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adgsfgdh

Analysis of Martin Luther King's Speech
by

Sharanniyan Ragavan

on 1 October 2016

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Transcript of adgsfgdh

R.Sharanniyan
Daryl Chan I Have a Dream Introduction
Background
Conventions
Language Introduction Contents I Have a Dream was a public speech by Martin Luther King Jr., delivered to 250,000 civil rights supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

It was considered a defining moment for the American Civil Rights Movement (1955-1968) Target Audience Language-Analysis-Repetition -King's use of word choice, repetition, allusions and metaphors, cultural and political references brought out the essence of the speech

-The intensity of King's speech is built through bold statements and rhythmic repetition

-Each repetition builds on the one before and its reinforced by MLK's passion for his cause

-King had many strategical techniques to grab the attention of his listeners

-Repetition in his speech was used to grab and sustain the listener's attention

-Repeat use of the same phrases caused the emphasis and reinforcement of the points and views that King wanted to bring across and was fighting for A formal speech by
Martin Luther King Jr. Language and Power
- Call for an end to racism in the United States
- Was a message of hope, MLK wished for the blacks and the whites to live together
- He also desired for blacks to have equal rights
- The speech also calls for action to have the civil rights act implemented as a law (leads to the Civil Rights Act of 1964)
- Delivered on August 28, 1963 during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom which was intended to demonstrate mass support for the civil rights legislation proposed by then President John F. Kennedy
-The speech came amidst calls for several reforms of the civil rights in America
-Racism was rife, mainly as a result of the activities of the Ku Klux Klan
-Colored and White people were segregated in many forms of daily life (school, work etc.)
-African Americans were unable to vote freely due to sanctions imposed on the voting process -General public of the United States calling for their support for equality in the nation
-All who were MLK's followers, most wanted equal rights for all American citizens
-Politicians, MLK wanted his speech to be of a major influence to enact a Congress bill for Civil Rights, supported JFK's Civil Rights Address Effect of Repetition Aims Context Effect of Repetition

-"We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim...We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels..."

-"Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina..."

-"Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia, Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee, Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi, from every mountainside, let freedom ring." Allusions -King makes allusions to the Declaration of Independence by citing "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" and "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal."

-He alludes historically to Abraham Lincoln and how, "Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation."

-MLK also uses authoritative appeal through historical allusion when he says, "When the architects of our republic..." he refers to the Founding Fathers of the United States Conventions of the Text Type Simile and metaphors
Extended metaphor
Allusion
Lists of three
Repetition
Parallelism
Redundant questions I HAVE A
DREAM BROTHER AMEN Techniques used in this speech

Repetition
Allusion
Antithesis
Anaphora
Pathos and Ethos
Alliteration
Metaphor
Simile -He also refers to the song of "My Country, 'Tis of Thee" at the line “This will be the day when all God’s children will be able to sing with a new meaning, ‘My country, ‘tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim’s pride, from every mountain side, let freedom ring.”

-By referring to equal black and white people as God’s children, he implies that there will be a great sense of unity in the nation when equality of races is finally established. This is furthered when he says all will sing the American national anthem, reminding people that they all live in the same great nation, and all have the same national pride Antithesis "The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to distrust of all white people..."


Martin Luther King Jr. uses antithesis by describing militancy with the word marvelous. This is an antithesis because usually militancy has a negative outcome. Instead of acknowledging that negativity, however, King describes it as “marvelous.” Anaphora -"We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim...We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels..."

-"Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina..."

-"Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia, Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee, Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi, from every mountainside, let freedom ring."

-"Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice..." Anaphora I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal."
I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.
I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.
I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today.
I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification; one day right there in Alabama, little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.
I have a dream today.
I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together. Effect of Anaphora -Anaphora is the repetition of a phrase at the beginning of a sentence

-Also a form of repetition emphasizes MLK's vision and the ideas that he wishes to put across

-The phrases build up to an emotional climax after which the famous phrase "I have a dream was used by

-The audience finally felt a sense of leadership in changing the nature of society at that time through MLK's deliberating phrases Alliteration "Cash a check" "dark and desolate" "sweltering summer" "marvelous new militancy" "trials and tribulations" Ethos and Pathos Credibility Passion Old Negro spiritual SIMILE "until justice rolls down like waters"
indicating justice to come natural flowing water. "righteousness like a mighty stream"
implying that righteousness is powerful- like a mighty stream. Metaphors: "This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope"

"...seared in the flames of withering injustice"
The injustice of slavery is compared to flames, that burn.

" ...joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity."
The Emancipation Proclamation is seen as a break from years of captivity" ...More Metaphors "This sweltering summer of the Negro's legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality."

"Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred" "With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood" EVEN MORE METAPHORS... "The bank of justice is bankrupt"
"...quicksand of racial injustice"
“...storms of persecutions and staggered by the winds of police brutality.”
"manacles of segregation"
"chains of discrimination"
"a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperty."
"...valley of segregation...path of racial justice"
"the whirlwinds of revolt"
"bright day of justice"
"valley of despair"
"heat of injustice"
"heat of oppression"
"oasis of freedom" METAPHOR GALORE In conclusion Themes Discrimination
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