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People Etcetera

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by

Mark Rodrigues

on 26 March 2014

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Transcript of People Etcetera

People Etcetera
People are lovely to
touch
-
A nice warm sloppy tilting belly
Happy in its hollow of pelvis
Like a bowl of porridge

People are no fun to
notice
-
Their eyes taking off like birds
Away from their words
To settle on breasts and ankles
Irreverent as pigeons

People are god to
smell
-
Leathery
,
Heathery
,
Culinary
, or
Chanel
,
Lamb's-wool
,
sea-salt
,
linen dried
in the wind,
Skin fresh out of a shower.

People are good to
taste
-
Crisp
and
soft
and tepid as new-made bread,
tangy
as blackberries,
luscious
as avocado,
Native
as Milk,
Acrid
as truth.

People are irresistible to
draw
-
Hand following hand, eye
outstaring
eye,
Every curve and experience of self,
Felt
weight
of flesh,
tension
of muscle
And all the geology of an elderly face.

And people are easy to write about?
Don't say it.
What are these shadows
Vanishing
Round the
Corner
By Elma Mitchell
By
Andrew
and
Mark

Simile
Lack of punctuation
Simile
Simile
Use of commas
Metaphor
Similes
Use of commas
No full-stop
Enjambment
Effect
of the
Poem

Biography
Born in
Airdare
,
Lanakshire
In
November

1919
Elma
Mitchell
Earned a scholarship in
Somerville College
,
Oxford
Where she studied
English
She then moved to
Somerset Village
of
Buckland St Mary
Where she became a
writer
and
translator
And
wrote poems
Full transcript