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HOW DO YOU INTERPRET FLOWCHARTS ?

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Antonette Quiles

on 22 September 2013

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Transcript of HOW DO YOU INTERPRET FLOWCHARTS ?

HOW DO YOU INTERPRET FLOWCHARTS ?

* will help you understand your process and uncover ways to improve it only if
you use it to analyze what is happening.

Interpreting your Flowchart will help
you to :

 Determine who is involved in the process.
 Form theories about root causes.
 Identify ways to streamline the process.
 Determine how to implement changes to the process.
 Locate cost-added-only steps.
 Provide training on how the process works or should work.
sequence of steps that will help you through
an orderly analysis of your flowchart.
Step 1
-
Examine each process step for the following conditions that indicate a need to improve the process:
Bottlenecks

>These points in the process where it slows down may be caused by redundant or unnecessary steps, rework, lack of capacity, or other factors.
Weak links
>These are steps where problems occur because of inadequate training of process workers, equipment that needs to be repaired or replaced, or insufficient technical documentation. "Inform the drill leader and improvise" is one of the weak links.
Poorly defined steps. Steps which are not well-defined may be interpreted and performed in a different way by each person involved, leading to process variation. "Improvise" is a poorly defined step in the weak link cited above.
Step 2 - Examine each decision symbol. You may want to collect data on how often there
is a "yes" or "no" answer at decision points marked by a diamond shaped symbol. If most
decisions go one way rather than the other, you may be able to remove this decision point.
Step 3 - Examine each rework loop. Processes with numerous checks generate rework and waste. Examine the activities preceding the rework loop and identify those that need to be improved. Look for ways to shorten or eliminate the loop.
Step 4 - Examine each activity symbol. Does the step help build a key quality characteristic into the end product? If not, consider eliminating it.
Types of flowchart
Besides the three levels of detail used to categorize Flowcharts, there are three main
types of flowcharts namely , linear, deployment, and opportunity. The level of detail
can be depicted as macro, mini, or micro
Linear Flowchart

> is a diagram that displays the sequence of
work steps that make up a process. This tool can help identify rework and redundant or unnecessary steps within a process.
Deployment Flowchart

> shows the actual process flow
and identifies the people or groups involved at each step. Horizontal lines define customer-supplier relationships. This type of chart shows where the people or groups fit into the process sequence, and how they relate to one another throughout the process.
How do we construct a linear flowchart?
1. Define the process to be flow charted, and the purpose for flow charting it.
2. Assemble the right people to develop the flowchart—those operators, technicians, or office workers who are actually involved in the process.
3. Establish process boundaries—the starting and ending points.
* Identify the major activities or sub processes that are included in the process.
* Determine what is not included in the scope of the process to remove any doubt or confusion about the boundaries. This may also help establish the scope of related processes.
4. List the steps, activities, and decisions to be charted. If your team is not sure about a step, mark it to be investigated later.
5. Put the steps in chronological sequence. Sometimes it's easier to start with the last step and work back to the first step.
6. Assign flowchart symbols such as boxes, diamonds, and triangles.
7. Review and title the Flowchart.
QUESTIONS :
Directions : Arrange the following steps in developing a flowchart . Put the number on a sheet of paper.

____________Define the process to be flow charted, and the purpose for flow charting it.
____________Establish process boundaries - the starting and ending points.
____________Put the steps in chronological sequence. Sometimes it's easier to start
with the last step and work back to the first step.
____________Assign flowchart symbols such as boxes, diamonds, and triangles.
____________Review and title the flowchart.
____________Assemble the right people to develop the flowchart— those operators, technicians, or office workers who are actually involved in the process.
____________List the steps, activities, and decisions to be charted. If your team is not sure about a step, mark it to be investigated later.
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