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Keep Calm & Carry On

CTC Statewide Disaster Response
by

Hilary Seo

on 22 April 2014

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Transcript of Keep Calm & Carry On

Emergency Response & Salvage Wheel
Field Guide to Emergency Response
Minnesota Historical Society Disaster Resources:
www.mnhs.org/preserve/conservation/disaster_resources.htm
NARA Disaster Response & Recovery
www.archives.gov/preservation/disaster-response/
National Park Service Wet Recovery
www.nps.gov/hfc/products/cons/wet-recovery.htm
Floppies--magnetic media
air dry w/in 48 hrs
or rinse & keep wet & upright up to 72 hrs
Optical--CD/DVD, WORM
clean & air dry w/in 48 hrs
or rinse in cases & keep wet in cool water
Emergency phone tree w/disaster team members
Disaster response training
Disaster response supplies & list of vendors
Instructions for response & recovery
Logistics for inventorying and moving collections
Identified workspaces
Collection priorities
Building & floor plans
Disaster
Salvage Triage

Conclusion
Disaster Preparedness
Planning & Preparation
d
Plan™
Disaster
Strikes

Evacuation & Emergency Procedures
Assessment
Reenter the building when okay to do so
Environment--power & climate control?
How much time has elapsed?
What collections were affected?
What is the magnitude of the disaster?
Document overall physical state of collections including photographic documentation
Deal with safety issues first
Make sure everyone is accounted for
Phone tree--make phone calls
administration & other stakeholders
recall staff & volunteers
supply vendors
service vendors
Initiate your Operational Continuity Plan
Salvage Triage
Sensitivity of Materials
Collection Salvage Priorities
Severity of Damage
Documenting the information
The Matrix
Paper-based Materials
Books
Documents
Art on paper
Photographs
Media (Inks, etc.)
Textiles
Recorded Media
Film based
Magnetic media
Electronic storage
3-D objects
Furniture/Wood
Paintings
Metals/Stone/Glass/Ceramics
Natural History
Skin and Leather Products
Salvage Options
Air-drying
Interleaving/Blotting
Dehumidification/Desiccant
Freezing/Freeze drying
Vacuum freeze drying
Submerging in water
Ignoring/Tossing
Sample Priority List & Floorplans
The Matrix
Severity of Damage
Time
few hours
--
half day
--
one day
--
days/weeks
Type of damage
sooty/dirty
--
physical damage
--
wet
--
moldy/charred/crushed
Extent of damage
dirty & dry
--
damp & muddy
--
soaked & caked in mud
dented
--
warped & failing
--
in pieces
Quiz 1:
Quiz 2:
Quiz 3:
Q & A
Keep Calm & Carry On
Disaster Response

Thank you!
Hilary Seo, Head of Preservation
Iowa State University
hseo@iastate.edu

Pete Sixbey, Conservator
State Historical Society of Iowa
Pete.Sixbey@iowa.gov

Melissa Tedone, Conservator
Iowa State University
tedone@iastate.edu
Begin Salvage Process!
Salvage Triage Definition
Sorting and prioritizing the rescue of damaged administrative records and collection materials
What should and can be saved with the time, staff, funds, etc. that you have
Based on:
collection priorities
sensitivity of materials
extent of damage
resources available
Establishing Priorities
Collections that most directly support the institution's mission
Items on loan to the institution
Collections needed for continuity of operations--vital records, administrative records, reference collections, information not available electronically
Unique or difficult-to-replace collections or items
Research collections
Monetarily valuable items
Provenance
Other criteria?
AIC-CERT
American Institute for Conservation
Collections Emergency Response Team
Introduction of AIC-CERT for FAIC Emergency Planning and Mitigation Strategies Workshops 2012.

Prepared by Beth Antoine, AIC-CERT Coordinator.
Magnetic reel-to-reel--A/V, data storage
air dry w/in 48 hrs
NEVER freeze

Microfiche & Film negatives
freeze or air dry w/in 48 hrs
NEVER freeze OLD negatives

Microfilm & Motion picutre film
keep wet until rewashed & air dry w/in 72 hrs
NEVER freeze
3-D Objects
Wood Objects & Furniture
Paintings
Skin and Leather
General rules
Organic material more vulnerable
Inorganic material less vulverable
Composite & complex objects tend to be more vulnerable and problematic
Sensitivity
Porous
Dimensionally unstable
May be composite object
Varnish / paint may deteriorate or bloom
Veneers may lift
Cracking, splitting, warping may occur
Paper
Books: Potential Problems
Media
Photographs
Books
Sensitivity
Mold
Canvas supports can be tensioned
Wooden supports can warp & split
Large paintings will be very heavy when wet
Varnishes can blanch / bloom and be sensitive to abrasion
Canvas supports expand & contract
Salvage priorities
Ceramics
Natural History Collections
Sensitivity
Untanned, semi-tanned or fully tanned can all be damaged by water
Untanned will shrink, stiffen, thicken, cockle & discolor or disintegrate / gelatinize
Semi-tanned leather can be just as sensitive as untanned
Salvage priorities
Some Types:
Printing inks
Writing inks
Graphite (pencil)
Pastels/Charcoals
Watercolors
Sensitivities:
Light-sensitive?
Water-soluble?
Friable?
Sensitivity
Many minerals are water soluble
Restored fossils may separate at repair lines, bones may crack
Herbarium specimens may come loose from sheets
Labels come loose from objects
Concerns
The Big Question: Glossy vs. Uncoated
Potential Problems:
Blocking
Cockling
Staining/tidelines
Loss of media
Mold growth
Composite
Functioning
Porous
Hygroscopic
Loss of function
Stench
Staining/tidelines
Loss of media
Blocking
Cockling/warping
Mold growth
Modern vs. Historic
Silver gelatin
Color prints
Digital prints
Albumen
Collodion
Dageurrotypes
Tintypes
Ambrotypes
Etc.
Photographs: Potential Problems
Damage to image layer
Curling
Blocking
Warping/tearing
Mold growth
Salvage: What To Do
Air dry
Blotter dry
Interleave
Freeze
Metals
Sensitivity
Corrosion can proceed quickly in damp conditions
Corrosion such as rust can stain nearby objects
Stone & Glass
Sensitivity
Ceramics are generally less vulnerable
Lower-fired ceramic object is more vulnerable to water damage
Salvage priorities
Metals, Stone, Glass, Ceramics
Additional resources:
Sensitivity
Generally stable
Archaeological & deteriorated materials are exceptions
Handling may be biggest issue for glass & heavy stone objects
A sprinkler head breaks and showers two faces of shelving that have medium-rare, leather-bound books on one side and priceless ceramic and glass artifacts on the other with a small collection of trinket boxes made of shell and metal.

What is your salvage priority order?
A. Leather bound books
B. Priceless ceramic and glass artifacts
C. Shell and metal clasp and hinged trinket boxes
Heavy rains have flooded your basement records storage area that contain vital records. Everything is under a foot of water including your server, paper records, and microfiche files.

What is your salvage priority order?
A. Pack your server for shipment to a recovery vendor
B. Pack and freeze your paper records
C. Pack and freeze your microfilm
A roof leak has affected several rows of shelving. The top row of cloth-bound books printed on uncoated paper are saturated and several of the volumes have severe mold growth (see photo). The second row of thick, cloth-bound serials printed on glossy paper are wet about 2” in from the edges of the pages. The third row of leather-bound books printed on uncoated paper are damp. Pick the salvage option you would pursue for each row, and then place the action in order of salvage priority.
Quiz 3 cont.:
Row #1: (Choose one salvage action)
A. Freeze the entire row
B .Discard the moldy items and freeze the remaining books
C .Discard the moldy items and fan out the remaining books to air dry

Row #2: (Choose one salvage action)
A. Freeze the books
B .Fan out the books to air dry
C .Interleave the pages with paper towels

Row #3: (Choose one salvage action)
A .Freeze the books
B .Fan out the books to air dry
C .Interleave the pages with paper towels

Order of salvage action (list row numbers):
First Row #___, then Row #___, and finally Row #___.
Potential Problems:
Fading
Haloing/Bleeding
Flaking/Loss
Hard drives
keep wet, do not rinse
pack drives well and take to data recovery service
or on the cheap, open case, air dry and hope for the best
Flash drives
air dry?
Electronic storage
Film based
Full transcript