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Computer Code

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Jimmy Nguyen

on 7 April 2011

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Transcript of Computer Code

Computer Codes Binary Code How it works 00100000 01101111 01101110 01101110 01101110 01101110 01100101 01100100 001000 01101111 01101110 01100101 01100100 01100101 01100100 01100101 01100100 01100101 01100100 01100101 01100100 01100101 01100100 01101111 01101110 01101111 01101110 01101111 01101110 01101111 01101110 01101111 01101110 01100010 01101001 01100010 01101001 01100010 01101001 01100010 01101001 01100010 01101001 01100010 01101001 01100010 01101001 01100010 01101001 01100010 01101001 01100010 01101001 01110010 01111001 01110010 01111001 01110010 01111001 01110010 01111001 01110010 01111001 01110010 01111001 01110010 01111001 01110010 01111001 01110010 01111001 01110010 01111001 01110010 01111001 01100101 01100100 01100101 01100100 01100101 01100100 ◦To understand binary code, it is important to first understand exactly what the code is and the functions it serves. Binary code is a breakdown of complex language into very simple zeros and ones. For instance, the binary code for the letter "A" is 01000001, the code for "B" is 01000010 and "C" is 01000011.
01100101 01100100 01100101 01100100 01100101 01100100 01100101 01100100 01100101 01100100 01100 0110 Binary numbers are used to represent all information in the digital world. They’re similar to our decimal system, which uses the digits 0 to 9, except binary uses only 0 and 1.

Binary is handy because now we can easily use something physical to represent numbers. For instance we could use a laser. When it's on you know it means ‘1’ and when it’s off you know it means ‘0’. This is a bit like morse code, but instead of long and short, it is on and off.

When we write numbers in decimal, it's the position or place of the number that tells us what its real value is. With 246 for example, the 6 at the end is six ones, the 4 in the middle is four tens and the 2 is two hundreds. Each place or position is 10 times greater than the previous position.

The binary number system also uses place to give value, but as we have only 2 numbers to work with each place or position is only 2 times greater than the one before. The number 2 is binary 10 (one two and no ones)
The number 3 is binary 11 (one two and one one)
The number 4 is binary 100 (one four, no twos and no ones)
The number 5 is binary 101 (one four, no twos and one one)
Who uses the
binary code The binary code was originally used in practical applications such as computers, electrical circuits and other digital technology. Now, the binary code can be found used by CDs and radios.
CDs have a series of hills and valleys on its surface. When light does reflect on the surface, it represents the 1, and if it doesn't, it represents the 0.
The way the radio uses binary is through the radio waves. If the radio is able to pick up a wave, it is a 1, and if it doesn't, it is a 0. 01010100 01101000 01100101 00100000 01000101 01101110 01100100 The End Created by:
Celine Huynh,
Huy Lim Kha,
Reece Brown and Jimmy Nguyen
9S1 Binary Code was first introduced by the German mathematician and philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz during the 17th century. Leibniz was trying to find a system that converts verbal statements into a pure mathematical one. After his ideas were ignored, he came across a classic Chinese text called ‘I Ching’ or ‘Book of Changes’, which used a type of binary code. He created a system consisting of rows of zeros and ones. During this time period, Leibiniz had not yet found a use for this system.
Another mathematician and philosopher by the name of George Boole published a paper in 1847 called 'The Mathematical Analysis of Logic' that describes an algebraic system of logic, now known as Boolean algebra. Boole’s system was based on binary, a yes-no, on-off approach which consisted the three most basic operations: AND, OR, and NOT. This system was not put into use until a graduate student from Massachusetts Institute of Technology by the name Claude Shannon noticed that the Boolean algebra he learned was similar to an electric circuit. Shannon wrote his thesis in 1937 which implemented his findings. Shannon's thesis became a starting point for the use of the binary code in practical applications such as computers, electric circuits, and more History of the Binary Code
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