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Comparison between China's anti natal policy and Singapore's pro natal policy?

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Ahmed Sabet

on 27 November 2012

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Transcript of Comparison between China's anti natal policy and Singapore's pro natal policy?

Comparison between China's anti natal policy
and Singapore's pro natal policy Why did they introduce both policies? China: china's one child policy was introduced by Chinese leader, Deng Xiaoping, in 1979 to reduce birthrates (916,395,000people) in china due to its rapid population growth.

Singapore: Mr. Goh Chok Tong, the First Deputy Prime Minister, announced in March 1987 the slogan “have three or more children” to increase Singapore's birthrates (2,736,000 people) as it had a very low infant mortality rate(1.1) after the “stop at two” policy which was anti natal. What are the policies aims? China’s one child policies aim is to encourage couples to have only one child to slow down china’s rapid population growth by rewarding couples who follow the policy and punishing those who don’t

Singapore’s pro natal policy’s aim is to encourage couples to have three or more children to speed up its population growth by rewarding families that follow its policy. There aim was to increase there population by 40% over the next 40 years.

They both have one aim in common which is to
achieve the optimum population. Rewards for having one child in China:
- Higher wages
- Interest free loans
- Retirement funds
- Priority housing and school enrollment Penalties for having more than one child:
- Fines from $370-$12,800
- Pressures to abort pregnancy
- Confiscated belongings
- Getting fired from work Rewards for Singapore pro natal policy:

$10,000 for having two children and tax relief for the third child.
Singapore's pro natal policy did not have any sanctions or penalties. Penalties for having more than one child in China:
- Fines from $370-$12,000
- Pressure to abort pregnancy
- Confiscated belongings
- Getting fired from work : Disadvantages of China's one child policy:
- Increase in preference of male babies over female babies which lead to which lead to abortion of baby girls, neglecting baby girls, offer them for legal and illegal adoption, or even killing them.
- This has caused an imbalance of 114 boys for every 100 girls, so men cannot find any women to marry which lead to kidnapping and selling of women for marriage and increased prostitution.
- Because of the one child policy and the improvement of healthcare there are more old people than young people in the economically active age to support the workforce which effects China's economy.
- The one child policy causes a single person to support both their parent and their 4 grandparents which forces them to depend more on retirement funds, which many people don't have. If the child cant support their family or dies the parents and grandparents will have no money to support them. How successful have the policies been? China's one child policy has been very successful
because they have reached there aim by preventing
400 million births from 1979-2010.

Singapore's pro natal policy was also successful as it's population increased by 2,340,000 from 1986-2010, which was their target. China's one child policy has been very successful
because they reached there target by preventing 400 million births from 1979-2010, 76% of China's population supported the policy. Exceptions to China's one child policy:
- Families living in rural areas were allowed to have a second child but 4 to 5 yrs between them
- Disabled children
- If the first child was a girl they were allowed to have another one hoping its a boy.
- Parents who work in high risk occupations.
- Children born overseas. China's one child policy was more successful as its fertility rate was 1.54 which is 1.02 below the worlds fertility rate. In Singapore women are being career orientated and unaffordable housing expenses allow young people to stay longer with their parents resulting to late marriages. China THANK YOU FOR WATCHING :)
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