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Choose A General Topic

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by

Taylor Hamblin

on 29 August 2016

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Transcript of Choose A General Topic

Social Studies Research
Part I
Finding Interests, Creating Questions, and Research

Think Broadly
Did you receive a topic or can you chose your own?
Research Your Interest or Topic
Ask questions. Find specific information. Group notes by topics and themes. Write citation information.
Begin Designing the Question You Want To Research
Check with A Peer or Teacher
Organizing your research notes
Think of ways to make the topic interest you and be useful to your life.
Why?
How?
Who?
Where?
Should?
When?
What?
Checklist for questions
1. Incorporate your themes and interests into your
question.
2. Does your question require more than a "yes" or
"no"?
3. Does your question require more than a simple
Google search?
4. Can your question be made more specific?
5. Can you think of evidence to support your
question?
Check your peers for
Words that can be specified.
Can the question be answered with a simple "yes" or "no."
What evidence can help answer the question?
Anything else you can think of to make your peer's research question better?
Questions to start when starting a new topic, research, or any type of learning
1. What do I already know about the topic?
2. What methods will I use to learn about the topic?
3. Who am I going to talk to/observe/survey?
4. How will I communicate with these people?
5. What are the biases of my topic?
6. How can I remove or minimize the biases in my topic?
7. What do I expect to discover?
Finding your social interests
Major Social Studies Themes
Religion
Nations
Class
Gender
Race
Civilization
Much, much, much more...
Art
Medicine
Technology
War
Politics
Education
Economics
Geography
Society
Games
Humor
Specific Information to look for:

Names
- Chief Sitting Bull, President Theodore Roosevelt, General Douglas MacArthur)
Dates
-(1776, 18th century, 1700s, mid-1800s)
Events that have a name
-(the Boston Massacre, the Gold Rush, and the Civil War)
Citation information
For Mr. Hamblin's class do not worry about the order of information. All citations need to have:
name of creator
name of artifact
date that it was created.
If you are using a specific page of an artifact, then please write the page number.
Example David Cannadine, The Undivided Past: Humanity Beyond Its Differences (2013), p. 5
Use themes to organize notes. Themes can be anything that helps you group information together.
Simple themes
Complex themes
Evidence that supports an idea. Evidence that does not support an idea.
Type of evidence (photographs, books, newspapers)
Negative statements based on discrimination (racism or sexism).
Positive statements based on bias (Republicans or Democracts describing the benefits of their parties.
Organize by darks and lights
Organize by reds, greens, and purples
Congratulations!
You have become a historical researcher
Full transcript