Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The American Revolution, 1754 - 1789

H109 PCHS ~ How Revolutionary was the American Revolution? Our journey begins with the fight of the colonists against the British and the making of a new nation.
by

Amber Fogle-Sergent

on 27 August 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The American Revolution, 1754 - 1789

SEPARATE ELEMENTS
Exam:
The Revolution, 1754 - 1789
How revolutionary was the American Revolution?
Describe the ways in which the colonists were "reluctant revolutionaries."
What events, people, conflicts, and bodies led to the coming of the American Revolution? (Stepping Stones)
Did certain ones have more influence than others? How? (French & Indian War, Intolerable Acts, Paine & Declaration of Independence, i.e.)
Why was the winning of the war "almost a miracle?"
What hardships and difficulties did the Continental Army face?
How did they sustain the war?
What were the weaknesses of the British army?
Why was George Washington brilliant at retreat?
Should citizenship be revolutionary?
What were the causes of Bacon's Rebellion & Stono Rebellion? (Before war)
What were their impact? (Race)
What were the causes of Whiskey's Rebellion & Shay's Rebellion? (After the war)
What were their impact (Order)
Was the Constitution a brilliant compromise to protect the liberty of all or the rights of elite?
What were the strengths and weaknesses of Articles of Confederation?
What role did the founders see for religion in American government?
How did Roman ideals and values influence our new concept of government?
What were the solutions of Anti-Federalists? Federalists?
How did they compromise?
How did popular views of property rights and racial inequality prevent slaves from enjoying all freedoms of a new nation?
Guiding Questions
Did certain ones have more influence than others? How?
Mercanilism, Salutary Neglect, King George III, Navigation Acts,
French & Indian War, Proclamation Act of 1763,
Sugar & Stamp Acts, Townshend Acts, Tea Act, Boston Tea Party, Sons of Liberty, Intolerable Acts, Quartering Act,
Bunker Hill, Lexington & Concord,
Second Continental Congress, Olive Branch, Thomas Paine's Common Sense & Declaration of Independence
What events, people, conflicts, and bodies led to the coming of the American Revolution?
Why was the winning of the war "almost a miracle?"
What hardships and difficulties did the Continental Army face?
How did they sustain the war?
What were the weaknesses of the British army?
Why was George Washington brilliant at retreat?
Describe the ways in which the colonists were "reluctant revolutionaries."
What events, people, conflicts, and bodies led to the coming of the American Revolution? (Stepping Stones)
Did certain ones have more influence than others? How? (French & Indian War, Intolerable Acts, Paine & Declaration of Independence, i.e.)
Should citizenship be revolutionary?
How much change must occur for something to be considered revolutionary?
How is a rebellion different from other kinds of revolts and conflicts?
Was the Constitution a brilliant compromise to protect the liberty of all or the rights of elite?
What were the strengths and weaknesses of Articles of Confederation?
What role did the founders see for religion in American government?
How did Roman ideals and values influence our new concept of government?
What were the solutions of Anti-Federalists? Federalists?
How did they compromise?
How did popular views of property rights and racial inequality prevent slaves from enjoying all freedoms of a new nation?
Study Guide
"Almost a Miracle"
Valley Forge
1) Reputation
2) Physical Presence
3) Brilliant Strategist
4) R-E-S-P-E-C-T
"George Washington was the virtuoso of resignations." [laughs] He perfected the art of getting power by giving it away.
British Assumptions of Warfare
Death...
Battle at Yorktown, 1781
3) Underestimated colonists
5) Different definitions of victory
2) Capture the Capitol...
1) Huge expanse of land overseas
4) Your enemy is my ally.
Citizen Army...
1 in 16 men of military age lost their lives
25,000 of 2 million in 1770s
3.75 million in 2015
Enlistments?
Home?
Experience?
Age?
Race?
"These are the times that try men's souls: The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph." Thomas Paine, 1776
Little food...
Little munitions...
Little money...(Blame Articles of Confederation)
So how?
Phase 1) 1775 - 1776: A display of force.
British win...sort of. Canada didn't join.
Battle of Saratoga, October 1777
Battle at Kings Mountain, October 1780
French
Spanish
Loyalists not a help
What kind of society was America going to become, and what kind of government would the new nation and its states possess?
Single most important...
The revolution's support cut across region, religion, and social rank.
Common farmers, artisans, shopkeepers, petty merchants were major actors during the Revolution.
Ex-servants, uneducated farmers, immigrants, and slaves emerged into prominence in the Continental Army.
Think about this:
289 identifiably black men in the Connecticut forces.
5 of them, when asked to give their surname, reported that their surname was Liberty.
18 when they signed on reported that their last name was Freedom or Freeman.
1780: Samuel Johnson, who said, "How is it that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty from [correction: among] the drivers of negroes?"
Prohibited Slave Trade:
Pennsylvania -- 1773
Rhode Island & Connecticutt -- 1774
Between 1777 and 1784, five states ended slavery with gradual emanciapation:
Vermont, Pennsylvania, Mass., Rhode Island & Conn.
Politicized the Resistance:
Boycotted British goods
Fought the war
Spin and weave homespun goods
Drafted petitions
What kind of society was America going to become, and what kind of government would the new nation and its states possess?
Bacon's Rebellion
Stono Rebellion
Shay's Rebellion
Whiskey Rebellion
Who revolted?
What did most of the people who came together to revolt have in common?
Class or caste? Race or ethnicity? Religion? Political affiliation? Type of labor? Or was it the people as a whole?
Why did they revolt?
Why were people unhappy with their government?
Why did they believe that revolution was the only way to make the change that they wanted?
How did they organize?
Was it planned for long time?
Was it spontaneous?
Were there leaders who did the organizing?

How did the people challenge the government?
Did they engage in peaceful demonstrations?
Did they have support of the military?
Did they engage in acts of warfare?
How did the government respond?
Did leaders give in to the people’s demands?
If so, how long did it take for them to give in?
Did they fight back using military force?

How was the nation the same or different following the revolution?
Did it change government?
Did it change society?
Was the change positive or negative for ordinary people?
Articles of Confederation
"A Brilliant Compromise"
10:28 - 35: 28
7:00 - 10:40
State Constitutions
Governors...
Legislature...
stripped of powers.
More humble & more rural origins.
Senates (English House of Lords) -- wisest & best of natural aristocracy.
More laws in decade following war than entire colonial period...
"173 Despots"
Why study Rome?
Political & Visual Imagery
Cincinnatus
Eagle
Troubles...
Historical.
Diverse forms of state government.
Articles of Confederation
Theoretical
Pit "ambition against ambition"
Checks and Balances
Practical.
Made government more practical and efficient.
More people to participate
"Laboratories of Democracy"

Why Federalism?
September
Review Session: Sept.
My Room, 3:20 - 5:00 p.m.
Bring your notes, textbook & food.
Student-driven & student-engaged.
Paradox of American Slavery
A Constitution that never mentioned slavery by name but nonetheless allowed slavery to continue to be legal.
Founding Father's Hope?
Article 1 section 9 for instance allowed for the continuation of the slave trade for 20 years after the ratification of the new Constitution.

Hoped it would die out.
Rutlidge?
Elseworth?
Williamson?
Franklin?
"...and, gradually, and with due sacrifices, I think it might be. but, as it is, we have the wolf by the ear, and we can neither hold him, nor safely let him go. justice is in one scale, and self-preservation in the other. of one thing I am certain, that as the passage of slaves from one state to another would not make a slave of a single human being who would not be so without it, so their diffusion over a greater surface would make them individually happier and proportionally facilitate the accomplishment of their emancipation...this certainly is the exclusive right of every state, which nothing in the constitution has taken from them and given to the general government.”
Thomas Jefferson to John Holmes, April 22 1830
2nd Middle Passage
A ship doctor's describes the ship
Gustavus Vassa's experience
Phase 2) 1776 - 1777: Capture New York.
British win until Trenton & Americans push British back 60 miles from ultimate goal.
Washington is an expert of retreat.
Just give me 6 weeks, he says.

Phase 3) 1777 - 1779: Subdue middle colonies.
British take Philly until Battle of Saratoga, a major turning point.
French support and munitions arrive, then Spanish enter the war as allies.
Phase 4) 1779 - 1781: Plan is to dislodge south by offering freedom to slaves who runaway from masters and use Loyalist support and take the southern colonies.
A large reservoir of Loyalist support. Use their help & move their way north.
But assumed wrong.
Full transcript