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White Man's Burden - Rudyard Kipling

An analysis on the views,trends, and concepts conveyed in the poem
by

Clara Quan

on 9 September 2011

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Transcript of White Man's Burden - Rudyard Kipling

A White Man's Burden -Rudyard Kipling Take up the White Man's burden--
Send forth the best ye breed--
Go bind your sons to exile
To serve your captives' need;
To wait in heavy harness,
On fluttered folk and wild--
Your new-caught, sullen peoples,
Half-devil and half-child. A White Man's Burden Take up the White Man's burden--
In patience to abide,
To veil the threat of terror
And check the show of pride;
By open speech and simple,
An hundred times made plain
To seek another's profit,
And work another's gain. Take up the White Man's burden--
The savage wars of peace--
Fill full the mouth of Famine
And bid the sickness cease;
And when your goal is nearest
The end for others sought,
Watch sloth and heathen Folly
Bring all your hopes to nought. Take up the White Man's burden--
No tawdry rule of kings,
But toil of serf and sweeper--
The tale of common things.
The ports ye shall not enter,
The roads ye shall not tread,
Go mark them with your living,
And mark them with your dead. Take up the White Man's burden--
And reap his old reward:
The blame of those ye better,
The hate of those ye guard--
The cry of hosts ye humour
(Ah, slowly!) toward the light:--
"Why brought he us from bondage,
Our loved Egyptian night?" Take up the White Man's burden--
Ye dare not stoop to less--
Nor call too loud on Freedom
To cloke (1) your weariness;
By all ye cry or whisper,
By all ye leave or do,
The silent, sullen peoples
Shall weigh your gods and you. Take up the White Man's burden--
Have done with childish days--
The lightly proferred laurel, (2)
The easy, ungrudged praise.
Comes now, to search your manhood
Through all the thankless years
Cold, edged with dear-bought wisdom,
The judgment of your peers! Historical Setting The "White Man's Burden" was first written for Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee 1899 but Kipling changed the text to reflect the American colonisation of the Phillipines after the Spanish American war Inspiration are comes from the things around us, whether it be ideas, beliefs, or trends So what inspired Rudyard Kipling? The poem can be interpreted in 2 opposing views prevalent at the time Imperialistic view Philanthropic view ? ? ? ? ? "Prophet of British Imperialism" A rhetorical command to colonize and rule other nations New Imperialism Commonly used to describe the intense rivalry between nations to colonize to increase a nation’s power and wealth and motivated by their ideas of their own racial and intellectual superiority to the peoples whom sought to control. “To seek another’s profit, /And work another’s gain” Social Darwinism Links to another idea moral obligation and duty "The judgement of your peers" the desire to christianise "half devil half child[ren]" and the "sullen peoples" of "inferior" nations. Christian missionary movements being quite active during this period in India, Africa, and other British and European colonies Different
perspectives Philanthropy There are many ideas linked to philanthropy, such as: Philanthropy, christianizatian, and duty as imperial powers were prevalent indeas at the time and were strongly conveyed in Kiplings poem, but others thought otherwise A few weeks after the publication of "White man's
burden" , the "Brown Man's Burden" by Henry Labouchere
appeared. Pile on the brown man’s burden
To gratify your greed;
Go, clear away the “niggers”
Who progress would impede;
Be very stern, for truly
‘Tis useless to be mild
With new-caught, sullen peoples,
Half devil and half child. Pile on the brown man’s burden,
Compel him to be free;
Let all your manifestoes
Reek with philanthropy.
And if with heathen folly
He dares your will dispute,
Then, in the name of freedom,
Don’t hesitate to shoot Yet they could still be connected with each other Justification with the act of philanthropy Or not...
As it was taken by some people as poem portraying violent imperialism Perhaps a parody....? AHAHAHAH! The Black Man's Burden Pile on the Black Man’s Burden.
'Tis nearest at your door;
Why heed long bleeding Cuba,
or dark Hawaii’s shore? Hail ye your fearless armies,
Which menace feeble folks
Who fight with clubs and arrows
and brook your rifle’s smoke.
Pile on the Black Man’s Burden
His wail with laughter drown You’ve sealed the Red Man’s problem,
And will take up the Brown,
In vain ye seek to end it,
With bullets, blood or death
Better by far defend it
With honor’s holy breath. Take up the White Man's burden--
Send forth the best ye breed--
Go bind your sons to exile
To serve your captives' need;
To wait in heavy harness,
On fluttered folk and wild--
Your new-caught, sullen peoples,
Half-devil and half-child. "Take up the White Man's burden-
And reap his old reward"
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