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Writing an Introduction

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Elizabeth Suchanski

on 8 April 2015

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Transcript of Writing an Introduction

The Hook
Narrow the Focus
Thesis
Example #1
Example #2
Example #3
using a quote...
Example #3
-using a question
Example #1
Example #2
Example #3
- grabs the reader's attention

The first paragraph in an essay which:
- grabs the reader's attentions (a
hook
)
- explains or sets-up the topic (
narrows the focus
)
- presents the
thesis
statement
The Elements of an Introduction
George A. Romero once said that “I expect a zombie to show up on 'Sesame Street' soon, teaching kids to count."
Example #1
Example #2
-using a statistic or fact
While many people have pets, very few have pet zombies.
How many people would love a pet that did more than play fetch and get hair all over?
While many people have pets, very few have pet zombies.

How many people would love a pet that did more than play fetch and get hair all over?

gives reader helpful/necessary info
George A. Romero once said that “I expect a zombie to show up on 'Sesame Street' soon, teaching kids to count."
One sentence that clearly states the main point of the essay.



The surprising truth is that zombies make excellent pets.
Now some people might reject the idea that zombies could be helpful because of the supposed zombie apocalypse. However, most people underestimate the positive effect zombies can have on our society as pets.
In reality, zombies make excellent pets.
Sure pets like dogs, cats, or fish have their place, but they can't match the abilities and helpfulness of the ultimate pet: zombies. It's a myth that people need to worry about zombies taking over the word.
With the threat of a zombie apocalypse out of the way, zombies really do make excellent pets.
sets up the thesis (main point)
acts as a say more to the hook
Topic + opinion or main point about the topic.
While that may seem a little far fetched, rather than scare everyone to death with the though of a zombie apocalypse, zombies can become more helpful to our society. In fact, like a dog or any other pet, they can become "man's best friend."
George A. Romero once said that “I expect a zombie to show up on 'Sesame Street' soon, teaching kids to count."
While that may seem a little far fetched, rather than scare everyone to death with the thought of a zombie apocalypse, zombies can become more helpful to our society. In fact, like a dog or any other pet, they can become "man's best friend."
Now some people might reject the idea that zombies could be helpful because of the supposed zombie apocalypse. However, most people underestimate the positive effect zombies can have on our society as pets.
Sure pets like dogs, cats, or fish have their place, but they can't match the abilities and helpfulness of the ultimate pet: zombies. It's a myth that people need to worry about zombies taking over the world.
While many people have pets, very few have pet zombies.

How many people would love a pet that did more than play fetch and get hair all over?

- introduces the reader to your topic
You can use:
a quote
an anecdote (very short story)
fact/statistic
general statement
a question
See it Another Way
Review the guided notes so you know what to look for in this mini-video.
As we go through the video, remember the following:

Stop and take notes when you see the
Power of the Pause: pause as often as you need to!
Use the rule of 5: write down the ideas in your own words using 5 words or less.
Introductions
By the end of this video, you will understand the elements of an introduction, see examples of introductions, and practice writing hooks for your essay.
You've finished watching!

Last Steps: Write your summary for the video on your note page as well as your HOT question.

Make sure your notes are complete, and submit them to Schoog before you come to class.

If you used a paper copy of the guided notes, take a good quality picture, load them into Notability, and make the picture large enough to fill the page before submitting it.
explains or sets-up the topic
What is an introduction?
Your Turn
Pause the video and write three possible hooks for the essay you are currently working on.
Full transcript