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Copy of Action Research

a very brief introduction
by

Fouada Hamzeh

on 10 August 2014

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Transcript of Copy of Action Research

collective
collaborative
critical
cyclical
KURT LEWIN
DONALD SCHON
KEMMIS & McTAGGART
ACTION RESEARCH
"Action research is simply a form of self-reflective inquiry undertaken by participants in social situations in order to improve the rationality and justice of their own practices, their understanding of these practices, and the situations in which the practices are carried out" (Carr and Kemmis, 1986, p. 162).
community based action research
geographical
political
common condition
reflective practice
learning organization
single & double loop learning
teachers as researchers
improvement of professional practice
structural organizational change

Focusing on individual practice
Problem solving
Contextualized, small-scale and local
Includes Partnerships
Evaluative and reflective
Aims to bring about change
Changes are based on the collection of data which provides impetus for change
Cyclical
5 Phases of Action Research

1. Philosophical and personal stances
2. Finding a focus
3. Collecting data or information
4. Organizing the data
5. Analyzing and interpreting the data
6. Taking action

Exploring
Identifying
Planning
Collecting data
Analyzing/reflecting
Hypothesizing/speculating
Intervening
Observing
Reporting
Writing
Presenting

Processes of carrying out action research
Types of Action Research
Traditional/post-positivist
Practical/pragmatic
Responsive/constructivist
Transformative/social constructionist
Emancipatory/critical
Participatory AR
Learning Goals
Participants will be able to identify and describe the core elements of the Action Research cycle
Participants will engage in a basic action research project
Advantages & Challenges
Rigor
in action research
Quality, validity, accuracy, and credibility of action research and its findings.

Determination of rigor often depends on intended audience for sharing results.

Methods of providing rigor in action research
Repetition of the cycle
Prolonged engagement and persistent observation
Experience with the process
Triangulation of data
Member checking
Participant debriefing


A method of qualitative research the purpose of which is to engage in problem solving through a cyclical process of thinking, acting, data gathering and reflection (Savin-Baden and Major, 2013, p. 245).
"Sometimes known as
"Action Inquiry"
- An umbrella term for deliberate use of any kind of a
plan
,
act
,
describe
,
review
cycle for inquiry into a field of practice."
(Phillips et al. 2000, p. 3.1)
Berg, B. L., & Lune, H. (2012).
Qualitative research methods for the social sciences
. New York: Pearson.
Canadian Journal of Action Research: http://cjar.nipissingu.ca/index.php/cjar OR Ontario Action Researcher: http://oar.nipissingu.ca/index.htm
Carr, W. & Kemmis, S. (1986).
Becoming critical: Education, knowledge and action research
. London: Falmer.
Ontario Action Researcher.
Frazer, D., Gehan, K., Mills, A., & Smart, C. (2003). … pearls of wisdom: Action Research in an indigenous context - working together to make things better, unpublished report.
Kemmis, S. & Wilkinson, M. (1998). Participatory action research and the study of practice. In Atweh, B., Kemmis, S., & Weeks, P. (1998). Action research in practice: Partnerships for social justice in education. London: Routledge.
Philips, R. A., Bain, J., McNaught, C., Rice, M., & Tripp, D. (2000).
Handbook for the evaluation of computer-facilitated learning projects in higher education.
Perth, Western Australia: Murdoch University. Retrieved from: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/12141/1/handbook.pdf
Savin-Baden, M. & Howell Major, C. (2013)
Qualitative Research: The essential guide to theory and practice
. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge
Winter, R. (1996).
Some Principles and Procedures for the Conduct of Action Research,
in New Directions in Action Research, ed. Ortrun Zuber-Skerritt. London: Falmer Press.

References/Resources
Move Organisational Learning. (2014).
Action research by Kurt Lewin (1946).
Retrieved from: http://www.movelearning.com/images/Linkedpdf/Toolkit/ActionLearningLewin.gif
Savin-Baden & Howell Major (2013) pp. 246-248
What is Action Research?
4 Cs
Features of Action Research

Other Definitions
Bachman’s action research spiral



Action Research Cycle
Participatory Action Research Cycle
Action Research Induction Kit (2008, p.8-11).
But wait...there's more...
You have all been part of the first phase of a Collaborative Action Research project...
Our Action Research Questions:
1. Do education doctoral students in different streams select or assume different roles within group tasks?
2. When collocated, do group decisions on process influence the choices of other groups?
3. How do novice researchers from diverse backgrounds approach the task of selecting an action research question?
Examining our project...
- What step in the cycle do you think we got to?
- What type of AR do you think we were doing?
- What might the next steps be?
- PAR?
- Reporting?
Underlying Assumptions of AR

Educators are intelligent, inquiring individuals with important expertise and experiences that are central to the improvement of education practice.
By contributing to or formulating their own questions, and by collecting the data to answer these questions, educators grow professionally.
Educators are motivated to use more effective practices when they are continuously investigating the results of their actions in the classroom.
(National Education Association, 2002)
Data Collection in Action Research
Flexible and emergent
No fixed methods - depends on question & philosophy
Cycle provides
general
guidance
Continuous, iterative data collection & analysis; stakeholder discussions
Writing: tends to be 3rd person, objective but varies by researcher & approach
How much do I know...?
Intro to Action Research
Pearls of wisdom
What do I know now...

P
articipate at a practical level
E
xplain situations and issues using real and practical examples
A
lways be aware of your influence and impact on other people and processes
R
ushing things will lose people and their support
L
isten well, hard and long
S
et out to build confidence and trust
O
ut with all jargon
F
ind ways to identify small wins
W
restle with the hard questions - but be realistic
I
nvent ways and have fun collecting information and data
S
trength based approaches will engage people
D
on’t miss an opportunity to celebrate
O
ffer opportunities for story telling
M
ake time to think and reflect
(Frazer et al., 2003)
http://goo.gl/17A9AL
http://goo.gl/QOrrOM
Go to:
https://my.lecturetools.com/
Email address:
demo9747
Leave password
blank
Select
Enter my first course
Select
DS1 Action Research Workshop Pre-test
Go to:
https://my.lecturetools.com/
Email address:
demo9747
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blank
Select
Enter my first course
Select
DS1 Action Research Workshop Post-test
Full transcript