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11 Honors English Weekly Agendas

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KT Jones

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Transcript of 11 Honors English Weekly Agendas

Honors English 11 Weekly Agenda
Common Core State Standards for 11&12
Week of 10/21
Mon.

No School
Tues.
Bullying Video
Wed.
Watch 12 Angry Men
Thursday
12 Angry Men writing prompts
What is an allegory?
Friday
Vocabulary practice group work
McCarthyism Prezi
Begin dramatic reading of The Crucible
Student Understanding: Quality drama can make poignant statements about universal experiences with the intent of improving society. An allegory tells two stories: a face-value story on the surface and a message-heavy story below the surface.
CCSS:RL.11-12.7. Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. RI.11-12.8. Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy

Reading: Literature

Key Ideas and Details
• RL.11-12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

• RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

• RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

Craft and Structure
• RL.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

• RL.11-12.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

• RL.11-12.6. Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
• RL.11-12.7. Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

• RL.11-12.9. Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
• RL.11-12.10. By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 11–CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Writing

Text Types and Purposes


W.11-12.1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

• W.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

• W.11-12.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Production and Distribution of Writing
• W.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

• W.11-12.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

• W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge
• W.11-12.7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

• W.11-12.8. Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

• W.11-12.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Range of Writing
• W.11-12.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes

Reading: Informational
Texts

Key Ideas and Details
• RI.11-12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

• RI.11-12.2. Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

• RI.11-12.3. Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.

Craft and Structure
• RI.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

• RI.11-12.5. Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.

• RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
• RI.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.

• RI.11-12.8. Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses).

• RI.11-12.9. Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
• RI.11-12.10. By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 11–CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.


Language

Conventions of Standard English
• L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

• L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Knowledge of Language
• L.11-12.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

• L.11-12.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

• L.11-12.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

• L.11-12.6. Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.


Speaking and Listening

Comprehension and Collaboration
• SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

• SL.11-12.2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.

• SL.11-12.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
• SL.11-12.4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.

• SL.11-12.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

• SL.11-12.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Week 0f 10/28
Mon.
Touchstones
Character Traits & Motivation (What is a crucible?)
Continue dramatic reading of The Crucible
Tues.
Act One pg. 25
Character Sort & Factions Take Sides
Continue dramatic reading of The Crucible
Wed.
Sub. in
Watch Act one from Rocketbook and movie

Thursday
Widening Circle of Witchcraft Accusations
Who is Tituba? Powerpoint
Continue dramatic reading of The Crucible

Friday
No School

Student Understanding: Characterization in a drama is created primarily through what characters say to each other., plot events, and stage directions. Literature can be analyzed through a philosophical lens Quality drama can make poignant statements about universal experiences with the intent of improving society.
CCSS:RL.11-12.7. Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. RI.11-12.8. Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama
Assessment: Sentence marking, discussion, character traits/motivation worksheet, character sort, writing prompts
UDL: diagrams, sorting tags

Monday
Touchstones paragraph for improvement & Genesis discussion
________________________
Tuesday
What is a crucible?
Describe the dramatic changes in tone and social atmosphere that occur in Act 2 as characters come and go. Create a graphic organizer to chart it visually
What new character traits do we learn about: John Proctor? Elizabeth Proctor? Abigail Williams?
Continue dramatic reading of The Crucible up to end of Act 2
What does the rabbit symbolize?

Student Understanding: Characterization in a drama is created primarily through what characters say to each other., plot events, and stage directions.
_______________________________________
Wednesday

Nietzsche fortune cookies,What is Nietzsche's philosophy?
Nihilism Prezi
Writing Prompt: How is Nihilism evident in The Crucible? Look to Act 1&2.

Student Understanding: Literature can be analyzed through a philosophical lens.
________________________________________
Thursday
Vocabulary Practice
Character focus: John Proctor. Find quotes which define John Proctor's character, philosophy, and perspective on the world.
Factor in antihero elements
Continue dramatic reading of The Crucible
Student Understanding: Understanding the protagonist's perspective will point to the author's message
_________________________________________
Friday
Vocabulary Unit 4 Quiz
Writing prompt: Find evidence of Hale's dynamic character and describe it. Find quotations in end of Act 2 to contrast with quotations in the beginning of Act 3.
Movie!
Student Understanding: Dynamic characters transform as a result of conflicts.

CCSS: SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. RL.11-12.7. Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. RI.11-12.8. Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama
Assessment: Sentence marking, discussion, character traits/motivation worksheet, character sort, writing prompts
UDL: graphic organizers



Week of 11/4/2013
cru·ci·ble
: a pot in which metals or other substances are heated to a very high temperature or melted

: a difficult test or challenge

: a place or situation that forces people to change or make difficult decisions

Week of 11/18
Monday
Touchstones
Continue The Crucible movie
HW: Read The Death of the Moth by Virginia Woolf-highlight parts that are beautifully written.
Student Understanding: Although what is aesthetically pleasing varies depending upon individual taste, there are universal standards by which literature can be judged.
Tuesday
Finish The Crucible movie
Beauty in the language of The Crucible
Woolf's The Death of the Moth- What did you like about it? What 's the point? What's the appeal? Was it beautiful?
Aesthetics Prezi
Elements of Literary Style Checklist hand
Read The Death of a Moth by Annie Dillard
Student Understanding: Although what is aesthetically pleasing varies depending upon individual taste, there are universal standards by which literature can be judged.
Wednesday
Ted Talks: http://www.ted.com/talks/steven_strogatz_on_sync.html
Dillard's moth essay HW share out
Concept Comparison for the 2 Moths (tone words list)
Student Understanding: When defining authors' style, describe what is
characteristic
about their use of figurative language, imagery, syntax, and diction.
Thursday
DIDLS
Continue Concept Comparison for the 2 Moths
Argumentative essay prep./Counterclaim development

Student Understanding: Counterclaims in an argument boost Ethos, the credibility of the speaker/writer.
Friday
2 Teams split into speakers and thinkers
Aesthetics Debate
Write argumentative essay (due the Tuesday before break)
Which Moth essay has better literary aesthetics?
Student Understanding:
Assessment: Annotated text, discussion, Concept Comparison chart, debate prep (counterargument), debate
CCSS:SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. RL.11-12.7. Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text
UDL: Read Aloud, Ted Talk, graphic organizer
Materials: Moth texts, concept comparison charts, lit. style checklist, tome words list
Week of 11/25
Monday
Touchstones
Debate debate & tone options
Introductory paragraph drawing
Complete argumentative essay organizer
Finish writing essay for HW (due Tues.)
Student Understanding: The introductory paragraph is the most important part of the academic essay-consider your audience and communicate clearly.
Tuesday
Rubric review and intro. paragraph drawing
Color code Hook, Link, Thesis, Bridge in student examples
Gather materials & write intro. paragraph to Aesthetics essay
Based on literary merit, which of the two "moth" essays is more aesthetically pleasing?

Student Understanding: The introductory paragraph is the most important part of the academic essay, so apply all the necessary components to communicate clearly.
THANKSGIVING!
Assessment: Discussion, essay organizer
CCSS:SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. W.11-12.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.W.11-12.1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
UDL: Intro. paragraph drawing
Materials: Touchstones worksheet, essay organizer
Week of 11/11
Monday
Touchstones Writing Prompt
Touchstones Worksheet 11
Touchstones Discussion
Read The Crucible, Act 3
Is Elizabeth a dynamic character?
HW: Read Miller essay and annotate it (due Friday)
Student Understanding:

Tuesday
Vocab. re-take
Honor Roll Breakfast
Read and annotate
Are You Now or Were You Ever?
Note parallels between The Crucible and Miller's experience.
The timed essay will be to define and give examples of the allegorical nature of the Crucible.
Foreshadowing "That woman will never tell a lie."
Re-read tragic mistake -Out of character
Is Elizabeth dynamic or static?
Finish reading play
Student Understanding: A dynamic character is one who changes their perspective and basic nature as a result of conflict.

Wednesday
Man Sawing Branch cartoon: Who does it represent and why? More than 1 character?
Character Profiles handout:What is the difference between character and personality?
Explain how maintaining and/or sacrificing personal integrity is a theme in The Crucible.
Begin Crucible questions
HW: Read and highlight Miller article to prepare for the essay
Student Understanding: The testing of a character's personal integrity in a universal theme in literature. Quality drama can make poignant statements about universal experiences with the intent of improving society.

Thursday
Friday's timed essay question preview:
Write a 5 paragraph essay that defines the allegorical nature of the Crucible. Draw parallels between Arthur Miller’s personal experience and that of the protagonist in The Crucible. Cite examples from both The Crucible and Are You Now or Were You Ever?
SPF Quote Attribution and 5 Paragraph Essay Essentials refresher
What will your three body paragraphs be focused on?
three
Continue Crucible questions & Essay prep.
HW: Essay Prep! Read and highlight Arthur Miller's article to prepare for the essay. Look for quotes from the play to support your essay
Student Understanding:There are three ways to incorporate direct quotations into sentences: simple attribution, partial attribution, and formal attribution. Good organization is the key to writing an effective essay.

Friday
Timed Essay
Write a 5 paragraph essay that defines the allegorical nature of the Crucible. Draw parallels between Arthur Miller’s personal experience and that of the protagonist in The Crucible. Cite examples from both The Crucible and Are You Now or Were You Ever?

Assessment: Writing prompts, class discussions, annotated text, dramatic reading, reading questions, essay
CCSS:SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. RL.11-12.7. Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. RI.11-12.8. Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama
UDL
Materials: Touchstones worksheets, Miller essay, writing prompt
http://prezi.com/nnzoanjwuqka/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share
Unit Organizers
Week of 12/9
Monday
Touchstones
Snow Day!!
Student Understanding: There are 2 ways to combine two independent clauses of a compound sentence:
I,cI & I;I
Tuesday
: Snow!
Wednesday
Fahrenheit 451 reading quiz tomorrow
Compound Sentence Quiz
SOAPSTone fix-up for H.B.
American Romanticism Prezi
Read The Devil & Tom Walker (Written 1824 , United States declares war on Great Britain 1812)
Analyze satire: What, How, Why
SOAPSTone & DIDLS
Student Understanding:Understanding historical and cultural context is important in analyzing satire.
Thursday
Fahrenheit 451 Reading Check Quiz
Hand in Dialectic Journal
American Romanticism Prezi Continued
Finish The D & T.W. & answer satire questions
SOAPSTone group work
HW: Study SOAPStone handouts for Harrison Bergeron
Student Understanding:Satire uses humor to poke fun at and to shame segments of society.
Friday
Vocab. Unit 5 Quiz? Ready yet?
Harrison Bergeron SOAPSTone Quiz
Fahrenheit 451 Reading Check Quiz
All three quizzes must be taken before Christmas break!
Take out Double Entry Reading Journal
Student written discussion questions for Fahrenheit 451
Write and Pass Warm-up
Literature Circle Discussion
HW: continue reading The Sieve and the Sand. Read up to pg. 141 by January 10th
Student Understanding: Good discussion questions can be answered in a variety of ways and then debated as well.
Assessment:SOAPSTone, reading quiz, discussion, compound sentence quiz, marking sentences
CCSS:L.11-12.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.RL.11-12.6. Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).
UDL: Prezi
Week of 12/16
Monday
Vocab. Unit 5 Quiz
Harrison Bergeron SOAPSTone Quiz
Fahrenheit 451 Reading Check Quiz
All three quizzes must be taken before Christmas break!
Satire in The Devil and Tom Walker
Touchstones
Student Understanding: Find the Why? of satire after finding the What? and How? How?=exaggeration, absurd situations, irony, humor
Tuesday
VOCAB UNIT 5?
Complex Sentence 1A&2A
5 Is of Am. Romanticism
Transcendentalism & Emerson
5 I's in Emerson ?
Test on Emerson & Poe on Friday
Student Understanding: A dependent clause is a group of words that contains a subject and a verb, but it is not a complete thought. Dependent clauses can often be identified by words called dependent markers, which are usually subordinating conjunctions.
Wednesday (SUBSTITUTE)
Discontinue reading Fahrenheit 451 (due to student discontent) Return the novel tomorrow
Study for Unit 5 vocabulary test
Memorize the 5 characteristics of Transcendentalism found on the first page of your Transcendentalism packet
Read Emerson's 2 essays, Self-Reliance & Nature, and do the activities and questions in the margin
Student Understanding: Transcendentalism is a philosophy as much as a literary movement
Thursday
VOCAB UNIT 5?
Self-Reliance & Nature
Romanticism in context
Student Understanding:
Transcendentalism is a philosophy as much as a literary movement
Friday
A Christmas Memory
VOCAB UNIT 5?
Student Understanding: Merry Christmas!
Assessment: marking sentences, Emerson crit. analysis, notes, discussion
CCSSL.11-12.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
UDL:
Materials
Week of 1/2
WELCOME BACK! HAPPY NEW YEAR!
Thursday
Independent project (due Mon. 1/13)
Continue Sentence Proficiency - now, self-paced!
Complex Sentence practice- hand in each sheet for grading before you move on. Master it & you don't have to practice it!
Student Understanding:Literary movements have characteristics which define the society of the time and their preferred artistic aesthetic.
Friday
Independent project (due Mon. 1/13)
Continue independent project-hand in project proposal for approval
Continue self-paced Sentence Proficiency
Student Understanding:Literary movements have characteristics which define the society of the time and their preferred artistic aesthetic.

Assessment-sentence proficiency practice sheets, story questions, project proposal
CCSS-RL.11-12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
UDL-choice of representation and content
Materials-project directions, SP practice sheets
Week of 1/6
Monday
Project reminders
Borrow textbook?
Independent project (due Mon. 1/13)
Self-paced Sentence Proficiency
Student Understanding:Literary movements have characteristics which define the society of the time and their preferred artistic aesthetic.

Tuesday
Independent project (due Mon. 1/13)
Self-paced Sentence Proficiency
Student Understanding:Literary movements have characteristics which define the society of the time and their preferred artistic aesthetic.

Wednesday
Independent project (due Mon. 1/13)
Borrow a textbook?
Self-paced Sentence Proficiency
Student Understanding:Literary movements have characteristics which define the society of the time and their preferred artistic aesthetic.

Thursday
Independent project (due Mon. 1/13)
Complex Sentences 4A together
Compound Complex Sentence formulas and packet
Self-paced Sentence Proficiency
Random.com presentation order
Borrow a textbook?
Student Understanding:Literary movements have characteristics which define the society of the time and their preferred artistic aesthetic.

Friday
Independent project (due Mon. 1/13)
Self-paced Sentence Proficiency
Borrow a textbook?
Student Understanding:Literary movements have characteristics which define the society of the time and their preferred artistic aesthetic.

Assessment: Sentence Proficiency worksheets, individual conferences
CCSS: RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
UDL-choice of representation and content
Materials-project directions, SP practice sheets
Pithy sentences are like sharp nails which force truth upon our memory.

Denis Diderot
In general, even though satire might be humorous and may “make fun”, its purpose is not to entertain and amuse but actually to derive a reaction of contempt from the reader.
contempt

synonym: scorn
: a feeling that someone or something is not worthy of any respect or approval
: a lack of respect for or fear of something that is usually respected or feared

Attack on Socialism?
Create a society with huge inequalities
OR....
Satire

of attacks on socialism?
Plenty of people hate it- irrationally fear it , so they become fear mongers- think anti-socialism extremists.

monger-a person who attempts to stir up or spread something that is usually petty or discreditable (hate monger, war monger)
Exaggerated conversation/debate:
Some people love it.
"Really folks, what's the worst that could happen? Share the wealth."
Some people hate it.
"What if their namby pamby, bleedin' heart ideas about inequality causes them to rise to power? They would keep the strong weak to raise up the less advantaged.

Live free or die, for death is not the worst of evils.
So what is?
New Hampshire State Motto: "Live Free or Die," written in1809 by General John Stark, the state’s most distinguished hero of the Revolutionary War.
Irving satirizes people who present a pious public image as they "sell their soul" for money.
First Marking Period
Week of 3/24
Monday
Student Understanding
Tuesday
Student Understanding
Wednesday
Student Understanding
Thursday
Student Understanding
Friday
Student Understanding
Assessment
CCSS
UDL
Materials
August
September
October
Week of
Monday
Student Understanding
Tuesday
Student Understanding
Wednesday
Student Understanding
Thursday
Student Understanding
Friday
Student Understanding
Assessment
CCSS
UDL
Materials
Week of
Monday
Student Understanding
Tuesday
Student Understanding
Wednesday
Student Understanding
Thursday
Student Understanding
Friday
Student Understanding
Assessment
CCSS
UDL
Materials
Week of
Monday
Student Understanding
Tuesday
Student Understanding
Wednesday
Student Understanding
Thursday
Student Understanding
Friday
Student Understanding
Assessment
CCSS
UDL
Materials
Week of
Monday
Student Understanding
Tuesday
Student Understanding
Wednesday
Student Understanding
Thursday
Student Understanding
Friday
Student Understanding
Assessment
CCSS
UDL
Materials
Week of
Monday
Student Understanding
Tuesday
Student Understanding
Wednesday
Student Understanding
Thursday
Student Understanding
Friday
Student Understanding
Assessment
CCSS
UDL
Materials
Week of
Monday
Student Understanding
Tuesday
Student Understanding
Wednesday
Student Understanding
Thursday
Student Understanding
Friday
Student Understanding
Assessment
CCSS
UDL
Materials
Week of
Monday
Student Understanding
Tuesday
Student Understanding
Wednesday
Student Understanding
Thursday
Student Understanding
Friday
Student Understanding
Assessment
CCSS
UDL
Materials
Week of
Monday
Student Understanding
Tuesday
Student Understanding
Wednesday
Student Understanding
Thursday
Student Understanding
Friday
Student Understanding
Assessment
CCSS
UDL
Materials
Second Marking Period
November
December
January
Mon.
8/26
Week 2 Activities:
1. Touchstones pre-test discussion
2. Vocab. words exceptions
3. Reading pre-test Touchstones & novel (when assigned)
Student Understanding: Every discussion group has to discover its unique dynamics. • CCSS: SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
Materials: Touchstones books, corresponding worksheets, flip recorder, yellow folder set up, index cards, Speaking and Listening rubric Assessment: Speaking and Listening rubric, verbal practice
Tues.
8/27 Essay Pre-test
If time allows continue w/ Unit Org.-tenets, movements, and mindmaps (see Wed. below)
Materials: Video link from Dropbox, question and reading pieces, Prezi video

Wed. Activities: (Launched Patterns Unit #1 map w/ Prezi, fill in map info. up to “tenets” slide)
1. Vocab. exploration of “tenets”
2. Take notes on names and dates of the 10 major literary movements (Jigsaw Frame Notes [slide 16] HW)
3. Groups use previously made mind maps to identify patterns (unit concept) and corresponding tenets
4. View images –identity of early America, name tenets, principles, values
Student Understanding: The major literary movements in American Literature reflect the tenets valued by Americans. • CCSS: RL.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
Materials: blank unit maps, Prezi, mind maps, hard copy of art , Frame Notes double sided slide 16 Assessment:
Thurs. Activities:
1. HW to be presented tomorrow
2. Before reading: recall art related tenets & teacher model reading for meaning
3. Notes on characteristics
4. Choose top American characteristic unique to Americans
5. Quick write: define a pattern of behavior an American typically falls into, and name the characteristic/s that drives it.
6. Begin reading What is an American while annotating the text for confusions and discussion-worthy comments
Student Understanding: The definition of what it is to be an American differs according to historical time periods. • CCSS: RL.11-12.9. Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, RI.11-12.4.; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text. RL.11-12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Materials: writing prompt Assessment: annotation, discussion, writing prompt
Fri. Activities:
1. HW presentations (notes handout)
2. Continue reading: What is an American w/text & annotate for discussion topics and confusions
3. After reading: discuss each paragraph
4. (Great Written Answers reg. 11 only) and Quote Attribution Prezis (Frame Routine worksheet for notes)
5. Summative Writing task: Summarize What is an American and name 2 major tenets addressed in Crev’s definition. Back them up with 3 direct quotations from the text. Use the three quote attribution types: SPF
Student Understanding: The definition of what it is to be an American differs according to historical time periods. • CCSS: RL.11-12.9. Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, RI.11-12.4.; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text. RL.11-12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Materials: writing prompt Assessment: annotation, discussion, writing prompt

Tues
9/3
Week 3 Activities:
1. Touchstones
2. Finish What is An American w/ attention to rhetoric (emotional appeals, antithesis, imagery)
3. Review Quote Attribution Prezis (Frame Routine “SO what? part)
4. Close Read Questions worksheet w/ SPF answers
Student Understanding: Every discussion group has to discover its unique dynamics. Authors use rhetorical devices to communicate their message more effectively. CCSS: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively RL.11-12.9. Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, RI.11-12.4.; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text. RL.11-12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Materials: Touchstones worksheet, Close Read Questions worksheet Assessment: discussion, close read questions
Wed.
9/4 Activities:
1. Review SPF Prezi
2. 3Stations
• SPF sorting examples of quote attribution #1
• “” “” #2
• Vocab. matchup
3. Summative Writing task: Summarize What is an American and name 2 major tenets addressed in Crev’s definition. Back them up with 3 direct quotations from the text. Use the three quote attribution types: SPF.
Student Understanding: Authors use rhetorical devices to communicate their message more effectively. CCSS: RL.11-12.9. Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, RI.11-12.4.; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text. RL.11-12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Materials: writing prompt, Lacks book Assessment: stations, discussion, writing prompts,
Thurs.
9/5 Activities:
1. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks: launch
http://www.radiolab.org/2010/may/17/henriettas-tumor/
Prezi and Prezi Notes
2. He La questions
2. Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God
3. Puritan Ethics Power Point
4. Dramatic Reading
5. Rhetorical Devices Power Point
6. Search for rhetoric in Sinners.
7. Vocab. practice (If Time)
Student Understanding: • CCSS: RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text. RL.11-12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Materials: HeLa questions, Sinners, rhetoric list Assessment: rhetoric search
Fri.9/6 Activities:
1. Vocab. Quiz
2. Rhetoric in Sinners
3. Patrick Henry Speech in the Virginia Convention
4. Audience/historical lens- Painting
5. Listen to AUDIO
6. Journalism exit ticket
Student Understanding: CCSS: RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text. RL.11-12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Materials: Assessment: vocab., tenets, rhetoric search
Activities:
Student Understanding: CCSS:
Materials: Assessment:

Mon.9/9
Week 4 Activities:
1. Touchstones
2. Unit Organizer: social behaviors and question #1
3. Compare tenets, Am. characteristics of three works read so far-point to social behavior
4. Aristotle’s Triangle of Communication
5. Blank triangle w/ context oval & OWL PPt. slide
Student Understanding: CCSS: RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.
Materials: touchstones worksheet 3, Aristotle’s triangle handout, blank triangle Assessment: discussion,
Tues.
9/10 Activities:
1. Vocab. retake/SSR
2. Speech in the VA Convention Facts vs. Rhetoric, Chart reasons to fight-logic or emotion?
Student Understanding: Critical readers separate facts from rhetoric when evaluating a text. CCSS: RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.
Materials: fact vs. reason worksheet Assessment: fact vs. rhetoric
Wed.
9/11 Activities:
Reminders-Next Week: Skloot Discussion Monday (Sticky Notes!), Vocab test for Unit 2 on Fri.
1. Note to Next Semester: How to id rhet. style, hardest part, 1-5 rate ability
2. Speech in the VA Convention Facts vs. Rhetoric, Chart reasons to fight-logic or emotion?
Student Understanding:
Authors use rhetorical devices to communicate their message more effectively. • CCSS: RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.
Materials: Assessment: group work, essay
Thurs.
9/12 Activities:
1. Syria & Putin vs. Obama
2. Prezi Unit Organizer-Rhetorocal Triangle
3. Rhetorical Devices Practice Quiz (Aristotle)
4. Summative Writing Prompt preview
5. Finish Speech to VA Convention
6. Study or Read
Student Understanding:
Authors use rhetorical devices to communicate their message more effectively. CCSS: RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.
Materials: practice quiz, prompt Assessment: practice quiz, discussion
Fri.
9/13 Activities:
1. Summative Writing Prompt
2. SSR
Student Understanding:
Authors use rhetorical devices to communicate their message more effectively. CCSS: RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.
Materials: prompt Assessment: prompt

Mon.
9/16
WEEK 5 Activities:
1. Literature circles
• Verbally share assigned answers
• Develop 1 quality (requires thought and an in-depth answer) question for another group, write on paper, switch(1&3-interpret question & brainstorm, 2&4 word & write answer, vote on who should present
2. Touchstones
3. Vocabulary group work (if time allows)
Student Understanding: Good discussion questions are controversial and debatable. CCSS: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively
Materials: Touchstones worksheet, group tags and directions Assessment: group work questions and answer, discussion
Tues.
9/17 Activities:
1. Reading Encouragement and Strategies
2. Read Civil Disobedience and annotate for main points and logic
3. Check while students do vocab. or read He La
4. Paragraph assigned to 3 groups
Student Understanding: Critical readers should weigh the credibility and reasoning of an author as they decide to agree or disagree. CCSS: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively
Materials: Civil Disobedience excerpt handout, debate worksheet Assessment: group annotation, group discussion
Wed.
9/18 Activities:
1. Groups send 2 experts to other groups to explain
2. 1 representative from each group shows annotations on Smart board
3. (Quiz based on presentations tomorrow?)
4. Class splits in two for debate –Find three main points of support or contention based on assigned opinion ARE(assertion, reason, evidence)
Student Understanding: Critical readers should weigh the credibility and reasoning of an author as they decide to agree or disagree. VOCAB TEST. FRI. • CCSS: : Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively
Materials: none Assessment: group work, debate
Thurs.
9/19
Activities:
1. ARE (assertion, reason, evidence)
2. Continued: Class splits in two for debate prep –Find three main points of support or contention based on assigned opinion
3. Debate Thoreau
4. Vocab. and SSR
Student Understanding: There are 5 requirements for every sentence and 4 formulas for simple sentences.
PENS MARK is an acronym representing the steps of a sentence writing strategy. VOCAB. TOMORROW! • CCSS: L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, and punctuation when writing. RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
Materials: SF practice sheets, Teenage Wasteland text Assessment: SF practice sheets, verbal practice,
Fri.
9/20
Activities:
1. Vocabulary Quiz
2. SSR
Student Understanding: Imposters, prepositional phrases and infinitives, trick you into thinking they are the subject or the verb of the sentence. CCSS: : L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, and punctuation when writing.
Materials: SF practice sheets Assessment: SF practice sheets, verbal practice,

Mon.
9/23 Activities:
1. Touchstones: question starters
2. Anchor Activity: SSR Teenage Wasteland, double entry journal for patterns of behavior, foreshadowing of rebellion, and cause/fault/blame
Student Understanding: CCSS: L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, and punctuation when writing.
Materials: question starters, Sentence Strategy Folders, Anchor Chart, Double Journal entry, Teenage wasteland Assessment:
Tues. & Wed.
9/24 Activities:
1. Sentence Fundamentals review: types of verbs-mind/body action & state of being, PENS MARK and Imposters
2. Sentence Proficiency: Cue Cards
3. Learning Sheets 6A
4. Anchor Activity: SSR Teenage Wasteland, double entry journal for patterns of behavior, foreshadowing of rebellion, and cause/fault/blame
Student Understanding: PENS and MARK are acronyms representing our sentence writing strategy. CCSS: L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, and punctuation when writing.
Materials: Assessment:
Wed. 9/25
Activities:
1. Henrietta Lacks Presentation Assignment
2. Learning Sheets 8A
3. Anchor Activity: SSR Teenage Wasteland, double entry journal for patterns of behavior, foreshadowing of rebellion, and cause/fault/blame
Student Understanding: Imposters trick us into thinking they are the verb and the subject of a sentence. • CCSS: L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, and punctuation when writing.
Materials: Assessment:
Thurs.
9/26 Activities:
1. SF 11A
2. Groups: list basic plot events
3. Discussion: causes & blame in Teenage Wasteland
4. Discussion: Ambiguous ending means something! See S. U.
5. Pairs develop interpretation of ending & create poster
Student Understanding: Ambiguity in a text is a sign to make inferences, read into figurative language, and notice what is NOT said. CCSS: 11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful RI.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem
Materials: markers, paper Assessment: pair work, discussion
Fri. 9/27 Activities:
1. Vocab. Unit 3 practice activities due
2. SF 14A, 17A
3. Finish posters and present
4. examples of rebellion in lyrics and story
5. Rebellion Essay Prewriting
Student Understanding: CCSS: 1-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful:.RI.11-12.8. Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning
Materials: lyrics, essay worksheet Assessment: posters, discussion

Mon.
9/23 Activities:
1. Touchstones: question starters
2. Anchor Activity: SSR Teenage Wasteland, double entry journal for patterns of behavior, foreshadowing of rebellion, and cause/fault/blame
Student Understanding: CCSS: L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, and punctuation when writing.
Materials: question starters, Sentence Strategy Folders, Anchor Chart, Double Journal entry, Teenage wasteland Assessment:
Tues. & Wed.
9/24 Activities:
1. Sentence Fundamentals review: types of verbs-mind/body action & state of being, PENS MARK and Imposters
2. Sentence Proficiency: Cue Cards
3. Learning Sheets 6A
4. Anchor Activity: SSR Teenage Wasteland, double entry journal for patterns of behavior, foreshadowing of rebellion, and cause/fault/blame
Student Understanding: PENS and MARK are acronyms representing our sentence writing strategy. CCSS: L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, and punctuation when writing.
Materials: Assessment:
Wed. 9/25
Activities:
1. Henrietta Lacks Presentation Assignment
2. Learning Sheets 8A
3. Anchor Activity: SSR Teenage Wasteland, double entry journal for patterns of behavior, foreshadowing of rebellion, and cause/fault/blame
Student Understanding: Imposters trick us into thinking they are the verb and the subject of a sentence. • CCSS: L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, and punctuation when writing.
Materials: Assessment:
Thurs.
9/26 Activities:
1. SF 11A
2. Groups: list basic plot events
3. Discussion: causes & blame in Teenage Wasteland
4. Discussion: Ambiguous ending means something! See S. U.
5. Pairs develop interpretation of ending & create poster
Student Understanding: Ambiguity in a text is a sign to make inferences, read into figurative language, and notice what is NOT said. CCSS: 11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful RI.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem
Materials: markers, paper Assessment: pair work, discussion
Fri. 9/27 Activities:
1. Vocab. Unit 3 practice activities due
2. SF 14A, 17A
3. Finish posters and present
4. examples of rebellion in lyrics and story
5. Rebellion Essay Prewriting
Student Understanding: CCSS: 1-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful:.RI.11-12.8. Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning
Materials: lyrics, essay worksheet Assessment: posters, discussion

Mon.
10/7 Activities:
• Last Presentations
• Touchstones
• Write essay
• Writing conferences
HW: essay due Wed. (typed or written with skipped lines)
Student Understanding:
• The standard 5 paragraph essay is an academic structure for presenting organized ideas.
o The definition of rebellion varies depending on context. CCSS: .11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. SL.11-12.4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks
Materials: touchstones books Assessment: presentations, essay conferences, discussion
Tues.
10/8 Activities:
• Sentence Proficiency Lesson 1: SS/LS/1A
• Iroquois Constitution vs. US Constitution
• Constitutional rights violations?
• American Dream reflected in Constitution?
HW: essay due Wed. (typed or written with skipped lines)
Student Understanding: The language and format of the US Constitution is partially inspired by Native American Indian legal documents.
Issues surrounding Constitutional rights are evident in modern life and literature. CCSS: L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking RI.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visualy, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.
Materials: concept comparison, group folders Assessment: group work , concept comparison charts
Wed.
Activities:
Student Understanding: • CCSS:
Materials: Assessment:
Thurs.
Activities:
Student Understanding: CCSS:
Materials: Assessment:
Fri.
Activities:
Student Understanding: CCSS:
Materials: Assessment:

Honors
Honors
Week of 1/13
Monday
Touchstones- class choice
Compound-Complex Review
Independent project (due Tues. 21st)
Self-paced Sentence Proficiency
Borrow a textbook?
Student Understanding:Literary movements have characteristics which define the society of the time and their preferred artistic aesthetic.


Tuesday
Sentence sort
Independent project (due Tues. 21st)

Borrow a textbook?
Student Understanding:Literary movements have characteristics which define the society of the time and their preferred artistic aesthetic.

Wednesday
Write 12 sentences to demonstrate sentence variety
Independent project (due Tues. 21st)
Continue working on Independent project
Borrow a textbook?
Student Understanding:Literary movements have characteristics which define the society of the time and their preferred artistic aesthetic.

Assessment: Sentence Proficiency worksheets,sentence variety assignment
CCSS: RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
UDL-choice of representation and content
Materials-project directions, SP practice sheets
Independent Project for Honors English 11 (due Mon. 1/13)
1. Write a speech to present information about an American literary movement of your choosing and the representative authors you become an expert on.
a. Your presentation should provide a
description of the literary movement including the historical and social context
.
b. Each of 4 self-selected pieces of literature should be described using
summarization of content, author & style, and characteristics common to the literary movement they belong to
.
c. During your presentation, read aloud an excerpt (at least ¼ of a page) from one of your 4 featured pieces, and
explain how the excerpt illustrates the literary movement
.
2. Explore the various movements in American Literature which are organized chronologically in the text book. Choose one.
a. Choose representative authors of the period. Try to find variety- male & female, fiction & nonfiction. Read a 1.)short, 2.)medium, and 3.)long selection from the period you chose and a 4.)poem too.
b. Answer the end-of-story questions for each of your 4 choices
3. Hand in:
i. 4 end-of-story questions answered in complete sentences
ii. Index cards for written speech including the
red
elements above
4. The informative speech should be formal in tone and appear to be practiced. Glance at the cards and make eye contact with the class.

Independent Project
End-of-story questions answered in full sentences
Long piece
Medium piece
Short piece
Poem
Description of the literary movement including the historical and social context
Title
Author
Summary
SOAPSTone and/or Style
Characteristics common to the literary movement
Title
Author
Summary
SOAPSTone and/or Style
Characteristics common to the literary movement
Title
Author
Summary
SOAPSTone and/or Style
Characteristics common to the literary movement
Title
Author
Summary
SOAPSTone and/or Style
Characteristics common to the literary movement
Long piece
Short piece
Medium piece
Poem
Page and line numbers for excerpt to be read aloud
Explanation of how the excerpt illustrates the literary movement
Read excerpt
Introduction
Independent Project Directions
What should I hand in?
Week of 1/21 &1/27
Thursday
Presentations of Independent Projects
Student Understanding:Literary movements have characteristics which define the society of the time and their preferred artistic aesthetic.

Friday
Collect borrowed textbooks
Presentation of Independent Projects continued
Student Understanding:Literary movements have characteristics which define the society of the time and their preferred artistic aesthetic.

Monday
Finish Independent Projects
Improve essays
Touchstones?
Streetcar Named Desire? If time allows.
Student Understanding:Literary movements have characteristics which define the society of the time and their preferred artistic aesthetic.

Tuesday
Improve essays
Touchstones
Assessment: Independent Projects, Argumentative essay improvements
CCSS: RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
UDL-choice of representation and content
Materials-project directions, SP practice sheets
Full transcript