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Participle Phrases

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by

Mackenzie Brigham

on 1 October 2013

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Transcript of Participle Phrases

Participle Phrases
Participle Phrases
A participial phrase is a
part of a sentence
that contains a
participle
along with modifiers and objects (basically the rest of the sentence). The participle will most likely
follow the noun or pronoun
it modifies.

A comma should usually be placed at the
end
of the participle phrase unless the phrase is needed to understand the entire sentence.
Examples of Participle Phrases
Crawling down the hallway, the toddler rushed to his mother.

The maid cleaned the house yesterday.

Having loved music at a young age, Sarah was a natural musician.
Activity
What is a participle?
A participle is a verb that often ends in -ing or -ed.
It is used as an adjective
To review:
A participle is a verb that ends in either -ing , -ed, -en, -d, -t, -n, or -ne that serves as an adjective which modifies a noun/pronoun.
3 types of participles:
A
present participle
ends in -ing
A
past participle
ends in -ed, -en, -d, -t, -n, or -ne
A
perfect participle
consists of 2 words: "having + the participle"
Present Participles:
Having
Wishing
Rising
Caring
Taking
Walking
Checking
Carrying
Examples
Past Participles
Raised
Crunched
Broken
Smelled
Started
Driven
Perfect Participles
Having eaten
Having played
Having been
Having taken
Having written
Having read
Crawling
down the hallway, the
toddler
rushed to his mother.
Crawling
is the present participle
The participle functions as an adjective modifying the
toddler
The
maid

cleaned
the house yesterday.
Cleaned
is the past participle
The participle functions as an adjective modifying the
maid
A comma is not needed here because the participle and its phrase is crucial to the meaning of the sentence.
Having loved

music at a young age,
Sarah
was a natural musician.
Having loved
is a perfect participle
The participle serves as an adjective modifying
Sarah

Graffiti Wall
On the left side of the whiteboard, write a participle phrase. On the right side, write a subject/noun.
1. Using one participle from the left side of the whiteboard and one subject/noun from the whiteboard, write a sentence containing a participle phrase on a half-sheet of paper (you cannot use the participle and subject you came up with).

Once you're done, share your sentence with someone sitting near you.

I will collect it once you're done!
A participle phrase consists of a participle as well as the modifiers and/or objects.
Participles should be placed as close to the nouns/pronouns they modify as possible.
Read
Built
Ex: Realizing she forgot her chemistry book, Sam drove back home to get it.
Realizing

is the participle
As you are sharing your sentences:

Underline the participle phrase used in your partner's sentence
Circle the participle they used
Write the kind of participle used (present, past, or perfect)
Full transcript