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Launching a Digital Program

eBook presentation
by

Kit Vaughan

on 6 November 2012

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Transcript of Launching a Digital Program

Mackin’s eBook platform: mackinVIA The library is a one-stop shop – one place to go to access all types of information (print and non-print).
It’s a place students already know to go for information.
Central place through which to make purchases so that resources within a school (or county) are not duplicated.
The digital materials can be access through the library in several ways (library catalog, digital portal)
Equal access – allows all students access to information no matter what level, reading ability, or format needed. eReaders can be provided and monitored through the library.
Determining a need for digital materials in CCPS eBooks 101
Determining a need for digital materials in CCPS
How eBooks are currently used in CCPS
Mackin’s digital platform (demo – mackinVIA)
Developing a path forward
Questions? Meeting focus Funding from the top down
Determine a reliable method of gleaning statistical information on eBook usage so we can measure our success (TLC, mackinVIA reports…)
Plan for implementation
Digital content selection committee for county and school-wide purchases What is our path forward? 6 in 10 high school seniors read a digital book last school year.
58% of college students say they prefer digital books
(study by Pearson Foundation, 2011)

52% of children under the age of 8 use mobile devices
28% of children under the age of 8 have used an educational app on a mobile device.
(study by Common Sense Media, 2011) Some statistics. . . Libraries are evolving. . .
They used to consist of 4 walls, only print materials, set hours……. Why are CCPS Libraries leading the charge with digital materials? Good for visual learners; many eBooks are available in Spanish
Can be used for independent reading, literature circles, whole class use
What are the pros of using digital materials in a school setting? Increases technology use in the classroom
Available 24/7
Extends curriculum materials
More opportunities for blended learning
Can be used for instructional purposes in many settings (library, classroom, home) Like print materials, the cost of eBooks varies based on content, access/rights, and publisher
eBooks are an economical way to add content while serving a large number of students (simultaneously)
Digital materials don’t get lost, worn out, or damaged so replacement costs are eliminated What are the economics of digital materials? There are several different access methods for
delivery of digital materials: How do you read an eBook? If you purchase the ebook online (B&N, Amazon, etc.), then you have one copy to use. (Single use but you own it)
If you buy the book without restrictions as to how many students can read it at a time, a whole class can use it at the same time (Simultaneous use).
If you check it out from the (public) library, then you have 2-3 weeks to use it and then it goes away. What are the different access restrictions for ebooks? Fiction vs non-fiction titles – the availability of current fiction titles is limited and pricey; non-fiction titles are readily available. Individual titles vs. subscriptions – some titles can be purchased individually and some are bundled and renewed yearly Pdfs – simply reproductions of the printed materials Interactive books – most require participation by the reader There are several different types and formats of eBooks. . . eBook – an electronic book
(variously, e-book, ebooks,
digital book, or even e-edition)
is a book-length publication in
digital form, consisting of text,
images, or both, and produced on, published through, and readable on computers or other electronic devices. Wikipedia . . .determining how to include digital resources in the curriculum in the
ever-changing school environment Launching a Digital Program in
Chesterfield County
Public Schools Speaker: Kelly Morgott, Librarian, Hening ES

Speaker: Lori Donovan, Instructional Specialist for Libraries Where are we in CCPS today? The library is a one-stop shop – one place to go to access all typs of information (print and non-print).
It’s a place students already know to go for information.
Central place through which to make purchases so that resources within a school (or county) are not duplicated.
The digital materials can be accessed through the library in several ways (library catalog, digital portal)
Equal access – allows all students access to information no matter what level, reading ability, or format needed. eReaders can be provided and monitored through the library eBooks 101 Meeting focus There are several different access methods for delivery of digital materials: Read from a database of eBooks on a computer (Guttenberg books are an example)
eBook reader apps such as GoodReader, OverDrive, Kindle, Nook which are downloaded to a device (Smartphone, tablet, computer, etc.)
Use an eBook app which is a self-contained program that contains book content
eReader platforms such as mackinVIA, Follet Shelf – which serve as digital material portals
Check out from a library and download to an eReader (such as a Nook, Kindle, Sony, etc.) or computer How do you read an eBook? What is an eBook?
Use an eBook app which is a self-contained program that contains book content.
Use eReader platforms such as mackinVIA, or FolletShelf – which serve as digital material portals.
Check out eBooks from a library and download to an eReader (such as a Nook, Kindle, Sony, etc.) or computer. How do you read an eBook?
con't. . . What are the cons of using digital materials in a school setting? Implications for timely delivery based on network traffic
Some eBooks require Flash and Adobe Reader
Funding in the current budget
Funding for digital materials as a line item in future budgets
Now, libraries include information accessible 24 hours a day. They includes digital resources, multiple reading devices, and information is no longer contained within the library walls. These are a few of the reasons. . . In Chesterfield County Public Schools eBooks have increased from 284 items in 2010 to over 2700 in 2012

(TLC: “Count of Items by Holdings Code Groups Report”) A brief description. . . eBooks can be read from a database of eBooks on a computer (Guttenberg books are an example)

eBook reader apps such as GoodReader, OverDrive, Kindle, Nook can be used, which are downloaded to a device (smartphone, tablet, computer, etc.) Questions? How are eBooks currently being used in CCPS? What next?
Full transcript