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Sophomore Programming Philosophy

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Lucas Novotny

on 27 October 2011

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Transcript of Sophomore Programming Philosophy

Sophomore Programming 2010 Miltenberger, L. J. (1996). Paraprofessional staff and the first-year experience. In W. J. Zeller, D. S. Fidler, & B. O. Barefoot (Eds.), Residence Life Programs and The First-Year Experience, 2nd Edition. (The Freshman Year Experience Monograph No. 5) (pp. 67-74). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina. Pascarella, et al (1994). The impact of residential life on college students. In Realizing the educational potential of residence halls. p. 23-52. (lh) Welty (1994) Achieving curricular objectives through residence halls. In Realizing the educational potential of residence halls. p. 70-92). (lh)
Levine (1994). Guerilla education in residential life. In Realizing the educational potential of residence halls. p. 93-106. (lh)
Schroeder (1994). Developing learning communities. In Realizing the educational potential of residence halls. p. 109-132. (lh)
Evans, Forney, and Guido-DiBrito (1998). Student development in college. (lh)
Low and Handal (1995) The relationship between religion and adjustment to college. In Journal of college student development. p. 406-412. (lh)
Luzzo, McWhirter, and Hutcheson (1997). Evaluating career decision-making factors associated with employment among first-year college students. In Journal of college student development. p.166-172. (lh)
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Miltenberger, L. J. (1996). Paraprofessional staff and the first-year experience. In W. J. Zeller, D. S. Fidler, & B. O. Barefoot (Eds.), Residence Life Programs and The First-Year Experience, 2nd Edition. (The Freshman Year Experience Monograph No. 5) (pp. 67-74). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina.
Dude, K. & Hayhurst S. S. (1996). Residence life programming and the first-year experience. In W. J. Zeller, D. S. Fidler, & B. O. Barefoot (Eds.), Residence Life Programs and The First-Year Experience, 2nd Edition. (The Freshman Year Experience Monograph No. 5) (pp. 75-83). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina.
Theory Yea Right So why do we program? Philosophy Discover The Real "SP" A.I. begins an adventure. The urge and call to adventure has been sounded by many people and many organizations, and it will take many more to fully explore the vast vistas that are now appearing on the horizon. But even in the first steps, what is being sensed is an exciting direction in our language and theories of change—an invitation, as some have declared, to “a positive revolution”. a theory underlying or regarding a sphere of activity or thought 1. valuing; the act of recognizing the best in people or the world around us; affirming past and present strengths, successes, and potentials; to perceive those things that give life (health, vitality, excellence) to living systems 2. to increase in value, e.g. the economy has appreciated in value. Synonyms: VALUING, PRIZING, ESTEEMING, and HONORING. Ap-pre’ci-ate, v., 1. the act of exploration and discovery. 2. To ask questions; to be open to seeing new potentials and possibilities. Synonyms: DISCOVERY, SEARCH, and SYSTEMATIC EXPLORATION, STUDY. Appreciative Inquiry (AI) In-quire’ (kwir), v., The core task of the discovery phase is to discover and disclose positive capacity, at least until an organization’s understanding of this “surplus” is exhausted.

A.I. provides a practical way to ignite this “spirit of inquiry” on organization- wide basis. Questioning Stage Needs Assessment What? For Whom? Resident Wants Timing How? In the dream stage, participants are asked to "dream up"
the best case scenario ; without any restrictions. Dream Program!? Unlimited Budget Infinite Space What would you do? Relaxed Risk Management When would it be? Where? Design Simply Stated..."The Nitty Gritty" How will the program be designed? When? Where? Budget Who is involved Purpose Outcomes Collaborators? Timelines For Whom? Proposals Contracts Publicity Procedures Tasks Delegation Deliver Make it Happen Implementation Assessment Recognition Simply stated— human knowledge and organizational destiny are interwoven. To be effective as executives, leaders, change agents, etc., we must be adept in the art of understanding, reading, and analyzing organizations as living, human constructions. Knowing (organizations) stands at the center of any and virtually every attempt at change. Thus, the way we know is fateful. The Constructionist Principle: The Foundation Here it is recognized that inquiry and change are not truly separate moments, but are simultaneous. Inquiry is intervention. The seeds of change—that is, the things people think and talk about, the things people discover and learn, and the things that inform dialogue and inspire images of the future—are implicit in the very first questions we ask. The questions we ask set the stage for what we “find”, and what we “discover” (the data) becomes the linguistic material, the stories, out of which the future is conceived, conversed about, and constructed. The Principle of Simultaneity A metaphor here is that human organizations are a lot more like and open book than, say, a machine. An organization’s story is constantly being co-authored. Moreover, pasts, presents, or futures are endless sources of learning, inspiration, or interpretation—precisely like, for example, the endless interpretive possibilities in a good piece of poetry or a biblical text. The important implication is that we can study virtually any topic related to human experience in any human system or organization. We can inquire into the nature of alienation or joy, enthusiasm or low morale, efficiency or excess, in any human organization. There is not a single topic related to organization life that we could not study in any organization. The Poetic Principle The infinite human resource we have for generating constructive organizational change is our collective imagination and discourse about the future. One of the basic theorems of the anticipatory view of organizational life is that it is the image of the future, which in fact guides what might be called the current behavior of any organism or organization. Much like a movie projector on a screen, human systems are forever projecting ahead of themselves a horizon of expectation (in their talk in the hallways, in the metaphors and language they use) that brings the future powerfully into the present as a mobilizing agent. To inquire in ways that serves to refashion anticipatory reality—especially the artful creation of positive imagery on a collective basis--may be the most prolific thing any inquiry can do. Our positive images of the future lead our positive actions—this is the increasingly energizing basis and presupposition of Appreciative Inquiry The Anticipatory Principle: This last principle is not so abstract. It grows out of years of experience with appreciative inquiry. Put most simply, it has been our experience that building and sustaining momentum for change requires large amounts of positive affect and social bonding—things like hope, excitement, inspiration, caring, camaraderie, sense of urgent purpose, and sheer joy in creating something meaningful together. What we have found is that the more positive the question we ask in our work the more long lasting and successful the change effort. It does not help, we have found, to begin our inquiries from the standpoint of the world as a problem to be solved. We are more effective the longer we can retain the spirit of inquiry of the everlasting beginner. The major thing we do that makes the difference is to craft and seed, in better and more catalytic ways, the unconditional positive question. The Positive Principle So All this is Great but What do I Do with it? the 2010 sophomore programming requirements Programming Wheel Physical Spirtual Vocational
Intellectual Emotional Social Re Re arere Reference: A Positive Revolution in Change: Appreciative Inquiry by David L. Cooperrider and Diana Whitney. Questions?? Dream
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