One luminary clock against the sky
Proclaimed the time was neither wrong nor right.
I have been one acquainted with the night. Check yourself:

I have been one acquainted with the night. A
I have walked out in rain—and back in rain. B
I have outwalked the furthest city light. A
I have looked down the saddest city lane. B
I have passed by the watchman on his beat C
And dropped my eyes, unwilling to explain. B
I have stood still and stopped the sound of feet C
When far away an interrupted cry D
Came over houses from another street, C
But not to call me back or say good-by; D
And further still at an unearthly height A
One luminary clock against the sky D
Proclaimed the time was neither wrong nor right. A
I have been one acquainted with the night. A quatrain – a stanza containing four lines. See if you can determine how many quatrains the lines from Romeo and Juliet on your handout contains couplet – a pair of rhyming lines Dr. Seuss is known for using couplets in his work.
Identify the couplets in "Green Eggs & Ham" as you watch the clip Now let's talk about TYPES of poems you might encounter limerick – a 5-line, rhymed, rhythmic verse, usually humorous Try to write your own limerick now! Haiku:
*3 Lines
* Lines 1,2,3 have 5,7,5 syllables
* Unrhymed Try to write your own Haiku about school! ballad – a song like narrative poem Did you ever wonder why they were called "Rock Ballads?" free verse – poetry with neither regular meter nor rhyme scheme
It's basically anything goes! Slam poetry which is becoming really popular is free verse....like this clip What made that song a ballad? What made that clip of slam poetry free verse? Poetry doesn't have to be scary...it can be fun!
Full transcript