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Canadian First Nations

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by

Lorena Rivera

on 1 February 2014

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Transcript of Canadian First Nations

Shelters
They vary according to:
weather
materials available
life style
Tipis
Cone shaped houses built with wooden poles tied at the top and covered with animal skin. Good for hunters.
Wigwams
Dome shaped homes built with arched poles and covered with bark, grass, hides, brush or other materials.
Longhouses
Bigger and stronger shelters, big enough for several families and more appropriate for farmers.
Igloos
Built by inuits from snow blocks


Pit Houses
Holes in the ground covered with wooden poles, branches and dirt. Ladders built to go in and out.
Transportation
CANOE
SNOWSHOE
KAYAK
SLED
DOG AND TRAVOIS
Economic Activities
Provided:
food
materials for clothing, tools and shelter
HUNTING
All around Canada, aboriginals hunted
FISHING
FARMING
Mainly among the Iroquoians of the Eastern Woodlands
GATHERING
Caribou
Bison
Elk
Moose
Deer
Goat
Bear
Rabbit
Whale
Seal


Everywhere in Canada, but especially in the West Coast
Salmon, trout, whitefish
Berries and edible plants like herbs, sunflower, dandelion...
UMIAK
TOBOGGAN
CLOTHING
MATERIALS
WEATHER
INFLUENCE
BASIC:
Animal skins either pelts (with fur) or hides (without fur)
Deer, moose, bison, caribou, bear, muskrat, beaver, seal and salmon and more
FOR WEAVING:
Cedar bark strips, cattails, corn husks, goat's wool and grass
DECORATION:
Shells, quills, seeds, feathers, stones and vegetable pigments for colouring
little clothing or naked in warmer places (West Coast)
bark capes and spruce hats for the rain
heavy furs and multiple layers when cold
Grass skirt
Leather breechcloth
Spruce root hat
Leather shirt
Leather dress
Deerskin dress
Leather leggins
Deerskin moccasin
Leather pants
Chilkat shirt
(goat's wool
and cedar bark)
Fur poncho
Caribou skin parka
Bearskin parka
Fur mittens
Sealskin boot
Snow goggles
(caribou antlers)
Beaded necklace
Ceremonial
headdress
ART
Inukshuks
Inukshuk at Rankin Inlet
Dreamcatchers
Drums
Inuit Drum
Carvings
Caribou antler carving
Masks
Haida Shaman Mask
Paintings
Okanagan rock painting
Woven Objects
Haida cedar
bark basket
Totem Poles
West Coast Totem Poles
EARLY FIRST NATIONS OF CANADA
by Lorena
Early First Nations Geographical Areas
Arctic
Subarctic
Northwest Coast
Plateau
Plains
Eastern Woodlands Hunters
Eastern Woodlands
Farmers
Full transcript