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HOW MUCH ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT IS THERE ON BOX HILL

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Danny Cloke

on 12 February 2015

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Transcript of HOW MUCH ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT IS THERE ON BOX HILL

LIMITATIONS
BY DANNY CLOKE
We had planned to do an infiltration test to measure the speed to which water enters soil showing levels of compaction but the National Trust had banned these experiments due to damage to the environment from erosion.

The weather impacted the experiments on Box Hill. The rain was torrential all day and our results would have been very different if the project was on Sunday as it was a lovely day on Sunday and as it was a weekend there would have been many more people. Because of the cold and the excessive rain our results may have been slightly inaccurate. The chart may have been different for other days as it was a week day on a rainy day in October rather than in the summer. For example the soil pin may have gone in a lot further as it was a rainy day.

HYPOTHESIS

My aim was to find out how tourism has impacted the Box Hill site.We achieved this by studying the amount of dog fouling, litter, noise, air quailty, vandalism and space and rating them as shown in the graphs.Then we did an experiment on the amounts of different species of plants in a quadrant. The other experiment we did was to see how deep the soil was.
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT
Prospective School Eastbourne College
EXPLANATION OF RESULTS
Looking at my results I can see that my hypothesis was generally correct. The comparison of results graph shows Burford Spur was the least environmentally impacted with a total score of three, then Lodge Hill with a total score of 5, next was the Viewpoint. They had the highest score for vandalism and litter and a score of 9. The most environmentally impacted place was the Visitors Centre with a score of 10 and the highest score in space, air quality and noise. This is what I expected to find and I suggested it in my hypothesis as there is a greater amount of people in this area because of the facilities.

These are all the results of the EIA tests. They show that there is a higher score for the man made places such as the visitors centre.
Burford Spur had a total score of three
The visitors centre had a total score of ten this was the highest
The viewpoint had a score of nine this was the second highest score
Lodge Hill had a total score of five
TOTAL NUMBER OF SPECIES
Metres from the path
This is the total number of plant species graph.
SOIL DEPTH
This is the soil depth investigation graph.

During our visit to Box Hill we studied the level of environmental impact at four different locations and we also carried out a soil depth investigation. Our results were probably not very scientifically accurate as we only went for part of a very wet day.
To make our results more accurate we would have to measure steadily for several weeks in all kinds of weather.

Over all however, I generally proved my hypotheses. I found out that the Visitors Centre, being the most man made, has had the most impact on the environment. The total number of species test showed a slight trend towards an increase in numbers further from the path. Our soil depth results were effected but you could say that was the soil depth for a very rainy day.

The study helped me to understand how tourism can have a negative impact on protected areas. It made me think about the things that could be done to help this, for example, providing more litter bins, dog waste disposal bins and maybe CCTV to prevent vandalism. I felt that Box Hill suffers from "Honeypot Syndrome," which we have studied in our geography lessons. It means that many people will be attracted to a place of scenic beauty or historical interest, "like bees round a honeypot". This creates a problem in preserving the "honeypots" natural beauty, the reason it attracts so many visitors, whilst still providing facilities for its many visitors.

I would have enjoyed the day a lot more had it been sunny, but it was so cold and wet, although at the end we had hot chocolate to warm us up and that was nice :)
MAP OF BOX HILL
CYCLING
The 2012 London Olympic cycling road race event was held in Box Hill for the men and women. During the Olympics 3 million people visited Box Hill, usually it is 850 000.
FAUNA
The Box Hill Bug was thought to be unique but soon discovered in France and has been re-named the Box Bug
Home to the worlds largest slug called the Ash Black
FLORA
Box Hill is home to 40 percent of the UK box trees

FACTS
Over 850 000 people on average visit Box Hill every year
Box trees have a very distinctive smell
The leaves are small tough shiny and dark green
The trees are growing in the wild in England
Buxus sempervrions is the latin for Box Hill meaning evergreen
Home to 40 species of butterfly
Box Hill is owned by the National Trust
Metres from the path
Current School Yardley Court
SLUG
BOX BUG
BOX TREE
BOX HILL SURREY
INTRODUCTION
Box Hill in Victorian times
On Monday the 6th of October Year 8 from Yardley Court visited Box Hill Surrey as a geography field trip in order to study the impact of tourism on Box hill. We did this by measuring the EIA (environmental impact assessment) at four locations around Box Hill to see which were the most effected by tourism,and conducting a trampling investigation.

The site of Box Hill is a summit in the North Downs in Surrey, approximately 19 miles south of London. Its coordinates are TQ 178 511. About 850 000 people visit Box Hill each year and during the Olympics there were 3 million visitors watching the men's and woman's road race which took place in Box Hill. Ever since that there have been increasing numbers of cyclists at Box Hill. The highest point in Box Hill is 224 feet above sea level. Box Hill was given to the public to protect it from development in 1914 by Leopold Salomons who owned it at the time. In the 1900's people used to visit Box Hill to escape the busy London life and get some clean fresh air. Ever since Box Hill has been very popular with tourists in the summer and spring.
A map of the perimeter of Box Hill.
INVESTIGATIVE METHODS
We conducted two different types of experiment during our visit to Box Hill, a trampling investigation and a environmental impact survey.
TRAMPLING INVESTIGATION
We used a 0.5 meter quadrat and laid it down 10 times over a 10 meter distance along a busy path on Burford Spur. We searched the area covered by each quadrat for each plant species and counted how many species were in each quadrat.

We then looked at the depth of the soil. In order to do this we stuck a soil pin into the ground within the quadrant in five different places. We pulled the soil pin out and measured how far it went in the ground with a ruler. we recorded the results on a sheet and later produced a graph showing how compact the soil was at different distances from the path. The results may have been inaccurate because it was raining very heavily which softened the ground.

EQUIPMENT
Ruler
Quadrat
tape measure
soil pins
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT (EIA)
The EIA is an assessment of how much an area has been affected by tourism. Our aim was to investigate this in four different areas of Box Hill; Burford Spur, Visitors centre, Viewpoint and Lodge Hill which were chosen as they are focal points and should attract alot of tourists.. We measured the dog fouling, noise, litter, vandalism, air quality and space. We didn't use scientific equipment, just our visual observations. We rated each on a scale of 0 to 5, recorded our observations and later put them on a graph.
Lodge Hill
Burford Spur
Visitors centre
Viewpoint
THE FOUR PLACES WE VISITED TO INVESTIGATE THE EIA AT BOX HILL
Burford Spur
AIM
Trampling Investigation
I think that we will find a larger number of different plant species further away from the path as the nearer they are to the path the more likely they are to be trampled on.
I think that we will also find a greater number of plant species further away from the path as their habitat will not be trampled on.
I think that the soil will be deeper away from path
HYPOTHESIS
Environmental Impact Assessment
I expect that the visitors centre will be the area most affected by the tourism as it attracts the largest volume of tourists due to the facilities, for example toilets, cafe, and gift shop
Rain at Box Hill
HOW DOES TOURISM EFFECT BOX HILL?
Holds the only UK tarantula
DESIGNATIONS
AONB
Area Of Outstanding Natural Beauty
SSSI
Sight Of Special Scientific Interest
SAC
Special Area Of Conservation
EXPLANATION OF RESULTS
TRAMPLING INVESTIGATION
Total number of species
My results show a general trend for the number of plant species to increase the further away from the path you get which backs up my hypothesis. There are less plants nearer to the path because there are are more people walking there and trampling on them. Plants which are trampled on so frequently don't have a chance to grow back. Further from the path less people walk and more plants grow. There are a couple of unexpected results for example at 7 metres there were more species than there were at 10 metres. This could have been due to an error of recording the data because of the weather.


In my hypothesis I was expecting to find that the soil would be deepest further away from the path as it would be less compact because less people are trampling and stepping on it. There was a trend for less soil depth in the beginning and end. However, because of the weather the results were not quite how we expected as the soil was so wet and therefore quite soft and didn't show much variation in depth in all places measured.
Number of plant species
Soil Depth Investigation
Soil Depth In Millimeters
Environmental Impact Assessment
COMPARISON OF RESULTS
CONCLUSION
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