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Copy of Identifying Themes

Lesson targeted at identifying themes in literature and distinguishing between themes and topics.
by

Joanne Paulsen

on 27 February 2013

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Transcript of Copy of Identifying Themes

We will Topic Topics and themes are like icebergs.
Plot is like the water an iceberg floats in. What are we going to learn today? Compare topic, plot and theme. So what is a topic? A topic is the subject matter. It answers
the question: "What is this about?" Topics do not involve opinions. Many times a topic is the title of a piece. A lot of the time a topic is one to two words and is usually a word(s) repeated throughout the text. Examples: love, hate, peace, happiness, etc. What is a theme? A theme deals with the meaning or lesson of a story.
THE MEssage or the moral.
It usually says something about the topic.
Themes always appeal to the emotions/feelings or state an opinion about something.
Themes can be stated or implied. Theme Happiness exists in company. Love is a battlefield. Beauty does not last. Give a topic and a theme from "The Tortoise and the Hare" and the modified story. "The Tortoise and the Hare"


create a plot including characters, settings, and 3 events
identify three possible movie themes
provide two ways you would incorporate or "hide" your themes in the film
explain how your main character might reflect the these underlying themes The Hare and the Tortoise
(modified by Ambrose Bierce)
A Hare, having ridiculed the slow movements of a Tortoise, was challenged by the latter to run a race, a Fox to go to the goal and be the judge. They got off well together, the Hare at the top of her speed, the Tortoise, who had no other intention than making his antagonist exert herself, going very leisurely. After sauntering along for some time he discovered the Hare by the wayside, apparently asleep, and seeing a chance to win pushed on as fast as he could, arriving at the goal hours afterward, suffering from extreme fatigue and claiming the victory.

“Not so,” said the Fox; “the Hare was here long ago, and went back to cheer you on your way.” What is the theme of the modified story? Is there a different topic? Is this a topic or theme? What is the topic? Explain. Theme Create a Shape Poem based on a topic and in the poem incorporate a theme based on the topic. Knowledge is power.

Because you can have a good

job and lots of cash. The Brain Poem Style: Haiku Activity 4: Seventh Grade Activity 3 Activity 2 Activity 1 Discuss how to make these topics themes

Friendship
Hope
Freedom
Childhood
Family With a STATED THEME:
the narrator will say what the THEME of the story is in a sentence or two within the story
look at the beginning and ending of the story
look for repeated statements
if you can support the theme by using details from the story With an IMPLIED THEME:
the narrator does not say what the theme is
pay attention to the plot, character development, setting, and symbols to help identify what lesson can be learned through the story
reread and take notes
no single statement of implied theme is necessarily correct without supporting text evidence
make a conclusion(s) Plot So what is plot? A topic is the subject matter. It answers
the question: "What is this about?" Topics do not involve opinions. Many times a topic is the title of a piece. A lot of the time a topic is one to two words and is usually a word(s) repeated throughout the text. Examples: love, hate, peace, happiness, etc. What is the implied theme of this photo? Example: Actions speak louder than words.
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