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Copy of Genres of Poetry

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by

Bernhard Bruhnke

on 22 April 2014

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Transcript of Copy of Genres of Poetry

Genres
of
Poetry

Narrative Poetry
* Poetry that tells a story
* Generally contains a narrator, as well
as characters, setting, conflict, plot
- uses same devices as prose
* Originally created to explain traditions
- i.e. tall tales
* One of the most popular/beloved forms of poetry
* Types of narrative poems include:
- ballads
- epic poems
- novels written in verse

Examples:
"The Road Not Taken" - Robert Frost
"Theme for English B" - Langston Hughes
Sonnets
Shakespearean sonnets:
* Wrote 154 sonnets
* Title: numbered (i.e. Sonnet 36)
* Written in iambic pentameter
- iambic:
- pentameter:
* Composed of 3 quatrains, 1 couplet
- quatrain: 4 line stanza
- couplet: 2 line stanza
* rhyme scheme: abab cdcd efef gg

Examples: "Sonnet 18"
"Sonnet 116"
Ballads
* A form of narrative poetry
- tells a story
* Often set to music because of its sing-song like feel when spoken
* Now it is considered as a love song
- especially in pop/rock genres
- power ballad, rock ballad
* Contains an easily identifiable rhyme scheme
* Often contains a repeated refrain

Examples:
"Piano Man" - Billy Joel
"Hotel California"- The Eagles
"Pinball Wizard" - The Who
"Cats in the Cradle" - Cat Stevens
"Night When the Lights Went Out in Georgia" - Reba McEntire
Limericks
* Witty, humorous or nonsense poem
* Consists of one five line stanza
* Strict rhyme scheme: aabba
* Often contain hyperbole and onomatopoeia
* Generally are not titled
* Gained fame by Edward Lear

Example:
"There Once Was a Man from Nantucket"
Parody
* Poem that mimics another
- generally a well-known poem
* Uses same poetic elements
- form, rhyme scheme, etc.
* Written as a comedic response to original (supposed to be funny)


Examples:
"A Dieter's Night Before Christmas"
"Sonnet 18 (A Cheesy Parody)"
Free Verse
* Also known as open form
* No consistent pattern required
- rhyme scheme, form, musicality, etc.
- however, the poet may choose to use them
to create structure within the poem
* Still considered a "form" of poetry
* Tends to be found in most contemporary
poetry
* Walt Whitman is known as the "Father of free verse" because of his controversial (at the time) free from form poetry found in the collection "Leaves of Grass"

Examples:
"egg horror poem" - Lauren Winter
Spoken Word
* Performance Art
* Often include experimentation with other art forms such as:
- music, theater, dance, etc.
* Used to give audiences an insight on a particular life aspect
* Gained media popularity through Russell Simmons' Def Poetry Jam 2002-2007
* Currently Spoken Word artists mainly use YouTube to "publish" their poems
* Much more accessible form of poetry outside of the academic environment
Also Known as "SLAM" Poetry.

Examples:
"Touchscreen" - Marshall Davis Jones
"If I Should Have a Daughter" - Sarah Kay
Concrete Poems
* Also known as shape or visual poetry
* The words on the page are formed in a way in which conveys a particular theme, rhythm, etc.
* Visual elements of the poem are
JUST AS IMPORTANT AS THE TEXT
* The visual artistic form of poetry
* Very contemporary: began in the 1950's


Examples:
"400 Meter Freestyle" - Maxine Kumin
"The Mouse's Tale" - Lewis Carroll
Haiku
* Traditional Japanese poetry
* Very strict structure
- 3 lines, 17 total syllables (5-7-5)
* No rhyme scheme
* Typically focus on nature
* Focus on creating an image based on few words
* Contains an allusion to a season

Examples:
"Haiku" - Richard Wright
"Honku" - Aaron Naparstek
DO YOURSELF A FAVOR. DON'T OVERTHINK
POETRY. POETRY DOES HAVE MEANING TO A
WRITER, BUT POETRY IS TRULY PERPECTIVE. THE
GREATEST MEANING IS WHAT YOU GIVE IT.
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