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Industrial Revolution

includes reference to I-T Revolution
by

Colin White

on 26 February 2016

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Transcript of Industrial Revolution

e·con·o·my
/ikänmē/ Noun
The wealth and resources of a country or region, esp. in terms of the production and consumption of goods and services.
Industrial Revolution
Why did it happen?
The Industrial Revolution was the
transition to new manufacturing processes
that occurred in the period from about
1760
to some time between 1820 and
1840
. This transition included going
from hand production methods to machines and factories that held them...
What was the Industrial Revolution?
1.
New technology in farming
:
Example: Jethro Tull's seed drill
2.
New ideas in farming
:
Examples: crop rotation & the "
enclosure system
"
4.
New technologies
Examples:
James Watt
's steam engine, smelting iron with coal as the energy source
Why did the Industrial Revolution start in Britain?
1.
natural resources
Examples: coal, iron, rivers, and sea ports
3.
Available work force
Population boom + displaced peasants = migration to cities creating work force for factories
in·dus·try

(Definition)
/indstrē/ Noun

Economic activity concerned with the processing of raw materials and manufacture of goods in factories.
hand·made
/han(d)mād/ Adjective
Made by hand, not by machine.
2.
cap·i·tal
/kapitl/ Noun
Money to invest in business opportunities
10,000 years ago to less than 300 years ago...
In just the last 300 years...
Life before the Industrial Revolution
3.
en·tre·pre·neurs
/än-tr-p(r)-nr/ Noun
A person who organizes, manages, and assumes the risks of a business or enterprise.
1. Urbanization
the movement of people to the cities.
What were the effects of
the Industrial Revolution?

Geographic Effects
Social Effects
2. Creation of an Industrial Middle Class (bourgeoisie)
1. Creation of a Working Class (
proletariat
)
2. Factories become unsafe & unhealthy work places as
entrepreneurs
try to maximize profits
Examples:
no health or safety laws, children and women exploited (lower wages & working conditions)
Economic Effects
4. labor unions established
Social Effects
Economic Effects
Economic Effects
3.
Laissez faire
policies result in no laws to restrict businesses. One result is that wealthy business owners
buy all their competitors and create monopolies. A
monopoly
means no competition.
Political Effects
1.
Utilitarianism

Idea that government should impose some restrictions on business to create a greatest good for the greatest number of people.
Political Effects
2.
Socialism

Idea that the people as a whole, rather than private individuals, should own the means of production (farms, factories, railroads, natural resources, and other sources of wealth in a nation)
Karl Marx wrote
The Communist Manifesto
in 1848 predicting a class struggle in which proletariat would win and create a classless, "communist" society - the ideal end result of socialism.
5.
Harnessing sources of energy
Examples: water power, steam power (created by burning wood, charcoal, or coal)
The world's first industry was the
textile industry
tex·tile
/tekstīl/ Noun
Any type of cloth or woven fabric.

THINK ABOUT IT!
What kinds of things are made from woven cloth or fabric?
What was the world's first industry?
Entrepreneurs
built factories and used machines to replace the
"cottage system"
and the
"putting out system"
that had created textiles previously.
THINK ABOUT IT!
Where do you take part in the economy? Your parents?
THINK ABOUT IT!
What are 3+ things you use every day that were made in a factory?
THINK ABOUT IT!
What natural resources does Washington State have a lot of?
THINK ABOUT IT!
Who do you know that might be an entrepreneur?
THINK ABOUT IT!
Is Bothell mostly bourgeoisie, proletariat, or a mix of both?
THINK ABOUT IT!
What 3+ workers' rights might have been won by labor unions? Hint: One is the 8-hour work day!
THINK ABOUT IT!
What would you experience in a communist country today?
MAKING CONNECTIONS

Why has the Industrial Revolution happened in different parts of the world at different times?

What terms do we need to know before we dig into the Industrial Revolution?
From farms to factories - the industrial revolution begins...
Social Effects
3. The CLOCK becomes IMPORTANT

Factory work meant that people began to live their lives by the clock rather than by the rising and setting of the sun
THINK ABOUT IT!
Can you list 5+ events that require you to be somewhere at a certain time?
THINK ABOUT IT!
What might some results be if one company was the only place where you could buy a specific product?
Economic Effects
1.
Laissez faire
policies result in no laws to restrict businesses. One result is that wealthy business owners set up their
factories to maximize profits without regard for safety or the lives of the workers.
In urban areas, factory managers join doctors, lawyers, and small business owners in the bourgeoisie (middle class). Workers aspire to join the industrial middle class through promotions.
The unemployed and underemployed come to the cities for factory jobs and become a new social class - the
proletariat
- the industrial working class.
Examples: miners, mill workers, machinery operators...
What is the
Information Technology Revolution?
Information Technology Revolution
The development over the last 25 years of technologies specific to the making and sharing information.

Examples:
Innovations in telecommunications and the invention and development of computers and the Internet.
Information Technology Revolution
The development over the last 25 years of technologies specific to the making and sharing information.

Examples:
Innovations in telecommunications and the invention and development of computers and the Internet.
REVIEW

What is the
Information Technology Revolution?
RESPOND TO THE QUESTION

If we define a revolution as a sudden and significant change, what evidence is there that we are in the middle of an Information-Technology Revolution?
1965:
The Programma 101 was the first commercial "desktop computer", but today would usually be considered a printing programmable calculator.

In the 1970s:
Hewlett Packard introduced fully BASIC programmable computers that fit entirely on top of a desk, including a keyboard, a small one-line display and printer.

1976:
Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak sold the Apple I computer circuit board, which was fully prepared and contained about 30 chips.

2002
: More than 500 million personal computers were in use and one billion personal computers had been sold worldwide from the mid-1970s up to this time.
FACTS TO CONSIDER
ESSENTIAL QUESTION: What are the benefits and drawbacks of Industrialization?
Textile Industry before the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution changes the Textile Industry
CAUSES
Industrial Revolution
(Create this two-column chart. Use your notes to help you fill in the chart.)
Information-Technology Revolution
Effects
(Create this two-column chart. Use your notes to help you fill in the chart!)
Industrial Revolution
Information Technology Revolution
Geographic


Economic


Political


Social
Charlie Chaplin - "Modern Times"
Seminar Guidelines
Group members each discuss their article in the context of the Guiding Questions.

Groups have 10 minutes to review the Seminar Questions.

Groups send one member into the seminar circle each round (5 minutes each) to share the groups ideas on that questions.
Seminar Question #1
On which part of society (economic, political, geographic, or social) will the Information Technology Revolution have the biggest impact?

Use evidence from your articles and reference the Industrial Revolution wherever possible!

Seminar Question #2
What lesson(s) can we learn from the Industrial Revolution that might help us avoid problems as society lives through the Information Technology Revolution?

Use evidence from your articles and reference the Industrial Revolution wherever possible!

Seminar Question #3
What types of people might stand the most to gain from the Information Technology Revolution? Which might stand the most to lose?

Use evidence from your articles and reference the Industrial Revolution wherever possible!

Seminar Question #4
Will the Information Technology Revolution have a mostly positive or mostly negative effect on society?

Use evidence from your articles and reference the Industrial Revolution wherever possible!

Seminar Question #5
BONUS QUESTION

What part of your life has been on the top of your mind recently? How could a study of human history help you understand that part of your life?

Seminar Preparation
Guiding Questions / Annotate your article and answer the following questions!
1. Based on this article, what are the impacts of the I-T Revolution on human society?

2. Who gains and who loses from those impacts?

3. What similarities might exist between the I-T Revolution and the Industrial Revolution based on this article?

4. Based on this article, why might the I-T Revolution be seen as positive? Negative?

What is the main idea of this article?
Sit with people who have different color articles!
(4 people per table)

If you haven't finished your article and questions, see Mr. White so you can finish them!
Have out your article and your Guiding Questions half-sheet!
GOALS & GRADES for SEMINAR
Goals: Share what you know and think about the I-T Revolution we are living in and create a larger, clearer understanding for everyone.
Grades: To earn credit, you must:
a) read and annotate your article and answer 3 of the 4 questions on the Guiding Questions half-sheet
b) talk in the small circle and add something new to the discussion
c) reference your article and refer to something someone else has said
Full transcript