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AQA B1

AQA GCSE Biology B1
by

Kath Morrill

on 20 October 2012

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Transcript of AQA B1

Variation objectives 1.3 Sexual and asexual reproduction Family features 5. nege 1. ionvitara 2. ncereihite 3. mnetnoirvne 4. itenegc Unscramble Comparing Carrots TESCO carrots Market value carrots write down at least 10 different characteristics
Which characteristics are genetically inherited, which are environmental and which are both?
Draw a table to summarise your results Label the diagram. Making DNA

Some characteristics, such as eye colour and the shape of the earlobe, are controlled by a single gene. These genes may have different forms.

Different forms of the same gene are called alleles.

Alleles are dominant or recessive. Dominant alleles are shown with a 'CAPITAL' letter and recessive alleles with a 'lower case' letter. Alleles Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by a bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria are carried in the air. In most cases, the disease affects the lungs. No Cystic fibrosis is caused by a gene mutation. The gene controls the movement of salts and water into and out of the cells. The mutated form of the gene causes thick mucus to be secreted by the lungs, airways and pancreas, plus many other symptoms. The mutated gene is recessive to the normal gene.. Yes A climate change might favour some variants in a population but could not, itself, produce those variants. There has to be a genetic change for the climate change to act upon No A new combination of genes could produce a variation that had a selective advantage Yes A change of habitat might favour a variation resulting from a genetic change, such as a mutation, but selection could not result from an organism simply changing its habitat No A gene mutation which caused a change in the organism could be subject to natural selection Yes The dog is homozygous recessive for the curly allele, homozygous dominant for hair length and heterozygous for the colour gene but the black allele is dominant Yes The allele for black fur is dominant to the allele for white fur No The answers are provided. Explanations of why the alternatives are unsatisfactory are also offered INTERACTIVE MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS Genetics Rich people should be taxed more than poor people? Same 2 friends – girl falls pregnant, but does not want boy to know. What do you do? Fight at school, your friend gets the blame even though it was you who started it. Stem cells

Draw your own diagram to explain where stem cells come from.
What can scientists use stem cells for?
Scientists hope to be able to grow new organs to replace those that are damaged. How are stem cells used to do this?
Why do some people think that using stem cells is unethical (wrong) How to clone a sheep
A cell is taken from tissue in the udder of a sheep.

An egg cell is taken from an adult female sheep.
 
The nucleus of the egg cell is removed.
 
The 2 cells are fused together using an electric shock.
 
The fused cell begins to divide normally and develops into an embryo.
 
The embryo is placed in the uterus of a foster mother.
 
The embryo develops normally into a lamb.
 
The lamb is an exact clone of which sheep? In human reproduction the sperm cell has a tail so it can move towards the ovum (egg cell). Fertilization happens when a male sex cell nucleus and a female sex cell nucleus join together. 
The instructions to make a new person are found in a fertilized egg cell nucleus.
These instructions are called genes.
All of a person’s characteristics are controlled by their genes.
Your blood group depends on what country you grow up in. 
If you dye your hair red for more than two years, you could have red-haired children. True or false (2) 1. Sexual reproduction needs a male and a female.
2. Only animals use sexual reproduction. 
3. Characteristics are passed on from parents to offspring in sexual reproduction.
4. In humans the male sex cells are called sperm. The female sex cells are called ova (or egg cells). 
5. In some people there is a third, extra type of sex cell that produces identical twins.  True or false (1) Outcomes
Revise lessons 9-14
9. Huntington’s disorder
10. Cystic fibrosis
11. Gregor Mendel
12. Male or female
13. Karyotypes
14. Genetic screening
[15. Ethics of genetics]
Review your understanding against the TLOs Revision!!! Work in groups of 3 or 4
There are 8 scenarios to consider
You have 3 minutes to discuss each one, make a decision and complete the sheet provided
After 3 minutes an alarm will sound and you will swap questions with the group next to you
At the end we will collate the results from all groups The ethics of genetics Ethics
A set of principles that may show how to behave in a situation
We all have a slightly different set of ethics – what we believe is right or wrong On iPads
Follow link on mrbrownless.com

2. In your own words, explain the following;
antenatal and neonatal tests
PGD
carrier testing
false positive and false negative

3. Kings are offering tests for Huntington’s disorder. List 3 reasons why you would want to take the test and 3 reasons why you wouldn’t want to. Genetic screening
Testing a population for a particular allele
e.g. testing newborn babies for genetic disorders
Genetic testing
Testing one individual for a particular allele
e.g. testing a person at risk of inheriting Huntington’s disorder http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICdWvlZFkdE Outcomes
Define the terms genetic screening and genetic testing.
Research some key terms using the iPads
Consider the advantages and disadvantages of genetic testing 14. Genetic testing ‘Stereotype karyotype’
Read the information about a disorder which only affects men
Answer the questions Cut out each chromosome with scissors, for speed, cut them out as squares rather than trying to cut around the margin of each chromosome.
Prepare a karyotype of these chromosomes. A karyotype is a pattern or picture of chromosomes from one cell grouped into pairs and organized by size.
Pair up each of the chromosomes with its homologous pair, use the size and markings on the chromosomes to determine pairs.
On a blank page, arrange the chromosome pairs from largest to smallest and number them. You numbers should range from 1(largest) to 22(smallest).
Put the sex chromosomes last, this is pair 23.
Glue or tape the chromosomes to the paper in the correct order. Prepare a ‘karyotype’ How many words can you make from the word karyotype before everyone else finishes writing??? Outcomes
Create a ‘karyotype’
Learn about chromosomal disorders 13. Karyotypes TASK 2
In pairs (if a 3, one can record results) play eye colour snap. What’s this? If c is the allele that causes cystic fibrosis, show how healthy parents can have offspring with the disorder Outcomes
Define the symptoms of cystic fibrosis
Explain how cystic fibrosis is inherited
Interpret a pedigree diagram/family tree to determine the percentage changes of individuals inheriting genetic disorders 10. Cystic fibrosis Hh OR HH 2. What possible alleles does someone with Huntington’s disorder have? hh 1. What alleles does someone who is healthy have? To Do:

Complete the What are the Chances? worksheet Huntington’s Disorder http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Huntingtons-disease/Pages/Introduction.aspx Using your dragon alleles, draw genetic diagram and a Punnett square for the following;




For each one; write the percentage of the offspring having each feature Dragon offspring A male dragon (Ff) mates with a female (ff).
Draw a genetic diagram to show the possible alleles for the baby dragons
Draw a Punnett square to show the same thing
What fraction of the baby dragons will breathe fire?
If 100% of the baby dragons can breathe fire, what do you know about the parent’s alleles? Alleles and offspring Sickle cell anaemia is caused by a mutation in a gene controlling the composition of haemoglobin. This mutation causes the red cells to become distorted in low oxygen concentrations and so block small blood vessels. The mutated gene is recessive to the normal gene Yes An infected mother may pass the disease on to her baby, so the disease may, superficially, appear to be inherited AIDS is caused by a virus, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The virus is transmitted by sexual intercourse or by infected syringe needles. No No The dog is heterozygous for the colour gene, but the allele for black fur is dominant to the allele for white fur The dog carries both dominant alleles for long hair No Certainly all 12 mice will be black as explained in the first answer, but the sex is inherited as explained in the third answer, so the expectation is that there will be 6 males and 6 females in the litter No You see an old woman getting mugged in a park. What do you do? Would you download pirate DVD’s even though some money goes to organised crime Outcomes
Define the term stem cell
Discover some possible uses for stem cells
Consider the ethics of using stem cells 18. Stem cells Outcomes
Define the term clone
Explain why identical twins are clones of each other
Explain the process of nucleus transfer that was used to clone dolly the sheep 17. Dolly the sheep My ‘designer’ baby http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ixEDLa3Jlc Outcomes
Explain how new techniques can allow people to design their own baby
Design a newspaper front page to express your views 16. Designer babies (PIGD) Should genetic screening and testing be allowed?
List 2 reasons why and 2 reasons why not. Outcomes
Understand the term ethics and that different people have different opinions about what’s right and wrong 15. The ethics of genetics Can you draw a Punnett square to show the offspring for a male and a female? Outcomes
Know that the Y chromosome causes male characteristics
Conduct an experiment to prove what percentage of offspring will be male 12. Male or female In your books, create your own version of the jigsaw to illustrate Mendel’s experiments on pea plant.

Use coloured card, cut, stick, and be creative……!!!

Other characteristics of pea plants showed the same results so you don’t have to do flowers………. 11. Gregor Mendel Gregor Mendel (1822-1884) studied the inheritance of different characteristics in pea plants.
He found that when he bred red-flowered plants with white-flowered plants, all the offspring produced red flowers.
If he bred these plants with each other, most of the offspring had red flowers, but some had white.
This was because the allele for red flowers is dominant, and the allele for white flowers is recessive.
Genetic diagrams help to show how this works. 50 hh hh Hh Hh Chance of any child having Huntington’s disorder is __________% 3. Bill and Mary want to have children. Bill has one copy of the Huntington’s allele. Mary is healthy. In your own word describe what a dominant allele is. Outcomes
Know the symptoms of Huntington’s disorder
Explain how Huntington’s disorder is inherited using a Punnett square and a genetics diagram 9. Huntington’s disorder Back to start End show End of questions Question 10 (a) a gene mutation or (b) a change of habitat or (c) a gene recombination or (d) a climate change Before natural selection can take place in an animal, there has to be either … Question 4 Question 8 (a) Long, white, straight fur (b) Short, black, straight fur (d) Long, black, curly fur (c) Long, white, curly fur What will be the phenotype for a small dog with the genotype LLBbss? If L is the allele for long hair and l is the allele for short hair, B is the allele for black hair and b is the allele for white hair, S is the allele for straight hair and s is the allele for curly hair Question 3 Close but … These are only the chance combinations.
A combination of 4 black to 8 brown is close to the expected ratio of 3:9 but since black is the dominant allele it seems to be the wrong way round gametes bb Bb Bb BB b b B B From the Punnett square you can see that the expected ratio is 3 black (BB or Bb) to 1 brown (bb) Not very close From the Punnett square you can see that the expected ratio is 3 black (BB or Bb) to 1 brown (bb) gametes bb Bb Bb BB b b B B These are only the chance combinations. It would be possible to produce 6 black and 6 brown pups but this is not very close to the expected ratio of 9:3 Question 4 (c) 4 black and eight brown (b) 6 black and 6 brown (a) All black (d) 8 black and 4 brown X A male heterozygous black mouse (Bb) is mated with a female heterozygous black mouse (Bb) and the litter consists of 12 pups. B is the allele for the black colour. The allele for brown colour is b. The dominant allele is B. Which of these ratios is closest to the expected ratio for the distribution of colour among the offspring? Question 2 As explained in the previous slide, the allele for black fur is dominant to the brown allele, so there can be no brown mice in the litter from this cross No gametes bB bB Bb Bb b b B B Brown female Black male Question 3 (a) 6 brown females and 6 black males (b) 9 black and 3 brown, all male (c) 6 black males and 6 black females (d) 12 black males What is the expected distribution of colour and sex in their litter? A pure-breeding male black mouse is mated with a female brown mouse and they produce a litter of 12. The allele for black fur is dominant to the allele to brown fur. Question 1 You find a wallet on the floor with £200 in it? What do you do? TASK 1
In pairs (if a 3, one can record results) complete the table and prove the percentages of male to female offspring TASK 2
In pairs (if a 3, one can record results) play eye colour snap. 11. Gregor Mendel Gregor Mendel (1822-1884) studied the inheritance of different characteristics in pea plants.
He found that when he bred red-flowered plants with white-flowered plants, all the offspring produced red flowers.
If he bred these plants with each other, most of the offspring had red flowers, but some had white.
This was because the allele for red flowers is dominant, and the allele for white flowers is recessive.
Genetic diagrams help to show how this works. Unscramble the words; Outcomes
Know who Mendel was
Create a genetics diagram to illustrate what he discovered about genetics 11. Mendel out of four possible combinations produces a healthy child (hh) Only one combination 25% hh Hh Hh HH h H h H If they have a child, what is the chance that it will be healthy? The Huntington’s disorder
allele is DOMINANT so you only need to inherit ONE copy to develop the disease YES Explain your answer: Will they develop the disease? 4. George and Mildred both have one copy of the Huntington’s allele each. (They are both Hh) (a) Cystic fibrosis (b) AIDS (c) Sickle cell disease (d) Tuberculosis Which of the following can be inherited? Question 5 The closest These are only the chance combinations.
A combination of 8 black to 4 brown is closest to the expected ratio of 9:3 gametes bb Bb Bb BB b b B B From the Punnett square you can see that the expected ratio is 3 black (BB or Bb) to 1 brown (bb) Inheritance of colour is explained in the first answer. The male mouse carries the X and Y chromosomes. The female mouse carries two X chromosomes. At meiosis, only one of each chromosome pair goes to the gametes. Yes gametes bBXY bBXX BbXY BbXX bX bX BY BX Brown female Black male The pure-breeding male’s genome must be BB and the brown mouse’s genome must be bb. The allele for black fur is dominant over the brown allele. Therefore all the offspring will be black (Bb) gametes bB bB Bb Bb b b B B Brown female Black male No Activities
Do you think the term ‘designer’ is useful?
What are your opinions on ‘designer babies’
Is it right or wrong? How do we decide…….
Design a newspaper front page expressing your views As you know we all vary due to our and our .
New technology means we can check for the genes we know about in the early stages of development. We cannot check for characteristics that are controlled by many genes! But we can check to see if an embryo will be a boy or a girl or if they have any medical conditions e.g. cystic fibrosis Why? My keywords Due to advances in genetics we can now screen embryos produced by IVF to look for specific genes. We can then decide which embryos to implant into a woman’s uterus so she has the baby of her choice. In the media you might see stories about ‘designer’ babies.
What is a designer baby?
What do you think it could mean? Designer babies There is no way that any child can inherit the Huntington’s disorder allele (H) so all the children will be
healthy hh hh hh hh h h h h 0% What is the chance that any child they have will develop the disease? hh Charles: hh Nigella: 5. Nigella and Charles are both healthy. What alleles do they carry? fatal understand twitching muscles middle symptoms one dominant inherited Copy and complete the note below, filling in the gaps

Huntington’s disorder is an _________ disorder. It is caused by a _________ allele so you only need to inherit ____ copy of the allele to develop the disorder.

The ________ of Huntington’s disorder appear in ______ age

Patients with the disorder gradually lose control of their _______ - this first appears as _________. They gradually become more forgetful and find it difficult to _________ things

Huntington’s disorder is eventually _____ Not very close These are only the chance combinations. It would be possible to produce 12 black pups, since ‘black’ is the dominant allele but this is not close to the expected ratio From the Punnett square you can see that the expected ratio is 3 black (BB or Bb) to 1 brown (bb) gametes bb Bb Bb BB b b B B To provide a tissue match To choose a boy or girl Medical reasons Activities
Do you think the term ‘designer’ is useful?
What are your opinions on ‘designer babies’
Is it right or wrong? How do we decide…….
Design a newspaper front page expressing your views As you know we all vary due to our genes and our environment.
New technology means we can check for the genes we know about in the early stages of development. We cannot check for characteristics that are controlled by many genes! But we can check to see if an embryo will be a boy or a girl or if they have any medical conditions e.g. cystic fibrosis Why? My keywords
Designer babies
Embryo
Gene
Inherited conditions Due to advances in genetics we can now screen embryos produced by IVF to look for specific genes. We can then decide which embryos to implant into a woman’s uterus so she has the baby of her choice. In the media you might see stories about ‘designer’ babies.
What is a designer baby?
What do you think it could mean?
A designer baby is what the media mean by a child that is produced by new technology. This technology allows us to screen and select embryos due to their genes Designer babies 1.2 Genes, chromosomes & DNA 1.4 Cloning 1.5 Animal clones 1.6 Genetic modification objectives 2.1 The theory of evolution Interdependence & adaptation Energy in biomass 2.2 Evidence R objectives 4.1 Pyramids of biomass objectives 3.1 Adaptations objectives 4.2 Energy in biomass 3.3 Defence Medicine & drugs Keeping Healthy 1 2 3 4 5 7 6 R R Nerves
& hormones Evolution Chemistry – 14th January to 8th March
Physics – 11th March to 24th May
Work experience during physics topic
Chemistry Exam – 10th June
Physics Exam – 13th June Y10 Core Course Biology – 1 hour exam = 25%
Chemistry – 1 hour exam = 25%
Physics – 1 hour exam = 25%
ISA– Practical investigation = 25% Y10 Core Course Biology – Now to 23rd November
ISA – 26th November to 10th December
Exam – 9th January Y10 Core Course Present information about variation in tables and charts.
Classify characteristics as being due to genetic or environmental causes. 1. Collate results in a table and display the results as bar charts.
2. Which are continuous variations? Discontinuous variations?
3. Include in the table whether each characteristic is due to genetic or environmental causes, or both. (How Science Works)
Class survey of characteristics 1.2 Variation Label diagrams to illustrate the order of size of cell, nucleus, chromosome and gene. Different ________ control different
_______________. ____________ carry
information about characteristics and are
passed from parents to offspring in_______________.
Every nucleus contains_______________ that
carry _____________. gene(s) chromosome(s)
gamete characteristics Define sexual and asexual reproduction.
Explain why sexual reproduction results in variation, but asexual reproduction does not produce variation. http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/science/aqa/geneticvariation/reproductionrev1.shtml ______________ reproduction produces offspring that resemble their parents, but are not identical to them. ___________________reproduction produces offspring - _______________ - which are genetically identical to their parents.

Sexual reproduction
Organisms have sex cells called _______________. In human beings, the male sex cells are called ____________ and the female sex cells are called eggs or _________. Sperm plants ova asexual
gametes sexual animals clones Fertilisation
Sexual reproduction happens when a male gamete and a female gamete join. This fusion of gametes is called fertilisation.
Sexual reproduction allows some of the genetic information from each parent to mix, producing offspring that resemble their parents but are not identical to them.
In this way, sexual reproduction leads to variety in the offspring. Animals and plants can reproduce using sexual reproduction. Define the terms ‘clone’, 'cutting' and 'tissue culture'
Explain the importance of cloning to plant growers.
Grow plant clones using 2 different methods Explain why identical twins are clones.
Describe 2 modern cloning techniques. Make informed judgements about the economic, social and ethical issues concerning genetic engineering. Define the term ‘GM’.
Explain how insulin can be made. Define the terms ‘inherited’ and ‘acquired’.
State the theory of evolution.
Identify differences between Darwin’s theory of evolution and Lamarck's theory. Define the terms 'natural selection' and 'mutation'.
Describe the stages in natural selection.
Explain why mutation may lead to more rapid change in a species. objectives 2.3 Natural selection & mutation http://www.bbc.co.uk/apps/ifl/schools/gcsebitesize/science/quizengine?quiz=aqa_evolutiontest&templateStyle=science Test Bite last lesson.......
Name the 2 types of variation
Give 3 examples for each
Which are continuous variables?
Which are discontinuous variables? Biology Unit 1 http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/science/aqa/geneticvariation/reproductionact.shtml BBC Bitesize revision Sexual reproduction Practical activity 1. Clone a spider plant by taking a cutting
2. Clone a cauliflower using tissue culture What do Jedwood & dolly the sheep have in common? Embryo transplants
A developing embryo is removed from a pregnant animal at an early stage, before the embryo’s cells have had time to become specialised. The cells are separated from one another. They are then grown for a while in a laboratory and transplanted into host mothers.
When the offspring are born, they are identical to each other and genetically related to the original pregnant animal. They are not related to their host mothers because they contain different genetic information. 1. Embryo transplant 2. Adult cell cloning Draw a diagram or cartoon to explain how insulin is made by genetic modification bacterium
DNA
gene
plasmid
enzyme 1.7 Ethics Consider the advantages and disadvantages of genetic engineering. Consider the advantages and disadvantages of genetic engineering. Research:

Research advantages and disadvantages of GM crops.
What characteristics may be modified?
Produce a poster or a table of benefits
versus concerns for homework. Be able to give 2 reasons why farmers are in favour of growing GM crops.

Be able to give 2 reasons why some people are against growing GM crops. ICT ROOM
Classify organisms based on their similarities.
What's the evidence for evolution? objectives Tree of life Task 1;
Find answers to your 3 objectives

Task 2;
Explain how Lamarck's theory was different to Darwin's theory


Task 3;
Suggest reasons why Darwin's theory was only gradually accepted.
Suggest reasons for the different theories. Questions on lesson 1.
Define adaptation
Describe and explain adaptations for survival in the arctic and a desert. Task: 2

Design and label an imaginary creature to survive in a given habitat (you choose). The more unusual the better. ICT Lesson Lives in the hot sulfurous springs of Yellowstone Park List factors that affect the survival of organisms in their habitat.
Give examples of resources that plants and animals compete for in a given habitat. In your own words explain how plants can be cloned by
1. cuttings
2. tissue culture
Complete the sentence;
'Cloning is important to plant growers because....' Explain advantages and
disadvantages of cloning
techniques. Advantages Disadvantages
1.
2.
3.
4. Genetic engineering Task 1 Copy the diagram and explain, in your own words, how fossils are formed. Task 2 This image is evidence for evolution. How? Classification lion
tapeworm
spider
snail
duck
frog
green algae
penicillium
ferns
mushroom
bacteria
mucor
mosses
sunflower START One headlouse in the population mutated and was able to survive the poison in the shampoo.
The ‘Superlouse’ was more likely to breed than the headlice killed by the poison.
Eggs laid by the ‘Superlouse’ carried the same mutation and hatched into lice that could also survive the poison.
These lice spread to other people and bred.
The number of resistant lice in the population increased.
People couldn’t get rid of their headlice.
Scientists developed a new poison to kill the headlice.
END The cycle began again and the species changed a little more. Headlice Draw a cartoon strip illustrating how the process of natural selection (caused by mutations) can lead to headlice becoming resistant to headlice shampoo. Why might mutations lead to a more rapid change in a species?
Give examples of how an environment can change.
Interpret population curves Interpret data on lichen distribution and sulfur dioxide levels.
Interpret data on invertebrates and water pollution. Describe adaptations that some organisms have to avoid being eaten. Define the term ‘extremophile’
Research one example and present your findings to the rest of the class. 3.2 Extremophiles 3.4 Resources 3.5 Environment 3.0 Investigation 3.6 Living indicators objectives objectives objectives objectives objectives objectives ICT Lesson ICT Lesson objectives objectives objectives objectives objectives objectives Draw a table to show each adaptation of a polar bear and how it helps it to survive in its environment. Draw a table to show each adaptation of a camel and explain how the adaptation helps it to survive in the desert. Higher;
Do the same for the cactus. Key words habitat
ecosystem
environment
population
community
resource For both animals and plants explain WHY they need to compete for each resource.
e.g. Animals need water because without it they become dehydrated and vital organs will fail. http://www.jwjonline.net/fuchsia_cuttings.php Fuchsia cuttings BBC Bitesize revision http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/science/aqa/evolutiontheories/theoriesofevolutionact.shtml Use the information sheet and answer in full sentences;

1. Name 2 living and 2 non-living factors that cause environmental change
2. What causes air pollution?
3. Name a living indicator of air pollution.
4. What causes water pollution?
5. Name a living indicator of high water pollution. _______________ can be cloned artificially using cuttings or tissue culture. _______________ can be cloned using embryo transplants or fusion cell cloning. Genetic information from one species can be transferred to another species using genetic modification. Cloning of plants has many important commercial implications: it allows a successful variety of a plant to be produced commercially and cheaply in a short space of time and on a massive scale. lichen sludge worms About Sludge Worms
Sludge worms live in clusters on the bottom of ponds and streams. They burrow themselves into the mud and live upside down. They wave their bodies in the water to collect oxygen. They are so good at this that they can live in polluted ponds where the oxygen levels are low. Understand the use of equipment to measure oxygen levels, temperature and rainfall
Investigate a living indicator cHOICE CHAMBERS Using woodlice as a living indicator Determine the preferred environment for woodlice using a simple 'choice chamber'.

You could test one or several factors e.g. soil, temperature, moisture, light......

You can only use equipment found in the lab.

Before you start, in your books;

The question you want to answer
e.g. Do woodlice prefer leaf litter or compost?
Hypothesis (what you expect to happen)
Equipment
Method
Results table decomposers
predators
prey
primary consumers
secondary consumers
producers
scavengers Write the correct word on your sheet http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/science/aqa/energy_biomass/energyinbiomassrev2.shtml BBC Bitesize Energy in food chain animation dates Grade boundaries stuff
Higher objectives
Interpret evidence relating to evolutionary theory.
Classify organisms based on their similarities. Is GM food better than organic food? What's the difference between GM food and organic food?
What will you test?
How will you record your results?
How will you make it fair? 4 apples (o) £1.20
6 apples £2.00
Chocolate (o) £2.25
Chocolate £1.99
Milk (o) £1.09/L
Milk £0.49/L
Houmous (o) £1.19
Houmous £1.19 1.START One headlouse in the population mutated and was able to survive the poison in the shampoo.

2.The ‘Superlouse’ was more likely to breed than the headlice killed by the poison.

3.Eggs laid by the ‘Superlouse’ carried the same mutation and hatched into lice that could also survive the poison.

4.These lice spread to other people and bred.

5.The number of resistant lice in the population increased.

6.People couldn’t get rid of their headlice.

7.Scientists developed a new poison to kill the headlice

8.END The cycle began again and the species changed a little more. The whole story Writing reports Draw a sketch of each and state what it measures Review food chain terminology
Construct and interpret pyramids of biomass Be able to draw a pyramid of biomass using information given in a food chain.

Note: Candidates do not need to be able to interpret pyramids of number. HIM Task
Evolution Describe how plants and animals return materials to the environment.
Describe the role of microorganisms & detritus feeders in decay. Describe how energy and mass is transferred along a food chain.
Explain why energy and biomass is reduced at successive stages in a food chain. State factors affecting the rate of decay.
Explain how decay is useful to plants.
Evaluate the necessity and effectiveness of recycling organic kitchen or garden wastes. Explain the carbon cycle in terms of photosynthesis, respiration, feeding, death and decay, combustion of wood and fossil fuels. 4.3 Decay 4.4 The carbon cycle objectives objectives Be able to give two reasons why deforestation increases the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

Be able to describe how the carbon in dead bodies may be recycled.

Be able to describe the stages in the carbon cycle. Demo: Use a sensor to measure carbon dioxide levels in the air; show a piece of coal and discuss what it is and how it was formed.

Activity: Revise how carbon dioxide is used by plants in photosynthesis and why this is of use to animals. What happens to the carbon? How the carbon passes from plants to animals; how it is returned to the air; what happens when things die; formation and combustion of fossil fuels.

Demo: Show examples of fossil fuels; burn a fossil fuel and bubble the fumes through limewater. 7.1 Food •Explain how carbohydrates, fats and proteins are used by the body to release energy and to build cells.
•State that mineral ions and vitamins are needed in small amounts for healthy functioning of the body. Activity: Look at food labels as a stimulus to list the food groups needed in a balanced diet and discuss their uses. Sort food pictures into groups.
Less able candidates could produce a food pyramid using food labels or a wall display showing food groups with examples of foods.
HSW Food tests: Produce a Venn diagram showing foods which have different combinations of the nutrients tested. (Chemicals for starch, sugar, protein and fat tests)
HSW Energy in foods: Mounted needles, wotsits, peas, balance, boiling tubes, cylinders, thermometers, Bunsen burners and goggles.
Try the Kellogg’s Nutrition Trail found in the Learning section of www.kelloggsalarabi.com objectives 7.2 Deficiency objectives 7.4 Health & inheritance objectives 7.6 Aseptic techniques objectives 7.3 Metabolic rate objectives 7.5 Pathogens objectives •Evaluate information about the effect of food on health. look at pictures showing deficiency diseases.
Note: Specific functions of nutrients and the effects of any deficiency in the diet is not required. Be able to explain the effects (e.g. underweight, overweight), of Type 2 diabetes and deficiency diseases.
Be able to define obesity. •Describe factors that affect the metabolic rate e.g. the rate varies with the amount of activity you do and the proportion of muscle to fat in your body. HSW: Calculate BMIs. BMI calculator can be found in the Health section of the BBC website at www.bbc.co.uk or at www.eatwell.gov.uk by searching ‘BMI calculator’.
Activity: Use height-weight charts to classify people.
Discuss: Use food labels to discuss saturated and unsaturated fats and their effect on cholesterol levels and heart disease. Be able to state two factors that affect the metabolic rate.
Be able to explain why too much saturated fat is bad for us. to state the benefits of exercise on the body.
Note: Effect of exercise on breathing and heart rate is not required. Imaginative inquiry – accurately assess the validity of a scientific claim e.g. ‘Healthy Chocolate’.
Analyse and evaluate claims made by slimming programmes and products.
Evaluate information about the effect of lifestyle on development of diseases.
Research: Research different types of diets, eg Atkins, Slimfast, G.I., Weight Watchers and list pros and cons. Research obesity problems in children in the UK or from another country.
Match diets to different people.
Write an article or a blog to detail lifestyle changes they must make.
Task: Calculate values from nutritional information on food packets. •Explain how inherited factors can also affect our health e.g. metabolic rate and cholesterol levels. Be able to use data from a bar chart to compare the numbers of deaths from different pathogens.
Note: Structure of bacteria and viruses is not required. ask: Look at pictures of bacteria, viruses and fungi and link these to diseases.
Research: Conduct research into different diseases.
Online task: Complete a table giving examples of diseases caused by viruses and bacteria. •Explain how pathogens cause disease. HSW: Use agar plates to compare the growth of micro-organisms from unwashed and washed hands (to be observed in later lesson).
•Describe and carry out aseptic techniques. 7.7 Semmelweiss objectives 7.8 Defence objectives •Describe the work of Semmelweiss and link to results of class investigations.
. Be able to relate work of Semmelweiss to problems with spread of infection in hospitals today. SW: Pasteur’s experiment.
HSW: Research the work of Semmelweiss. •Describe ways in which the body defends itself against disease.
•Explain how microbes make us feel ill and how viruses damage cells.
•Describe the actions of white blood cells using terms ‘ingest’, ‘antibodies’ and ‘antitoxins’. Be able to explain how to reduce risk of infection. Task: Label diagram to show how body prevents entry of microbes.
Compare viral and bacterial infections.
HSW: Use microscope or bioviewers to view blood smears.
Draw diagrams or cartoon strip to show actions of white blood cells.
Video: BBC clip or video on defence against disease. 7.9 Antibiotics objectives 7.10 Antibiotic resistance objectives
•Use aseptic techniques and explain the precautions taken when handling microorganisms.
•Explain how antibiotics work. •Explain how the treatment of 1 disease has changed due to understanding the action of antibiotics and immunity.
•Explain the difficulty in developing drugs that kill viruses without damaging body tissues.
•Evaluate the consequences of mutations of bacteria and viruses in relation to epidemics and pandemics.
•HT only; Explain what we should do to slow down the rate of development of resistant strains of bacteria. Discuss: Brainstorm medicines used to relieve symptoms and treat disease; names of some antibiotics.
HSW: Antibiotics or antiseptics etc and growth of microbes (area of clearance to be measured in later lesson). Investigate type of agent or concentration.
HSW: Research work of Fleming and /or Florey and Chain.
Be able to explain why schools do not incubate above 25°C. Be able to explain why drugs that kill bacteria cannot be used to treat viral infections.
Be able to explain why bacteria and viruses make us feel ill. Antibiotic resistance – research MRSA and C. difficile infections and treatment. BBC website is a good place to start.
Research flu pandemics.
Task: Draw a timeline to show how treatment of disease has changed over the years. 5.1 The nervous system objectives 6.1 Drugs objectives 5.2 Stimulus & response objectives 5.3 Reflex action objectives 5.5 Body temperature objectives 5.6 Hormones objectives 5.4 Controlling the body objectives olve candidates to demonstrate stimuli we detect – loud bang, light, touch, movement, smell and taste.
Demo: Response to different temperatures.
Activity: Label diagrams to show the brain, spinal cord, nerves; neurones within nerve; light receptor cell.
HSW: Detecting different tastes on the tongue – draw results on diagram of tongue.
HSW: Investigate sensitivity of different areas of the body. •Describe the functions of the main structures in the nervous system.
•Explain why the nervous system is important. Be able to match the organ containing receptors to the stimulus detected. Match organs with the stimuli they detect.
Describe one receptor cell.
Investigate reaction times.
Demo: Knee-jerk and pupil reflexes.
Discuss their importance and gather other examples leading into explanation of why they are faster than a voluntary action.
Try the Sheep Dash activity.
HSW: Investigate reaction time using different combinations of receptors.
Activity: Use cards to sequence the pathway of a nerve impulse. Arrange candidates holding cards in the sequence and discuss role of each and how impulse passes from one to another.
Match structures in nerve pathway to different reflex actions e.g. production of saliva when smelling food; pupil response to light.
Homework: Research diseases of the nervous system. Know what substances the body needs to control and why
Identify water inputs and outputs Describe how body temperature is controlled
Explain WHY Be able to link the organ to the condition it helps control in the body.
Be able to name three conditions which are controlled within our bodies.
HSW Label the body’s inputs and outputs on a diagram of the body – water, ions, CO2, sugar and heat.
HSW: Investigate the effect of temperature on enzyme activity e.g. digestion of starch. •Define the terms hormone and gland
•Explain how hormones control the menstrual cycle •Research how hormones are used to control fertility. Discuss: Recap the control of blood sugar levels as a lead into names of other hormones, where they are produced and how they are transported around the body.
Brainstorm changes that occur in boys and girls at puberty – what causes them?
Task: Produce a diagram to show the names, sites of production and effects of FSH, LH and oestrogen in the menstrual cycle.
Use past BLY1 exam questions to analyse data relating to hormones and the menstrual cycle.
Be abl Be able to explain the different roles of FSH, oestrogen and LH. HSW: Investigate what is normal body temperature.
HSW: Investigate the effect of exercise on body temperature and /or sweating. Be able to state how oral contraceptives have been improved over the years.
Be able to describe the main stages involved in IVF treatment. nk the hormones used in oral contraceptives to their effects on the body.
Produce a flow diagram to explain the process of In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF).
Activity: Look at oral contraceptive packaging to find out the names of hormones used.
Research: Research why each hormone is used and produce a report on the advantages and disadvantages of different oral contraceptives.
Discuss: Apply different ethical approaches to making a decision about non-vital transplants.
Discuss: Discuss possible causes of infertility in men and women and treatment available.
Research: Research the process of IVF and produce a report.
Invite an outside speaker to discuss contraception e.g. women’s health nurse.
A good activity can be found at www.UPD8.org.uk by searching for ‘New womb?’ 5.7 Hormones & fertility objectives 5.8 Plant hormones objectives

Demo: Demonstrate a plant’s sense of touch – Venus fly trap, Mimosa, Honeysuckle or show video clips.
HSW: Effect of light on growth of shoots: Mustard seedlings in dishes, two light boxes and clinostat in light box.
HSW: Compare the ability of different plants to reach light – obstacle course: Three identical shoe boxes with simple obstacle course inside and hole at one end, dish of mustard seedlings, germinating broad bean and sprouting potato.
HSW: Demonstrate positive and negative phototropism: Broad bean seedling held by pin in jar with light entering through a slit.
HSW: Investigate which part of a shoot is sensitive to light.
HSW: Effect of gravity on growth of plants.
HSW: Interpret Darwin’s experiments.
HSW: Interpret experiments using agar blocks and seedlings with shoot tips removed.
HSW: Demonstrate response to water. Investigate how plant shoots and roots respond to light, gravity and moisture.
Describe how auxin makes this happen. 5.9 Commercial uses objectives •Explain how plant hormones are used as weed killers and rooting hormones. W: Investigate the effect of rooting hormones on growth of cuttings.HSW: Investigate the effect of weed killer on an area of lawn. Be able to state some commercial uses of plant hormones. Be able to give reasons for the different stages in drug testing. Discuss drug safety and how drugs are tested today.
Activity: Cards /cut-outs to sequence stages in drug testing and trialling and purpose of each stage. plain why drugs need to be tested before they can be prescribed.
•Describe the main steps in testing a new drug.
•Explain the terms placebo and double-blind trial. scuss: Brainstorm – what is a drug? Names of medicines.
Activity: Use pictures to relate uses and problems associated with thalidomide.
Research: Research and produce a report on thalidomide – original use, use in pregnant women, current uses. •Define the term ‘drug’.
•Give examples of medical drugs.
•Describe the uses and problems associated with thalidomide.
•Explain how the drug testing procedure was inappropriate. 6.2 Drug testing objectives 6.3 Recreational drugs objectives 6.5 Smoking objectives 6.6 Hard drugs objectives . •Describe and evaluate the effect of statins in cardiovascular disease.
•Name some recreational drugs.
•Describe some effects of caffeine on the body. Statin packaging & past BLY1 exam questions.
Task: Interpret data on statins (links with inherited factors B1.1.1d).
Discuss: Brainstorm on recreational drugs, sort into legal and illegal and discuss why people use them.
HSW: Investigate the effect of caffeine on heart rate or reaction time (see B1.2.1 ‘reaction time experiment’). Caffeine: Coffee / energy drink /coke vs decaf version or water, timer / pulse rate sensor and ruler Be able to explain why a person might become addicted to a recreational drug. Smoking machine to show carbon dioxide and tar content of smoke. Cigarette, smoking machine, limewater, Universal Indicator solution, cotton wool and pump.
Poster to show effects of chemicals in smoke on the body.
Calculate the cost of smoking cigarettes.
Show health warning on packets of cigarettes; video clips of smoking adverts. Why do people smoke? Be able to evaluate the impact of smoking on health.
Be able to use data from a line graph to describe the relationship between birth mass of a baby and the number of cigarettes smoked by the mother. •Evaluate the impact of alcohol & tobacco on health. Be able to give three possible effects of the misuse of alcohol.
Discuss: Discuss effects of alcohol on the body, recommended units for men and women. Calculate number of units of alcohol consumed.
Download alcohol units tracker on NHS site.
Relate smoking and alcohol to NHS costs.
Exhibition of alcoholic drinks with units per measure. •Describe the effects of cannabis on the body.
•Consider the possible progression from recreational to hard drugs.
•Describe the effects of heroin / cocaine addiction and withdrawal symptoms.
Invite outside speaker, eg drugs and alcohol adviser.
Research: Research effects of cannabis on the body.
Interpret data on drug use.
Video: Watch NHS video clip on the dangers of smoking cannabis.
Interpret data on cannabis use and progression to hard drugs.
Video: Watch video clips from NHS site on cocaine use.
Knowledge of specific effects of cannabis on the body is required. Why does a polar bear have a smaller surface area to volume ratio than a camel?
What is mimicry?
Name 3 ways in which cacti are adapted for the arid environment in which they grow
Write your own definition of competition on a post-it note Starter

Think of two advantages and two disadvantages of using indicator species to monitor water and air pollution.

In what circumstances are indicator species useful? You have 20 minutes to fill out the table using information from the water and air pollution sheets.




You now have 5 minutes to look at a case study, and using your knowledge assess the level of pollution.

After 5 minutes you will rotate to the next case study. There are four in total. Know that the presence or absence of indicator species can be used to assess pollution levels.
Give examples of commonly used indicator species and be able to use these to identify pollution levels.
Explain why it is important to be able to assess pollution levels. Learning Objectives 30 seconds to decide… which do you think is cleaner?
How do you know? Which is cleaner? 30 seconds to decide… which do you think is safer to drink?
How could you know? Which would you rather drink? living indicators activity Homework New face on the block Predator/prey Light Mates Food Competing for resources Early flowering plants


Some woodland flowers e.g. ………………. and …………….. compete for water and …………. successfully.

They flower early in the year whilst there are no ………… on the trees in order to get enough light for …………………

The dormant trees take very little ……….. from the soil so they compete for this successfully too. Competition: Animals and plants have to compete for limited resources. The best adapted animals or plants will win and survive. Why do animals and plants compete? Found in woodlands with lots of tall trees
When these trees have leaves, they block out much of the light
Small plants e.g. snowdrop, bluebell flower early in the year when trees still have no leaves
The dormant trees take very little water out of the soil so lots available for small plants
The plants flower, set seeds and die before the trees are in full leaf Why do snowdrops bloom so early? Write a sentence for each plant in your book C B A What are these plants competing for? What happens if they lose? What are the animals competing for in each picture? Write the subtitle in your book and match the words to the definitions. Write in full! Water

Light

Minerals & nutrients from the soil

Space What do plants compete for? Plants shed seeds far away so the parent plant is not in competition with its offspring

To keep tissues rigid and supported and for photosynthesis

So plants can make all the chemicals they need in their cells

For photosynthesis. Making food using the energy from the sun Practical Need graph paper! Distance (km) No. mayfly larvae No. sludgeworms 1
2
3 3
11
23 20
14
7 Josh recorded the number of species in water samples taken at different distances from a sewage outlet. Sewage contains many microbes which use up oxygen.

1. Draw a line graph to show these results
2. What would he have to do to make this a fair test?
3. What do these results tell you about the organisms?
4. Why would sewage decrease the number of mayfly larvae? Sulfur dioxide 1. Where does it come from?
2. What do high levels of sulfur dioxide indicate?
3. What can be used as a living indicator of sulfur dioxide levels?
4. Do you think levels of sulfur dioxide have increased or decreased since 1970? Why? 1. Draw a pyramid of biomass for the following organisms on Sillan's farm TO SCALE;

Fox (5kg), carrots (100kg), fox (1kg), snails (50kg)

2. Copy the following;
Pyramids of biomass are ALWAYS a pyramid shape
The producer ALWAYS goes at the bottom
Energy is lost at each trophic level

3. How is energy lost??? Task 1 Task 3 Complete the worksheet.
Answers in your books - full sentences
growth heat short/long food chains faeces increases/decreases respiration some/all

Energy is transferred along _____________ from one stage to the next but not all of the energy available to organisms at one stage can be absorbed by organisms at the next one. The amount of available energy ____________from one stage to the next.

Some of the available energy goes into ____________ and the production of offspring. This energy becomes available to the next stage, but most of the available energy is used up in other ways. For example:
•energy released by ____________ is used for movement and other life processes, and is eventually lost as ___________ to the surroundings

•energy is lost in waste materials, such as _____________.

____________ of the energy used in these ways returns to the environment, and is not available to the next stage.
Most food chains are pretty _____________. There are rarely more than four stages, because a lot of energy is lost at each stage. Task 2 Energy transfer Task 2 Factors affecting decay;
Complete the card sort
Copy the table into your books


Complete the higher level questions on biomass, energy transfer and decay Task 3 Task 1 Define decomposer & detritus Build a calorimeter
EQUIPMENT
Heat proof mat
Large can
Small can
Hammer
Nail
Oil
Thermometer
Needle
Cork
Matches
Glass rod
Biomass to measure You are going to use this equipment to build a calorimeter.
1. What is a calorimeter used for?
2. Draw a diagram of your calorimeter
3. Explain your method.
4. List your safety precautions.
5. When this is approved you may start. Key words response
behaviour
central nervous system
peripheral nervous system
nerve impulse
neuron Just write the words down.
You will define them later. cell body
synapse
nerve fibre
sensory neuron
motor neuron
relay neuron
direction of impulse
stimulus
response Add these words to your diagram sense receptor stimulus List all 5 senses and complete the table Task 2 name response time Measure your response times Task 3 Key words stimulus/stimuli
response
sense organ Write down our 5 senses Finished? Pick one sense. How does it protect us & increase our chances of survival? Task 1 Listen carefully and label the diagram with the following words; central nervous system (CNS)
brain
spinal cord
peripheral nervous system (PNS)
nerves What is the difference between the CNS and the PNS? The central nervous system (CNS) coordinates all the information it receives from the body.
The peripheral nervous system (PNS) is a network of nerves that connects the CNS to every part of the body. •Describe the functions of the main structures in the nervous system.
•Explain the importance of being able to respond to environmental changes. Task 2 1. What is a nerve?

2. How do nerves transmit information?

3. Why do we have a nervous system? Describe an action today that....

....you did not have to think about and you have never had to learn to do.
....you have learnt to do but you can now do without thinking.
.....you had to think about while you were doing it. starter 4. Why is it important to be able to respond to environmental changes? Give examples Sequence a reflex action from stimulus to response.
Explain the importance of reflex actions and be able to give examples. Explain the importance of reflex actions and be able to give examples.
Describe the pathway of a nerve impulse in a reflex response and explain the roles of the structures involved.
Explain the role of chemicals at synapses.
Describe different ways of measuring reaction time.
Be able to sequence a reflex action from stimulus to response. Task 2 Task 3 The nervous system uses____________ to allow fast responses. Reflex actions are________________so they are even faster.

The_______________isn't involved in a reflex arc. In a reflex arc an impulse travels from a _____________neuron to a _____________neuron in the ___________ which links directly to a _____________neuron.

In a reflex arc no time is wasted thinking about the right response. sensory motor relay automatic
spinal cord electrical impulses brain The reflex arc Task 1 Can you complete the card sort?
Hint - the reflex starts with the stimulus and ends with the response.... Simple human reflexes
Refer to the information sheet. Answer questions 1,2 & 3. Task 4 Where is the receptor? Where is the effector? oxygen
glucose
carbon dioxide
water
urea Input/output/both? Why it is controlled Substances controlled by the body Task 1 Input Needed for respiration Can you think of other examples? Task 2 Controlling water levels What happens if his water levels are too high or too low? Work out how much water Ronaldo has to drink to balance his water level? sweat 1.2L
food 200ml
urine 750ml
respiration 1L
exhaled air 500ml
faeces 500ml
drink???

Hint: work out which are inputs and which are outputs What do you know already? What is our normal body temperature?
Name 3 ways our bodies reduce our temperature.
What is an enzyme?
Why does our temperature have to be controlled? Task 1 Controlling temperature Too hot Too cold 1.
2.
3. 1.
2.
3. what happens? why? what happens? why? Task 2 FACTS
1. Enzymes are chemicals in the body that speed up reactions. They only work at certain temperatures.
2. Liver contains an enzyme.
3. This enzyme breaks down hydrogen peroxide and produces oxygen gas.

EQUIPMENT
Liver (frozen, raw and cooked)
Hydrogen peroxide solution Design an experiment to investigate the effect of temperature on enzymes.
Discuss your ideas with a partner and write down your method.
What do you think will happen? Enzymes Experiment to investigate the effect of temperature on enzymes 1. Work in pairs.
2. Put goggles on and stools under tables.
3. Collect 3 test tubes and a rack.
4. Add to each;
observations

TT1 Frozen liver
TT2 Raw liver
TT3 Cooked liver

5. Add 10ml hydrogen peroxide to each.
6. Record your observations.
7. Write your conclusion
8. Evaluate your experiment Task 3 unscramble zmeney ronue uusitsml eexflr eonperss ooemrnsh •Explain what hormones are.
•Give some changes that occur at puberty and link with secretion of hormones.
•Name the hormones that control the menstrual cycle and state the glands that produce them. What changes in your body during puberty? Why? How? What's a gland? What causes this to happen? Task 1 1. Define the word hormone
2. What is a gland?
3. Where is the pituitary gland?
4.How long is a female menstrual cycle?
5.What happens during the cycle? Task 3 Using the information sheet describe what happens at each of the 4 stages of the menstrual cycle. Write the information under your diagram. Task 2 Use the information sheet to complete the word sort and stick it into your book.
Match the gland to the correct hormone and its effect. The hormones that control the menstrual cycle. The menstrual cycle Task 1 If a couple have problems conceiving (having a baby) what are the possible causes? Use the internet to research human fertility and complete the poster.
Write detailed answers and try to get to grade A ICT Lesson Task 2 Use the worksheet on phototropism.
Grade C - Qs 1,2 & 3
Grade B - Qs 4 & 5
Grade C - Q 6
Use the selection of images provided to illustrate your answers. Task 2 1. As selective weedkillers
2. Growing from cuttings
3. Controlling the ripening of fruit
4. Controlling dormancy There are 4 ways that plant hormones can be used commercially.




1. Divide your page into 4 and write a sub-title on each section.
2. Each group will focus on one way and teach the rest of the group.
3. You then listen carefully to complete your table...... 1. As selective weedkillers 4. Controlling dormancy 3. Controlling the ripening of fruit 2. Growing from cuttings Commercial uses of plant hormones 1 What do the following words mean?




2 Why did the German drug company expect to make a lot of money from thalidomide?

3 What percentage of all affected embryos died before birth?
What percentage of all affected embryos died after birth?

4 How is thalidomide thought to cause limb defects?
Using this information, explain how it might work to reduce the size of some cancers.

5 Why are women banned from entering thalidomide factories in the UK today?

6 How do you think thalidomide has affected the way in which drugs are tested and marketed today? The thalidomide story Answer in full sentences in your books antibiotic
sedative
phocomelia
teratogen 6.4 Alcohol objectives Smoking machine to show carbon dioxide and tar content of smoke. Cigarette, smoking machine, limewater, Universal Indicator solution, cotton wool and pump.
Poster to show effects of chemicals in smoke on the body.
Calculate the cost of smoking cigarettes.
Show health warning on packets of cigarettes; video clips of smoking adverts. Why do people smoke? Be able to evaluate the impact of smoking on health.
Be able to use data from a line graph to describe the relationship between birth mass of a baby and the number of cigarettes smoked by the mother. •Evaluate the impact of alcohol on health. Be able to give three possible effects of the misuse of alcohol.
Discuss: Discuss effects of alcohol on the body, recommended units for men and women. Calculate number of units of alcohol consumed.
Download alcohol units tracker on NHS site.
Relate smoking and alcohol to NHS costs.
Exhibition of alcoholic drinks with units per measure. Task 1 Copy the diagram of the nerve cell.
Label it. Neuron
Cell body
Nucleus
Nerve impulse
Stimulus
Response Finished? Draw a graph to show your results The reflex arc http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/science/aqa/nervesandhormones/controlinthehumanbodyrev2.shtml Hormones Starter Write the word equations for photosynthesis and respiration.

Where do they take place? Task 3
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