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If you don't speak up for them, who will?

Learn more about becoming a Certified Ombudsman Volunteer
by

Gretchen Jordan

on 8 June 2014

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Transcript of If you don't speak up for them, who will?

A closer look at the
Long-Term Care Ombudsman program in Oregon

Who’s the typical LTC resident? Like some of us here, they’re a senior--but one who can no longer live independently.
43,000 people.

That’s how many residents live in Oregon’s 2300 licensed LTC facilities. That's the population of Albany!
The Oregon LTCO operates with only 12 paid employees--plus a current cadre of 170 Ombudsmen Volunteers statewide. (Three in Benton & Linn County, eight needed)
Volunteers made most of the 13,000+ facility visits last year, resolving 80% of the issues within three days!
Our Mission Statement says it all!
“to enhance the quality of life; improve the level of care, protect the individual rights and to promote the dignity of each Oregon citizen housed in a LTC facility.”
Certified Ombudsmen are volunteer advocates who provide the crucial ON-THE-GROUND LINK to thousands of LTC residents; who bring our mission statement into a DAILY REALITY for residents across Oregon.
Volunteers work to resolve problems on behalf of residents--to prevent little problems from becoming big ones. They work informally to resolve issues with the LTC facility--or higher as needed--using a continuum of problem solving and advocacy skills.
As human beings? They’re our parents, brothers, sisters, friends, and, probably, at some point--us.
Our highest priority is to protect the individual rights of residents

-to empower them to exercise those rights
-to advocate for what the resident wants--that’s because they have the SAME RIGHTS we do.

These services are FREE and CONFIDENTIAL.
Representing these residents is our mission. We are an independent state agency mandated by both state and federal law, and created by the Older American Act of 1965 in all 50 states.
WE ARE THE ONLY AGENCY UNIQUELY FOCUSED & OPERATING STRICTLY ON BEHALF OF LTC RESIDENTS WITHOUT OBLIGATION to any LTC FACILITY or to any STATE AGENCY REGULATING THEM.
The Oregon Long-Term Care Ombudsman (LTCO) is the ONLY agency uniquely focused on the rights, human dignity, quality of life, safety, and welfare of the elder resident-- volunteers advocate for the residents, investigate concerns, and educate staff and families about resident rights.

Our services are FREE and CONFIDENTIAL.
10,000 people are turning 65 daily.


Without question, We need MORE OMBUDSMEN VOLUNTEERS both NOW AND IN THE FUTURE--

In most areas of the state, we have only half the volunteers we need to effectively represent the resident and protect their rights.
Omdsmudsman?
Omzbuzdsman?
Om * buds * man
(a non-gender term for 'administrative one')

So what can you do?

If you have five minutes - tell someone you know about this program. There are brochures and handouts for you to share.
Have five hours a week?
Volunteer to be an Ombudsman!
Volunteers are problem solvers. They are over 21, can pass a background check, attend the five day training and can give at least five hours a week, mostly during weekday
business hours.
Do you have questions? Ask away!
www.oregon.gov/ltco
Lloyd and Charlie,
Grants Pass
Marlyn, Roseburg
Our State Ombudsman and Advisory Committee Volunteers advocate for Long-Term Care issues in Salem to Legislators, the Governor, and the public.
Mary Jaeger, State Long-Term Care Ombudsman and
Bill Bard, Advisory Committee Chair
Full transcript