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Stephanie Williams ePortfolio

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stephanie williams

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Transcript of Stephanie Williams ePortfolio

Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
Table Of Contents
Teaching Philosophy Slide 3
Context of teaching Slides 4 - 12
National Professional Standards for Teachers
Standard 1 Slide 13
Standard 2 Slide 14
Standard 3 Slide 15
Standard 4 Slide 16
Standard 5 Slide 17
Standard 6 Slide 18

Appendices
Appendix 1 Slide 19
Appendix 2 Slide 20
Appendix 3 Slide 21
Appendix 4 Slide 22
Appendix 5 Slide 23
Appendix 6 Slide 24
Appendix 7 Slide 25
Appendix 8 Slide 26
Appendix 9 Slide 27
Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
Teaching Philosophy
I believe that effective teaching occurs when the teacher is engaging, knowledgeable and enthusiastic about the subjects they are delivering and the learning of students in their classroom.

I believe that good teaching is inclusive of all students within the classroom, and requires scaffolding and extension so that every student is in the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD), every lesson.
I believe that good teaching is flexible, dynamic and – at times – experimental!

I believe that good teaching support students with earning difficulties through the implementation of a differentiation framework in which teachers can differentiate the curriculum focus through adapting the content, process and product, changing these to focus on the students readiness, interest and learning profile

I believe that good teaching incorporates the constructivist concept, in which the learner is placed at the centre of all teaching endeavours, and all learning environments and activities are structured to help learners CONSTRUCT knowledge rather than simply absorbing it.

I hope to design and teach lessons that incorporate different Key Learning Areas and ideas, in the form of Rich Tasks, that allow meaningful learning to occur as students are able to relate the knowledge and activities taught in the classroom with their own lives and experiences, to increase engagement and understanding.

I hope to have a happy, open and respectful classroom environment, and I aim to bring a lot of energy into my classroom – if I can’t get enthusiastic about the subjects I am teaching, how can I expect my students to?!

I will encourage students to celebrate and share their culture, customs and heritage in the classroom, and will invite and welcome parental participation and involvement.

I will use a behaviour management plan to ensure students explicitly details the strategies and the educational adjustments that teachers use in their classrooms with regard to the needs of their students. The action plan will incorporate the Positive Learning Framework, a three phase model of behaviour management, with the first two phases focusing on Prevention, and the third phase on correction
Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
Context of teaching
I have experienced a diverse range of different schools and students during my practical experiences as a student teacher. I taught at a private Lutheran secondary college in Wodonga, a large and challenging secondary school in Queanbeyan, and a friendly and welcoming High School in isolated rural Australia. My Primary School experiences ranged from a large, urban public school to a tiny two teacher school that was extremely community orientated. I think that skills I learned at this wide range of different schools, communities and contexts has provided me with tools to effectively teach in many environments

Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
Context of teaching
PRIMARY SCHOOL PLACEMENTS
Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
Context of teaching
ALBURY WEST PUBLIC SCHOOL

Albury West is a primary school in a medium to low socio economic area. Class sizes ranged from 20 – 27 students with 24 students in the Year 1 classroom I was in. Students were eager to learn and there was a moderate amount of parental involvement.
As it was my first professional experience, I did a lot of observation to begin with. I was responsible for assisting the classroom teacher with helping the students with activities including reading, writing, mathematics problems. I would read to the class each day and was responsible for supervising the students who did not participate in scripture each week and creating fun learning activities for them to do in that 90 minutes.


Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
Context of teaching
BURRUMBUTTOCK PUBLIC SCHOOL

A very small, two teacher school where years 3,4,5 and 6 were all in the same classroom. While at first this was daunting, with so many different abilities and stages in one room, it taught me how to effectively set differentiated tasks and put in place a behaviour management plan to ensure all students stayed focused and learning while I was working with another year group. The students were all from farms and had a pragmatic and logical outlook on life and learning. They preferred all activities to be meaningful and relevant to their daily lives and asked for things to be explained in contexts they were familiar with. All students spent a lot of time in the Kitchen Garden, where they cultivated and learned about plants, then harvested and used the plants in cooking once a week, and used the knowledge they had gained in the Kitchen Garden across a variety of curriculum areas – English, Science, Mathematics, HSIE. In this school I was responsible for planning and implementing all lessons and activities.
Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
Context of teaching
BOMBALA PUBLIC SCHOOL
A small, rural school with 16 students in the year 1 classroom I taught in. There were 3 students with learning disabilities who required scaffolding and differentiation of tasks and lessons, and 2 students who required extension work.
I learnt how to modify and differentiate lessons and activities to suit all students in the classroom and used inclusive teaching practices.
I was responsible for plannign and implementng lessons in English, Mathematics, HSIE, Science and creative arts, and also helped organise and supervise at the athletics carnival.
Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
Context of teaching
SECONDARY SCHOOL PLACEMENTS
Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
Context of teaching
VICTORY LUTHERAN COLLEGE
Victory Lutheran was a private secondary college with a mostly high socio economic student base. Students were diligent and well behaved, and there was community expectation for good behaviour and results. There was a high level of pastoral care, with chapel 3 times a week.

Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
Context of teaching

BOMBALA HIGH SCHOOL
Bombala High, although having only 120 students, had a wide range of student abilities. All different abilities – academic, sporting, artistic – were nurtured and celebrated in this very close environment. Students rarely wore uniform, and were occasionally cheeky but always respectful and friendly and caring towards each other. My most heart-warming teaching experienced occurred at the athletics carnival when a boy with severe disabilities ran in a race and the entire school cheered him on with genuine enthusiasm
Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
Context of teaching
KARABAR HIGH SCHOOL

Karabar was a large high school in Queanbeyan, NSW, and was quite challenging. My first experience teaching in a large and urban school, I was surprised by the rudeness and misbehaviour of many of the students – especially those in lower grades. However, with the implementation of a behaviour management plan and a change of teaching techniques I found that there were many intelligent and lively students capable of achieving good results and undertaking meaningful learning. The school was in a low socioeconomic area with little parental or community involvement.

Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
National Professional Standards
Standard 1: Know students and how they learn
Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
National Professional Standards
Standard 2: Know the content and how to teach it

Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
National Professional Standards
Standard 3: Plan for and implement effective teaching and learning:

Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
National Professional Standards
Standard 4. Create and maintain supportive and safe
learning environments

Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
National Professional Standards
Standard 5: Assess, provide feedback and report on
student learning

Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
National Professional Standards
Standard 6: Engage in professional learning

Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
Know students and how they learn
At the beginning of my course, I had a generalised view of students. However after the past 4 years of study, research and professional experience I have learnt that students in every school differ in terms of religion, culture, background, and physical and intellectual abilities. I learnt how to modify and differentiate pre planed lesson, and also to incorporate knowledge of the students in my classes into the development of my lessons and activities, to ensure I had experiences to engage and support the wide variety of learners.

1.1
Physical, social and intellectual development and characteristics of students
I observed classes and consulted parents and teachers about the different characteristics of students that I would be teaching, so that I could be fully prepared to deliver lessons that would allow them to achieve learning outcomes

1.2
Understand how students learn
Through my knowledge of the different types of learners, I made sure my lessons contained activities and experiences that catered for every style of learner – visual, auditory, kinaesthetic and read-write learners – so that every student in the class has equal opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and to enjoy the topics being taught.

1.3
Students with diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds
During one of my preofessional eperiences, I taught a Bhutanese refugee who was Level B2 for Reading and Responding, and Level 1 for Communication and Cultural understanding on the ESL scales. During a lesson when the class was reading a picture book and then sharing with the class, I had Jamin read ‘Mirror’ by Jeannie Baker, which relied on her using the universal visual illustrations and did not put her at a disadvantage. Because she enjoyed the book so much without having to worry about not understanding the text, she eagerly contributed to conversation after reading.

1.4
Strategies for teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students
I have taught Indigenous Australian students in most of the schools where I have completed placement class, which has allowed mw to develop my knowledge of their linguistic, cultural and social background. I was helping a year 1 indigenous boy with his reading and found that by engaging him in conversation about the story, and allowing him to tell his own story, he became very engaged with the task and subsequently his attention and accuracy improved.

1.5
Differentiate teaching to meet the specific learning needs of students across the full
range of abilities. and 1.6 Strategies to support full participation of students with disability

In classroom, I had one 3 students with learning disabilities who required scaffolding and differentiation of tasks and lessons, and 2 students who required extension work. I used flexible grouping - where students can work with other students at a similar ability as themselves, to allow the teacher to give more relevant and personalised instruction during group work - and tiered activities where a central concept or curriculum area is presented and discussed as a class, and once it is understood the students have the option to choose between a number of different relating tasks of varying complexity. As the outcomes and activities differ, each student is being set up for success in learning at their own levels.




Know students and how they learn
At the beginning of my course, I had a generalised view of students. However after the past 4 years of study, research and professional experience I have learnt that students in every school differ in terms of religion, culture, background, and physical and intellectual abilities. I learnt how to modify and differentiate pre planed lesson, and also to incorporate knowledge of the students in my classes into the development of my lessons and activities, to ensure I had experiences to engage and support the wide variety of learners.

1.1
Physical, social and intellectual development and characteristics of students
I observed classes and consulted parents and teachers about the different characteristics of students that I would be teaching, so that I could be fully prepared to deliver lessons that would allow them to achieve learning outcomes

1.2
Understand how students learn
Through my knowledge of the different types of learners, I made sure my lessons contained activities and experiences that catered for every style of learner – visual, auditory, kinaesthetic and read-write learners – so that every student in the class has equal opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and to enjoy the topics being taught.

1.3
Students with diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds
During one of my preofessional eperiences, I taught a Bhutanese refugee who was Level B2 for Reading and Responding, and Level 1 for Communication and Cultural understanding on the ESL scales. During a lesson when the class was reading a picture book and then sharing with the class, I had Jamin read ‘Mirror’ by Jeannie Baker, which relied on her using the universal visual illustrations and did not put her at a disadvantage. Because she enjoyed the book so much without having to worry about not understanding the text, she eagerly contributed to conversation after reading.

1.4
Strategies for teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students
I have taught Indigenous Australian students in most of the schools where I have completed placement class, which has allowed mw to develop my knowledge of their linguistic, cultural and social background. I was helping a year 1 indigenous boy with his reading and found that by engaging him in conversation about the story, and allowing him to tell his own story, he became very engaged with the task and subsequently his attention and accuracy improved.

1.5
Differentiate teaching to meet the specific learning needs of students across the full
range of abilities. and 1.6 Strategies to support full participation of students with disability

In classroom, I had one 3 students with learning disabilities who required scaffolding and differentiation of tasks and lessons, and 2 students who required extension work. I used flexible grouping - where students can work with other students at a similar ability as themselves, to allow the teacher to give more relevant and personalised instruction during group work - and tiered activities where a central concept or curriculum area is presented and discussed as a class, and once it is understood the students have the option to choose between a number of different relating tasks of varying complexity. As the outcomes and activities differ, each student is being set up for success in learning at their own levels.
(Appendix 9)



Standard 2 – Know the content and how to teach it

2.1 Content and teaching strategies of the teaching area
As I am passionate and informed about my specialist areas, I was able to bring a substantial knowledge of the content and subjects areas to many of the lessons I taught. I believe my knowledge and enthusiasm, as well as my variety of teaching strategies, lead to student engagement and meaningful learning within these lessons.
(Appendix 1)

2.2 Content selection and organisation
I was able to choose and integrate relevant content into all lessons, so that students would achieve curriculum outcomes.

2.3 Curriculum, assessment and reporting
My unit and lesson planning were based on the NSW Board of Studies Syllabuses and the Australian National Curriculum. These frameworks have provided rationale for teaching, guidance in selecting content, suggested sequences for learning and also expected goals and outcomes

2.4 Understand and respect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to promote reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians
I believe that a classroom should safe space where all students, regardless of race or background, are supported in their growth and development and learning. In order for this to happen, diversity and Aboriginality must be celebrated. The happened during my secondary professional experience at Karabar High School, which coincided with NAIDOC week. All students participated in dancing, singer and ceremonies, and a Indigenous Australian Elder spoke to the students about reconciliation and recognition of indigeneity.

2.5 Literacy and numeracy strategies
When teaching a year 1 classroom with a wide range of abilities, I realised that it was important for students to understand that literacy was more than just the ability to read and comprehend. For this reason, I developed ‘Y Charts’ so students could demonstrate their ability to be literate in visual, tactile and audible areas
(Appendix 2)

2.6 Information and Communication Technology (ICT)
I used ICT in almost every lesson I taught – from using the interactive whiteboard for activities and showing multimedia, to iPads for literacy activities for my year 1 classes, and having a year 11 class create a Prezi presentation on the novel they were studying (Appendix). I also used Prezi and other ICT as a teaching tool to increase student engagement and interaction
Appendx 3)
(

3.1 Establish challenging learning goals
At the beginning of every lesson, I set learning goals for the class and either wrote them on the board or discussed them verbally. I ensured that the learning goals I set were specific and unambiguous, that they represented short term outcomes related to the relevant curriculum, and that they were difficult enough for students to be working at the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) in each lesson. When necessary, I adjusted goals for student with learning difficulties or those who were advanced.

3.2 Plan, structure and sequence learning programs
For my professional experiences, I planned and implemented lesson sequences where learning built on knowledge and often integrated skills and knowledge across different KLA’s.

3.3 Use teaching strategies
Throughout a large range of lessons across different subjects and key learning areas, I integrated a wide variety of teaching strategies, ICT and different resources so all students – regardless of learning type, level or ability, had a chance to both gain knowledge and understanding of the lesson, and also engage with the topics being taught.

3.4 Select and use resources
I utilised a wide range of resources for all different subjects, including iPads for literacy, a range of materials to create mousetraps in Science and Technology
(Appendix 4)
and I also made good use of the SmartBoard for both primary and secondary classroom. If I could not find an appropriate resource for the lesson I was teaching, I would create resources. In my year 1 classroom I made ‘Shape Bingo’ boards by putting all the shapes we were learning about in geometry onto bingo boards, laminating them and using them to great success in a mathematics lesson.

3.5 Use effective classroom communication
It is all too easy to focus on primarily using verbal communication in the classroom – however, integrating different types of communication can support student learning. I demonstrated this through use of eye contact, use of hand gestures, use of pictorial representations, and my tone of voice

3.6 Evaluate and improve teaching programs
Most of the evaluation I did of my teaching programs and strategies occurred after supervising teacher feedback, as well as my observation and judgement of student engagement, understanding of topic and their feedback or comments about the class.

3.7 Engage parents/ carers in the educative process
I was fortunate enough to do many of my professional experiences in rural schools with close and supportive families and parents, who had a lot of involvement in the classroom and the school. I was also fortunate enough to sit in on several parent teacher interviews and conference, both formal and informal. At Karabar High School, which was a lot larger and more urban, I experienced how teachers and faculty member contacted parents via email, to keep them informed of results, reminders and behavioural issues. I thought this was an excellent means of communication and engagement with parents and carers, and it had positive result.

4.1 Support student participation
In both primary and high school classrooms, I have endeavoured to support student participation and cooperation through using games to begin or sum up or finish a lesson or learning activity. For secondary school classrooms, I liked to play Frisbee, and integrate relevant topic related questions into the game. I also used a lot of positive reinforcement to encourage participation in all year groups/

4.2 Manage classroom activities
I used clear, concise and audible instructions, as well as explicit expectations and engaging activities throughout lessons to manage classroom learning and behaviour during activities
(appendix 6)

4.3 Manage challenging behaviour
During one of my secondary school practical experiences I experienced some very challenging behaviour from year 8 boys. I managed this through effective movement around the room and the use of a calm and unemotional tone of voice when dealing with bahvourial issues
(appendix 5)

4.4 Maintain student safety
I made sure that students safety was maintained throughout all lessons, including physical safety, emotional safety and sun safety.

4.5 Use ICT safely, responsibly and ethically
Before any lesson I supervised that contained online research, I spent time searching for all the common terms and phrases that would be looked up to make sure no inappropriate websites would be inadvertently shown. I also discussed firewalls and school blocking software with my observing teacher, discussed expectations and ICT responsibilities with the class at the beginning of each lesson, and carefully monitored to ensure I was aware of what they were accessing, to allow me to take appropriate mitigating action where appropriate.

5.1 Assess student learning
At the beginning of each of my Professional Experiences I would observe and discuss with the supervising teacher the assessment techniques used, to get an idea of how assessment was done in each different classroom. When teaching lessons, I used a lot of formative assessment – especially questioning – to ascertain student understand and modify my activities accordingly.
(Appendix 7)
I did not use much summative assessment due to usually coming in part way through a unit of work, but I did develop and implement quizzes and tests where appropriate

5.2 Provide feedback to students on their learning
I provided a lot of positive reinforcement and constructive feedback to students including verbal digital and written feedback. Feedback was based on criteria and curriculum outcomes, and was aimed towards improving future learning and understanding.

5.3 Make consistent and comparable judgements
I used rubrics and matrixes to ensure all assessment and judgement were consistent.. I either obtained theses from supervising teacher or created my own based on curriculum outcomes and indicators.

5.4 Interpret student data
I did not have an opportunity in my professional experiences to interpret student data.

5.5 Report on student achievement
While I did not write any official end of semester reports or conduct parents teacher interviews as a practicum teacher, I did unofficially reprt on student engagement and participation with parents during open day and at other times, and also marked and commented on student work samples from both primary and secondary schools.

Standard 6 – Engage in professional learning

6.1 Identify and plan professional learning needs
During my professional experience, I set and worked towards a variety of teaching goals, with my associate teachers monitoring my progress and advising me how to adjust or amend my practices and strategies to best achieve these professional goals.
(Appendix 8)

6.2 Engage in professional learning and improve practice
I improved my teaching knowledge and practices by participating in weekly staff meetings and workshops at Karabar High School

6.3 Engage with colleagues and improve practice
I was fortunate to have very positive relationships with each of my associate teachers during my professional experiences. I engaged with my colleagues by attending all meetings and staff events, by seeking guidance and advice, and by interacting with them on a personal level to develop relationships.

APPENDIX 1
Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
APPENDIX 2
Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
APPENDIX 3
Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
APPENDIX 4
Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
APPENDIX 5
Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
APPENDIX 6
Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
APPENDIX 7
Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
APPENDIX 8
Stephanie Williams - Teaching Portfolio
APPENDIX 9
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