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Template: Welcome to Service-Learning

The basics of Service-Learning in higher education for faculty interested in incorporating innovative teaching methods into the classroom. Created by Kelley Standal (University of Idaho) and Beth Ultis (Boise State University)
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Elizabeth Ultis

on 30 November 2011

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Transcript of Template: Welcome to Service-Learning

Welcome to Service-Learning!
Each presentation contains references to additional resources to learn more about service-learning theory, best practices and methodology.
You may click on any of these links as you move through the presentation- the links will open in a new window and you can continue with the presentation at any time.
This presentation is the first in our Service-Learning series, designed to give you a solid foundation in service-learning methods and best practices.
This presentation will guide you through the basics of service-learning:
We are glad you are interested in
Service-Learning!
II.
Service-Learning is Not...

Why not?
Internships/Practicum/Field Experience
Service-Learning
...volunteering, interning, participating in a community service project,
or completing field experience. These are all valuable forms of service,
but they are not service-learning.
V.
Why Use Service-Learning?

"Why Service-Learning?"
(1 minute)
Benefits to Faculty:
Enhanced opportunities for research and publication

More lively class discussions and increased student participation

Greater student retention of course material

Greater student awareness of community and "real world" issues

More innovative approaches to classroom instruction

Greater faculty awareness of community issues
Benefits to Community:
Access to university resources

Opportunities to foster positive relationship opportunities with the university

Awareness-building of community issues, agencies and constituents

Opportunities to contribute to the educational process

Short- and long-term solutions to pressing community needs
http://www.compact.org/wp-content/uploads/resources/downloads/aag.pdf
Benefits to Students:
http://www.gseis.ucla.edu/heri/PDFs/rhowas.pdf
Models of Service-Learning
Service-learning can take many forms, but most service-learning courses fit into the following categories:
III.
What Does Service-Learning
Look Like?

ENGLISH
Students examine the modern-day relevance of Shakespeare by helping elementary school children understand and perform Macbeth
The possibilities
are ENDLESS!
Service-Learning can be connected to any curriculum. Here are just a few examples:
Journalism, Landscape Architecture, and Family & Consumer Sciences students work together to plan and build a community garden
MULTIPLE CLASSES
COLLABORATING
Examples of Service-Learning
Students apply engineering theories and techniques to design products to help individuals with activities of daily living
Discipline based
Problem- or Project-based
Capstone
Community-based action research
Discipline-Based
Students are expected to have a presence in the community throughout the semester and reflect on their experiences on a regular basis, using course content as a basis for their analysis and understanding
Problem- or Project-Based
Students (or teams of students) serve a community agency as consultants working for a client. Students work with community members to understand a particular problem or need.
Capstone Service-Learning
Students draw upon the knowledge they have obtained throughout their academic career and combine it with relevant service work in the community.
Community-Based Action Research
Students, faculty and community members work together to design and implement a research project that addresses a community need. Focus is on community members finding solutions using information from the research.
Example: Students in a Child Development class work with children at youth-focused agencies.
Example: Public Relations students create a PR campaign for a foodbank.
CHEMISTRY
ENGINEERING
Example: Psychology students collaborate with a shelter to survey community attitudes towards homelessness for a city-wide awareness campaign.
For more great examples of service-learning projects around the nation, click here:
Example: Engineering students use design and project management skills to create a product for an individual or community partner.
To view sample syllabi, click here:
Campus Compact:
http://www.compact.org/syllabi/
National Service-Learning Clearinghouse:
http://bit.ly/ih8V4I
Portland State University (video):
California State University (video):
http://bit.ly/eYRL6w
http://bit.ly/gwq0BL
Students collect and test water samples for the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality while learning how to use equipment and understand lab protocol
ART
Students use metalworking techniques to create sculptures to help educate children at Boise Urban Garden School.
Volunteering & Community Service Projects
Are not tied to a course
Generally focus on benefits to community rather than student's learning
Do not include structured reflection
Provide students with work place skills, but do not integrate course content and service
Focus on benefits to learner
Do not generally include structured reflection
Integrates both course content and service experience
Allows students, faculty, community partners, and community members all to benefit from service experience
Offers avenue for structured reflection so students can connect service experiences to course content
Which model do you think would best fit your service-learning course?

(Remember to enter your response on the form you opened earlier)
Stop & Write #3
IV.
What are the Key Components
of Service-Learning?

Service-Learning Best Practices
Guiding Principles for Service-Learning
Adapted under Creative Commons License from CSU Service-Learning Faculty Manual, Fourth Edition; courtesy, The Institute for Learning and Teaching at Colorado State University
http://bit.ly/o953HI
Preparation for the service addresses student training, clarification of responsibilities, and risk management issues.
Students are introduced to the partner agency before the service begins, and are given an orientation to the issues being addressed.
Principles of Good Practice for Combining Service and Learning: A Wingspread Special Report
Academic credit is awarded for the learning gained from the experience, not for the service itself.
The service experience is connected to the course through reflective readings, projects, and class presentations.
Reflection on the service experience is ongoing and includes dialogue about community issues and the need for the service. For example:
Students, faculty and community representatives participate in evaluating the service-learning experience.
Course includes structured reflection.
Course content and service experience are integrated.
Service experience meets a community need.
Relevant Service
Academic Material
Critical Reflection*
Service-Learning
Reflection is thinking about a service experience in order to connect the service experience and the course material. Although one can reflect alone, it is important to share perceptions with others who may have interpreted the experience very differently or made different connections. Learning comes through thinking about what we do, not by just doing, nor by just thinking.
Learn & Serve America: Service-Learning Clearinghouse:
Additional service-learning theory resources:
Community College National Center for Community Engagement:
Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning:
Effective service-learning is intentional and built into the course syllabus. Service is not a one-time experience or an "add-on", but is connected to course content throughout the semester.
*Reflection will be covered in greater detail in "Reflection: Theory and Practical Application"
Successful service-learning experiences address a genuine need in the community, not just the learning needs of the student. The service usually focuses on an underserved population.
Successful service-learning results when students connect the academic material, relevant service experience, and critical reflection to create a more enriching, engaging, and relevant learning experience.
Civic Responsibility
Service experience promotes sense of civic responsibility
Successful service-learning helps students to understand the value and relevance of service and the community issue their service addresses, and to become more engaged citizens in their community
To view sample service-learning syllabi, click here:
http://bit.ly/cYbVvs
http://bit.ly/cUb3hJ
http://bit.ly/caNXPp
http://bit.ly/aZ6hhs
VI.
Planning Service-Learning

During the Semester:
1. Explain service-learning: Help students understand the why, what, and how of service-learning.

2. Guide reflection: Don't "hope" students will make connections, take time to guide them.
3. Monitor progress: Maintain regular contact with community partners.

4. Evaluate & assess: Offer students feedback, measure performance, and assess teaching effectiveness.
Review & References
Before the Semester Begins:
1. Access staff support: Contact Service-Learning staff with questions and for an explanation of services and resources available.
2. Review sample syllabi: Consider learning objectives for the service-learning activity, as well as possible service options.
3. Contact organizations: Discuss course goals and possible projects. Schedule regular contact with your community partners throughout the semester.
4. Design Course: Include reflection and assignments that help evaluate students' learning from the service. Adapt syllabus, assignments, lectures, and class discussions to include links between course theory and service experience.
Interested in developing a
Service-Learning class?
Here's how!
Stop & Write #7
Write down any questions you would like to ask Service-Learning staff.

(Remember to enter your response on the form you opened earlier)
I.
Service Learning is...

Students in a class using service-learning will participate in a service experience related to the course material.
Adapted from the National and Community Service Trust Act
How It Works
Through assignments and class discussions, students critically reflect on the service in order to increase their understanding of course content, gain a broader appreciation of the discipline, and enhance their sense of civic responsibility.
Planning
Reflection
Implementation
Course syllabus is developed and revised to incorporate the service experience into the teaching and learning objectives of the course. For example:
Partner agencies define their needs and are included in planning for the service.
The faculty member becomes acquainted with mission, clientele, location, and student role for each community partner they will work with.
why educators use it,
what service-learning is,
what service-learning is not,
what it looks like,
and how to start.
Service-Learning is a teaching strategy that integrates course content with relevant community service.
(1 minute)
“Service learning is a form of experiential education, deeply rooted in cognitive and developmental psychology, pragmatic philosophy, and democratic theory. It shares a common intellectual history with organizational development and participatory action research".
http://bit.ly/bNYCoj
Reflection activities will help students think critically about course material, community issues, and their role as citizens.
The experiential learning model we know today has been shaped over time by:
"What is Service-Learning?"
Theoretical Foundations of Service-Learning
John Dewey

Kurt Lewin

Jean Piaget

David A. Kolb
Hands-on application that increases the relevance of academic knowledge

Accommodation of different learning styles

Interaction with people of diverse cultures and lifestyles

An increased sense of efficacy and social development

Practical career preparation

Meaningful involvement in the local community

Moral and ethical growth
Morton, K, & Troope, M. (1996). From the margin to the mainstream: Campus Compact's project on integrating service with academic study. Journal of Business Ethics, 15(1), 21-32.
Adapted from Heffernan, K. (2001). Implementation in fundamentals of service learning course construction. Providence, RI: Campus Compact.
Adapted from Eyler, J, & Giles Jr, DE. (1999). Where's the learning in service-learning?. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
Adapted from Bonar, L, Buchanan, R, Fisher, I, & Wechsler, A. (1996). Service-learning in the curriculum: a faculty guide to course development. Salt Lake City, UT: Lowell Bennion Community Service Center.
Benefits of Service-Learning
Additional Reading
http://bit.ly/mjvrhz
Service-Learning Continuum
The chart below offers another perspective on a continuum between volunteerism and internships.
Meredith College. (2005). Service learning as part of civic engagement: Faculty guide to service learning. Unpublished manuscript, Service Learning, Meredith College, Raleigh, NC. Retrieved from
http://www.meredith.edu/academics/servicelearning/facguide_final_draft-1.pdf
(Tanner, 2006)
"Dewey's theory of experiential education also is reflected in other critical service-learning components, such as the construction of learning outcomes, the use of group-based activities in the learning process, the use of "educative" rather than "miseducative" experiences, the reliance on the organic link between what is learned and personal experience, and opportunities for students to learn the value of altruism and personal responsibility."
(Morton & Troope, 1996)
Kraft, R. (1996). Service learning. ______________________, 28, 131-159.
Education & Urban Society
(Kraft, 1996)
Tanner, K. (2006). Service learning: learning by doing and doing what matters. Informally published manuscript, Montana State University, Office for Community Involvement, Bozeman, MT. Retrieved from
http://www.montana.edu/teachlearn/Papers/Service%20learning.pdf
Adapted from Boise State University Service-Learning Program
"Planning to Use Service-Learning: Recommended Steps"
"Learning Objectives"
(1 minute)
"Reflection"
(2 minutes)
(Lewis-Clark State College, 2009)
http://bit.ly/rXjdm9
Additional Reading
"At A Glance: What We Know About The Effects of Service-Learning on College Students, Faculty, Institutions and Communities"
Additional Reading
"How Service Learning Affects Students"
(Boise State University, 2009)
http://bit.ly/twSbO9
(Boise State University, 2009)
http://bit.ly/s5cW18
Bonar, L, Buchanan, R, Fisher, I, & Wechsler, A. (1996). Service-learning in the curriculum: A faculty guide to course development. Salt Lake City, UT: Lowell Bennion Community Service Center.
Morton, K, & Troope, M. (1996). From the margin to the mainstream: Campus Compact's project on integrating service with academic study. Journal of Business Ethics, 15(1), 21-32.
Dewey, J. (1963). Experience and education. New York: Collier Books.
Kolb, D. A. (1984). Experiential learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. Englewood Cliffs, N.J: Prentice-Hall.
Eyler, J, & Giles Jr, DE. (1999). Where's the learning in service-learning?. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
CSU Service-Learning Faculty Manual, Fourth Edition; courtesy, The Institute for Learning and Teaching at Colorado State University.
http://teaching.colostate.edu/guides/servicelearning/
Heffernan, K. (2001). Implementation in fundamentals of service learning course construction. Providence, RI: Campus Compact.
Meredith College. (2005). Service learning as part of civic engagement: Faculty guide to service learning. Informally published manuscript, Service Learning, Meredith College, Raleigh, NC. Retrieved from
http://www.meredith.edu/academics/servicelearning/facguide_final_draft-1.pdf
Tanner, K. (2006). Service learning: learning by doing and doing what matters. Informally published manuscript, Montana State University, Office for Community Involvement, Bozeman, MT. Retrieved from
http://www.montana.edu/teachlearn/Papers/Service%20learning.pdf
Boise State University Service-Learning Program. (2011). Planning to use service-learning: recommended steps. Retrieved from
http://servicelearning.boisestate.edu/faculty/planning.asp
Hurd, C. (2007). The CSU service-learning program's guiding principles. The Institute for Learning and Teaching, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. Retrieved from
http://teaching.colostate.edu/guides/servicelearning/principles_guidingprinciples.cfm
Lewis-Clark State College. (2009). Service-learning at lewis-clark state college. [Web]. Retrieved from
http://www.youtube.com/user/LCServiceCorps#p/a/u/1/Cmx4T0zDXzo
Additional Reading
Service-Learning
Teaching strategy that connects service experience to learning objectives
Uses reflection to help students make connections to course material and to the larger world.
Theory
-Rooted in cognitive and developmental psychology, pragmatic philosophy, and democratic theory.
-Influenced by the theories of John Dewey, Paulo Freire, Jean Piaget, David A. Kolb
Volunteering, Internships & Service-Learning
Volunteering & Community Service: Are not tied to a course, focus on benefits to community rather than student learning, do not include structured reflection.
Internships/Practicum/Field Experience: Focus on work place skills, do not integrate course content and service, focus on learner, do not include structured reflection.
Service-Learning: Integrates course content and service experience, offers benefits to faculty, students, and community partners, uses structured reflection.
Models of Service-Learning
Discipline-based: Students have a presence in the community throughout the semester; use reflection to analyze and understand course content.
Problem or Project-based: Students serve a community agency as “consultants” working for a “client” to understand a particular problem or need.
Capstone: Students draw upon knowledge obtained throughout their academic career and combine it with relevant service work in the community.
Community-Based Action Research: Students, faculty and community members work together on a research project that addresses a community need.
Critical reflection- Course includes structured reflection.
Relevant service- Service experience meets a community need.
Academic material- Course content and service experience are integrated.
Civic responsibility- Service experience promotes sense of civic responsibility
Key Components
Best Practices
Planning: Course syllabus incorporates service experience, partner agencies define needs, faculty gets to know agency partner.
Implementation: Students are oriented to responsibilities, risks, and agency; academic credit award for learning gained rather than service.
Reflection: Service experience connected to course on an ongoing basis through reflective activities; students, faculty and community partners all participate.
Benefits of
Service-Learning
Community: Access to university resources; positive university relationships; awareness-building; short and long-term solutions to community needs.
Faculty: Opportunities for research and publication; increased student participation, retention, and awareness; innovative instruction.
Students: Increased engagement in material, education, and community; course connections to the world outside of the classroom.
Review
References
Adapted under Creative Commons License from CSU Service-Learning Faculty Manual, Fourth Edition; courtesy, The Institute for Learning and Teaching at Colorado State University
http://bit.ly/tnZWGb
http://www.compact.org/wp-content/uploads/resources/downloads/aag.pdf
Additional Reading
"At A Glance: What We Know About The Effects of Service-Learning on College Students, Faculty, Institutions and Communities"
(Boise State University, 2009)
http://bit.ly/uH3HWH
Created by
Kelley Standal (University of Idaho)
Beth Ultis (Boise State University)
Full transcript