Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Punctuation!

No description
by

Hailey Kiser

on 21 March 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Punctuation!

Commas are VERY IMPORTANT! Commas are VERY IMPORTANT! Let's eat grandpa!
Let's eat, grandpa! Punctuation can change everything. Use a comma to separate the elements in a series (three or more things), including the last two. Use a comma + a little conjunction (and, but, for, nor, yet, or, so) to connect two independent clauses. Use a comma to set off introductory elements. Use a comma to separate coordinate adjectives. Use a comma to set off quoted elements. Use commas to set off phrases that express contrast. Use a comma to avoid confusion. Make me a sandwich.
Make me a sandwich?
Make me a sandwich!
Make me a "sandwich". Make me a sandwich.
Make me a sandwich?
Make me a sandwich!
Make me a "sandwich". Correct!

Lady Jacks, off to hot start in conference. Which is correctly using quotations?

"Selling" quality meat.
Selling "quality" meat.
Selling quality "meat".
Selling quality meat. When to use quotations correctly.

When directly quoting someone.
Quoting a phrase.
Quote in context.
To set off dialog. Use a period at the end of a sentence that makes a statement.
Use a question mark after direct questions.
Now and then we may use an exclamation point at the end of a sentence to express strong emotion.
Full transcript