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Seventh Grade Curriculum Map

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Ryan Everhart

on 9 March 2013

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Transcript of Seventh Grade Curriculum Map

Structure and Function:
Cells, Organs and Organisms Properties of Matter
and Earth's Structure Atomic structure
of matter Crosscutting
Concepts Scientific
Core Ideas Practices Science &
Engineering
Knowledge Mental
& Physical
Skills Real World
Applications 7th Grade
Science
Curriculum Asking questions and defining problems
Creating and using models
Planning and conducting investigations
Analyzing and interpreting data
Using mathematical thinking
Constructing explanations and designing solutions
Engaging in evidence based argument
Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information When students learn the practices and concepts that cut across the science and engineering fields, they make connections that allow them to apply their knowledge to a broad range of situations and experiences. Patterns
Cause and effect: Mechanism and explanation
Scale, proportion, and quantity
Systems and system models
Energy and matter: Flows, cycles, and conservation
Structure and function
Stability and change Matter and its interactions
Motion and stability: Forces and interactions
Energy
From molecules to organisms: Structures and processes
Heredity: Inheritance and variation of traits
Biological evolution: Unity and diversity
Earth's systems
Links among engineering, technology, science, and society Where Scientific Practices and Core Ideas come together, students develop the cognitive and practical skills necessary for scientific achievement in later academic coursework and in career fields like medicine, research, and engineering When students learn both the broad crosscutting themes foundational to all observable structures and processes as well as detailed information and applications from the various disciplines of science, they equip themselves with the knowledge base necessary for success in future science coursework and careers in medicine, engineering, and technology. Seventh Grade Science This science course is built on a framework of scientific and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas.

My goal is to tap into my students' innate sense of wonder and curiosity about the universe and direct it to help them gain the scientific knowledge and literacy necessary for individual growth and success in an increasingly technological global society. Structure
and
Classification Inheritance
and the
Environment The Utah 7th Grade Science Standards include many of the core scientific ideas and
all of the crosscutting concepts with an emphasis on structure and function and patterns. Scientific and engineering practices are incorporated within lessons. Week 1 Students will be given several different groups of objects and asked to classify them. Some groups will differ in composition, others will differ in size, weight, texture, and other metrics. Some will be living, others will have once been alive, still others will be non-living.

Students will have a variety of tools to use in their classifications including triple-beam balances, rulers, beakers, microscopes. ILO 1a,c,d,
2c, 6d
Standard V
Obj V-1a,b,d
V-2b,c -Students will learn to measure using appropriate tools and record measurements in tables with appropriate units of measurement.
-Students will reflect on the criteria they chose to classify the objects.
-Students will compare and contrast one of their classification systems to those created by other students to sort the same group of items.
-Students will write a set of generalized rules for each of their classifications.
-They will create arguments to defend their classification systems and learn that there are many acceptable ways to classify things.
-They will be given opportunity to modify their classifications based on the arguments of their peers. week 2 Students will reflect and write about how structure plays a role in classification.
Students will gain experience using scientific language and correct English.
Students will reflect on the classification activities of the last two weeks and recognize the key role that observation plays in scientific classification.
Students will compare and contrast the items above using graphic organizers. ILO 4b,c 6f
Standards I, V
Obj I-2b, V-1c, -Students will be given pictures of a grain of sand, a water droplet, a cell, a rock, a stream, an organ, a mountain, a river, an organism, a continent, an ocean, and a population of organisms.
-They will be asked to classify these in at least three different ways. One of the ways in which students may classify these is living vs. nonliving. Another may be according to building order.
-At the end of the week, I will add pictures of certain organic compounds, water molecules, silicon dioxide, and iron oxide. I will give a brief description of each and allow students to classify them.
-A class discussion will follow about molecules and compounds.
-A presentation will show how rocks can contain organic molecules, water can contain mineral and organic compounds, and living cells depend on water molecules and minerals, showing how areas of science are interrelated and demonstrating that simple classification models are incomplete. Working off of our brief introduction to molecules and before delving deeper into scientific classification, students will develop an understanding of atomic structure.
The atom is the basis of all structure, both living and non-living.
Atoms are too small to see.
Atoms combine to form molecules.
Atoms and molecules make up all matter: living, non-living, solids, liquids, gases. Week 3 Students will be assesed on their ability to create models of atoms and simple molecules and describe the advantages and limitations of those models in writing. ILO 4f
Standard I
Obj I-1a,b,c,d Living Non-living Structure Atoms
Molecules
States of Matter
Particle Motion Organized by particle size and density Organized in
cells and organs
according to
life function Once Living
+ Standards I,II,III,V Sexual
Reproduction Asexual Reproduction Genetic Inheritance Genes
Chromosomes
Traits
Organisms
that reproduce
both ways
Strategy used depends on the Earth's environmental conditions
and the organism's genetic ability Cloning-identical genes
Mitosis only
Organisms that reproduce asexually Mixture of genes
Meiosis and Mitosis
Organisms that
reproduce sexually Standards II, III,IV,V Students in heterogenous groups will research one of the historical atomic models. (Democritus, Dalton, Thompson, Rutherford, Bohr, Electron Chain)
Students will then form homologous groups to create a poster/timeline detailing the models they studied, how the models contributed to our current knowledge of atomic structure and the limitations of those models.
Students will individually choose between writing a paper, creating/performing an act, producing/filming/ showing a video, giving a presentation, or writing and perfoming a poem or song about their model. Week 4 Students will gain a better understanding of atomic structure.
Students will understand the limitations of atomic models.
Students will develop skill in preparing written or oral reports.
Students will gain experience in using scientific language and correct English in oral or written reports.
Students will understand the cumulative nature of science.
Students will see an example of how technology contributed to the progress of science.
Students will be assessed on their paper, act, video, presentation, poem, or song. It must demonstrate understanding of atomic structure, the model they studied and the limitations of that model. ILO 4b,c,d
Standard I
Obj I-1a,d,e Day 1 Students will be asked to write their individual answers to two questions.
“What do you want to know about yourself”
“What do you want to know about the world?”
The areas of interest identified in students' answers to these questions that fall within the Utah 7th Grade Science Core Curriculum will be focused on throughout the year. Some will be included in work that the whole class performs, other areas will be subject matter for individual inquiries. ILO 2a, 2b, 5a -Students will raise questions about objects, events, and processes that may be answered through scientific investigation.
-Throughout the year, students will read and look at science materials that relate to their individual interests. This will foster intrinsically motivated scientific attitudes and interests. Week 1 Students will be given several different groups of objects and asked to classify them. Some groups will differ in composition, others will differ in size, weight, texture, and other metrics. Some will be living, others will have once been alive, still others will be non-living.

Students will have a variety of tools to use in their classifications including triple-beam balances, rulers, beakers, microscopes. ILO 1a,c,d,
2c, 6d
Standard V
Obj V-1a,b,d
V-2b,c -Students will learn to measure using appropriate tools and record measurements in tables with appropriate units of measurement.
-Students will reflect on the criteria they chose to classify the objects.
-Students will compare and contrast one of their classification systems to those created by other students to sort the same group of items.
-Students will write a set of generalized rules for each of their classifications.
-They will create arguments to defend their classification systems and learn that there are many acceptable ways to classify things.
-They will be given opportunity to modify their classifications based on the arguments of their peers. Day 1 Students will be asked to write their individual answers to two questions.
“What skills do you want to have that you have observed in others ?”
“If there were such a thing, what one superpower do you wish you could have?”
The areas of interest identified in students' answers to these questions that fall within the Utah 7th Grade Science Core Curriculum will be focused on throughout the year. Some will be included in work that the whole class performs, other areas will be subject matter for individual inquiries. ILO 2a, 2b, 5a -Students will raise questions about objects, events, and processes that may be answered through scientific investigation.
-Throughout the year, students will read and look at science materials that relate to their individual interests. This will foster intrinsically motivated scientific attitudes and interests. Day 1 Students will be asked to write their individual answers to two questions.
“What three careers are you interested in?” (What do you want to be when you grow up?)
"What environmental problem do you think is the most important for us to fix?"
The areas of interest identified in students' answers to these questions that fall within the Utah 7th Grade Science Core Curriculum will be focused on throughout the year. Some will be included in work that the whole class performs, other areas will be subject matter for individual inquiries. ILO 2a, 2b, 5a -Students will raise questions about objects, events, and processes that may be answered through scientific investigation.
-Throughout the year, students will read and look at science materials that relate to their individual interests. This will foster intrinsically motivated scientific attitudes and interests. Students will learn about the states of matter and the arrangement of particles in each state.
Students will investigate the motion of particles
Students will learn about diffusion and the motion of particles in a liquid and a gas.
Students will design and conduct an experiment to investigate the diffusion of particles in a gas. Week 5 Students will receive formative assessment on their lab work, and their lab reports. Standards assessment will be continual and informal through observations during group work and class discussions. Standards will also be assessed through bellwork writing assignments at the beginning of each class period. ILO 1a,d,e
4a,b 6b,c
Standard I
Obj I-3a,c Students will measure the mass and volume of several liquids and solids.
Students will identify appropriate instruments to make these measurements.
Students will explore the relationship of temperature to volume and reflect on the implications this has on expansion and contraction of materials in buildings, highways, bridges, electronics, and other real world applications.
Students will create hypotheses about the relationship between temperature and particle motion. They will design and conduct experiments to test their hypotheses in a liquid. (These experiments may look at temperature/volume relationships or temperature/diffusion rates) Week 6 ILO 1a,d,e
4a,b,c 5a 6a,b,c
Standard I
Obj I-3a,b,c,d,e Students will receive formative assessment on their lab work, and their lab reports. Standards assessment will be continual and informal through observations during group work and class discussions. Standards will also be assessed through bellwork writing assignments at the beginning of each class period. Students will measure the mass and volume of several liquids and solids.
Students will reflect on the independent nature of volume and mass. Some things that have considerable volume have little mass, and other materials with relatively small volumes have greater mass. Students will measure the mass and volume of several different liquid and solid materials that have equal volume.
Students will measure the mass and volume of different materials of different masses and volumes and record the data as a ratio of mass to volume. Students will arrange items in order from smallest ratio to largest ratio and categorize them according to ratio smaller than one and greater than one.
Students will make predictions of relative ratios of mass to volume by observing patterns and utilizing mathematical reasoning. Week 7 ILO 1a,d 4a
Standard I,V
Obj I-2a,b V-2a,e Students will receive formative assessment on their lab and ratio work. Standards assessment will be continual and informal through observations during group work and class discussions. Standards will also be assessed through bellwork writing assignments at the beginning of each class period. Students will work with earth materials and learn how density, gravity and particle size sort materials in streambeds, road cuts, beaches, and the layers of the earth and its atmosphere.
They will practice calculating densities, comparing those of different earth materials.
Students will use classification systems based on particle size and density to organize materials.
Students will create models to observe the sorting of materials in mixtures.
They will also create models of the layers of the Earth and its atmosphere.
They will identify accurate aspects and inaccuracies of all models created and used in the class.
Students will use a field guide to identify and classify many types of rocks.
This unit will culminate with an examination of Utah Standard II material and density. Weeks 11-15 ILO 1a,d,e,g
4a,b,c 5a 6a,b,c
Standard I, II, V
Obj I-2a,b,c,d
II-1a-e, II-2a-d
V-2a,e Students will receive formative assessment on their models. Standards assessment will be continual and informal through observations during group work and class discussions. Standards will also be assessed through bellwork writing assignments at the beginning of each class period and through their Utah Standard II examination Students will design a procedure to measure the mass and volume of a gas, research its feasibility, modify their procedure if necessary based on their research, perform the procedure in the laboratory, and write a lab report, citing the research they used to inform their procedure.

Students will review all Utah Standard I material and write an exam. Week 8 ILO 1e, 3a,b,d
4a,b,c,d
Standard I
Obj I-1a-e,
I-2a-e, I-3a-e Students will receive formative assessment on their lab work, and their lab reports. Standards assessment will be continual and informal through observations during group work and class discussions. Standards will also be assessed through bellwork writing assignments at the beginning of each class period, and through their Utah Standard I exam. Students will learn that the ratio of mass to volume of water is 1g/ml during their measurements.
Students will learn that the ratio of mass to volume of a material is called density.
Students will predict whether various items will sink or float, test their predictions, and sort them on that basis. Then they will estimate the relative densities of the items using mathematical reasoning.
Students will calculate the density of various earth materials(iron, lead, nickel, basalt, granite,water etc.) and use the densities to identify them.
Students will learn that gravity pulls items of greater density closer to its center. Week 7 continued ILO 1a,b,d,g, 4e
3a,d
Standard I,II
Obj I-2c II-1b Students will receive formative assessment on their density calculations. Standards assessment will be continual and informal through observations during group work and class discussions. Standards will also be assessed through bellwork writing assignments at the beginning of each class period. Week 2 Weeks 9-10 Based on the answers provided to the questions on Day 1 or other interests of the student, each student will choose an inquiry project. This project will involve researching, distinguishing between factual statements and inferences, analyzing information and constructing conclusions, summarizing and constructing information in a visual format. The project must include information about molecular and atomic structure and density. Students must identify the men and women who have made contributions in their area of study and tell about those contributions. The project may be purely academic research, or it may involve experimentation. Students will be assessed on the accuracy of their information (ability to distinguish between fact, inference, and falacy), thoroughness of their analysis and summary, and completeness of their product. Students will be rewarded for creative effort. ILO 1-e,f 2-a,b,d, 3a,
4a,b,c,d 5a,d Standard I Students will learn that some atoms combine to form organic compounds that are the raw material of which cells are made. Cells are the material that composes all living things. Cells differentiate and combine to form tissues, organs, systems, and organisms.
Students will learn the structures of the cell (cell wall, cell membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm, chloroplasts, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, ribosomes, golgi body, and vacuoles) and the functions for which each structure is adapted (photosynthesis, reproduction, and respiration).
Using Concept Attainment Strategy, students will learn to differentiate between plant and animal cells based on structure.
Students will learn proper use and care of the microscope and do laboratory work on cheek cells,onion cells and diatoms.
Students will create models of plant and animal cells. Week 18 ILO 1a,b,c,d
3a,b,c 4a,f
5b
Std I, III, V
Obj I-1b,
III-1a,b,c
V-2a,b Students will receive formative assessment of their lab work. Standards assessment will be continual and informal through observations during group work and class discussions. Standards will also be assessed through bellwork writing assignments at the beginning of each class period and accuracy of their models. Students will also be assessed on content and skill through exercises requiring them to sort cells viewed through the microscope as plant or animal cells. Weeks 16-17 Based on the answers provided to the questions on Day 1 or other interests of the student, each student will choose an inquiry project. This project will involve researching, distinguishing between factual statements and inferences, designing an observational study, making observations in nature, keeping a journal of their observations, analyzing, summarizing, and drawing inferences from the data they collect, and making an oral presentation. The project must have something to do with geology, the earth, its atmosphere, weather, water, or somehow relate to Standard II. Students must identify the men and women who have made contributions in their area of study and tell about those contributions. The project may be purely academic research, or it may involve experimentation. For those who do not have off-campus opportunities, the project is possible to complete with full credit without leaving the school. Students will be assessed on the thoroughness of their observations and journal, the accuracy of their research, and their presentation. Students will be rewarded for effort in field work. ILO 1-e,f 2-a,b,d,
3a, 4a,b,c,d 5a,d
6c,f Standard II This Prezi was created in 2012 by curriculum designer, Ryan Everhart. It's structure is based on the National Research Council's Board on Science Education publication, A Framework for
K-12 Science Education. The intended learning outcomes, standards and objectives are those of the Utah 7th grade integrated science core curriculum. Philosophically, it is based on the concept that cultivation of the intellect is the highest priority of education. The author believes this is best achieved by focusing on students' interests and empowering learners to integrate their own thinking and experience with current scientific knowledge in an environment that strongly promotes literacy. You are welcome to use and adapt this Prezi. Ryan Everhart
PO Box 135
Morgan, UT
84050
doceverhart@gmail.com 7th Grade
Integrated Science Each curriculum block is physically positioned on the map in such a way that it is contained by the circles of all standards to which it applies. Students in heterogenous groups will research one of the historical cell theories. (Hooke, Leeuenhoek, Schleiden, Schwann, and Virchow)
Students will then form homologous groups to create a poster/timeline detailing the models they studied, how the theories contributed to our current knowledge of cell structure and the limitations of those models. Students will reflect on the cumulative nature of the theories, how they were revised as new evidence was discovered and the role that technology played in providing evidence.
Students will individually choose between writing a paper, creating/performing an act, producing/filming/ showing a video, giving a presentation, or writing and perfoming a poem or song about their model. Week 19 ILO 4b,c,d
5a,b,c,d
Standard III
Obj. III-1e Students will be assessed on their understanding of cell theory, the limitations of the theories, the cumulative nature of science, the role of technology in science, and how science is revised in light of new evidence.Students will be assessed on their written or oral reports and use of scientific language. Students will learn the processes of diffusion and osmosis and relate this to the motion of particles by setting up an egg lab in which they observe changes to eggs placed in salt water, water with red food coloring, distilled water, isopropyl alcohol, and corn syrup. Eggs have previously had their shells disolved in vinegar.
Students will daily record any observed changes.
At the end of two weeks, students will write a reflection on the experiment. They will then have a small group discussion about the reasons for what happened, followed by a whole class discussion about diffusion, osmosis, the motion of particles into and out of the cell, and the perpetuation of natural laws that allow us to form scientific conclusions. The discussion will also address how the structure and functions of various cellular structures allow cells, and organisms to adapt to different environments. After the discussions, students will write working definitions of diffusion and osmosis on exit cards. Weeks 19-20 (ongoing) ILO 1a,b,e, 4a,b,c,
6b,c,e,f
Standards I,II,III,IV
Obj. I-3a,c,
II-1, III-1d, IV-2 Students will be assessed on their understanding of cell processes as observed in their observation journals, their reflection papers, their discussions, and their exit cards. Students will learn about the tissues, organs, and organ systems which cells compose, their functions, and how they work together in the organism using microscopes and models.
Students will classify these by structure from simple to complex
Students will be able to match examples of tissues, organs, organ systems, and organisms to the appropriate level.
Given an organ, students will be able to identify its component parts and the larger system of which it is a part.
Students will identify the general functions of the major systems of the human body (digestion, respiration, reproduction, circulation, excretion, protection from disease, movement, control, and coordination and describe the ways in which these systems interact.
Students will create graphic organizers in which they trace the movement of oxygen through an organism. Weeks 20-21 ILO I-b,c,d IIIa-d,
IV a-c,f, Va
Standard I, III
Obj. I-2, III-2a-d Students will be assessed on their understanding of living structures and processes as observed in classwork, bellwork writing assignments, graphic organizers, and skits. Weeks 23-24 Based on the answers provided to the questions on Day 1 or
other interests of the student, each student will choose an
inquiry project. This project will involve scientific literacy. Students will choose to read a book about a subject of interest in the field of biology. Classtime will be used
to research the biological topics addressed in the book.
Students will keep a journal of their classroom
discoveries related to the inquiry. These may be solely
academic research or may involve experimentation.
After reading the book, students will write a reflection
in which they relate what they learned in the book to
their existing knowledge base from class and life. Students will be assessed on the accuracy of their information (ability to distinguish between fact, inference, and falacy) and their written reflection. Students will be rewarded for linking information learned from the book and class to their own life experiences. ILO IIa-d, IVa-c
Standard III Weeks 30-31 Based on the answers provided to the questions on Day 1 or other interests of the student, each student will choose an inquiry project. For this project, each student will identify an ecological problem, research it and propose a solution to the problem using their knowledge of the atomic structure of matter, the composition of the earth, the cell and living structures, and/or phenotypic expression and adaptation.

Students will create a poster describing the problem, their research, and their proposal, identifying areas where the solution requires further research or technological advances before implementation. Students will be assessed on the accuracy of their information (ability to distinguish between fact, inference, and falacy), thoroughness of their analysis and summary, and completeness of their poster. Students will be rewarded for creative effort. ILO 1-b,c,f, 2-a-e
3a,d, 4a-d,f, 5a, 6f
Standard I,II,III,IV Cumulative review using a games approach.
Cumulative final exam. Final Week(s) of the School Year ILO 3a-d
Standards I-V Students will be assessed on their understanding of material in Standards I-V on a written cumulative exam. Students will perform skits in which they follow a food through the various organs, systems, tissues, and cells as it is broken down. Non-digestible and excess will be excreted as waste, important substances will be broken down into organic molecules and taken up into cells in various organs.
Following are some of the structures and concepts they will need to know: Digestion System: energy rich molecules, carbohydrate, glucose, mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, salivary glands, pancreas, gall bladder, liver, mechanical digestion, chemical digestion, peristalsis, villi, chyme, acid, enzymes, mucus, digestion; Circulatory System: artery, vein, capillary, capillary bed, heart, pulse, blood, red blood cell, closed system: Respiratory System: diaphragm, inhaling, exhaling, esophagus, epiglottis, trachea, lungs, bronchi, bronchioles, alveoli Students will compare sexual and asexual reproduction including multi-cellular and single cellular organisms.
Students will be able to classify organisms based on their reproductive strategies.
Students will model how genetic information is passed on to offspring from each parent.
Students will classify traits as either inherited or acquired.
Students will determine the probability of an offspring inheriting a trait from its parents and compare inherited traits between offspring and parents.
Students will do an eye color lab with Drosophila, they will be given the basic procedure, but will be required to ask their own questions, define variables, detail the procedure, collect and analyze data, report, and discuss the results. Week 25 ILO 1a,b,c,e
3a,b,c 4a-c
5a, 6c,d
Std IV, V
Obj. IV-1a-d Students will receive formative assessment of their lab work. Standards assessment will be continual and informal through observations during group work and class discussions. Standards will also be assessed through bellwork writing assignments at the beginning of each class period and accuracy of their models. Students will choose traits of organisms in which they are interested and research the relationship between inherited traits and the environment. They will develop understanding of how certain common traits are more likely to offer an advantage for survival to an organism.
Students will cite examples of traits that provide an advantage for survival in one environment but not other environments (peppered moths, bird beak size, metabolism of Pima people, etc.)
Students will relate the structure of organs to an organism's ability to survive in a specific environment.
Students will give an oral presentation of their research to the class using Power Point or similar presentation software. Week 26 ILO 2a,b,c, 3a,b,c 4b, 5a Std I, III, IV
Obj III-1,2, IV-2a,b,d Students will receive formative assessment on their research. Standards will be assessed through bellwork writing assignments at the beginning of each class period. Students will be assessed on their oral presentations including the accuracy of the information they present, and their use of scientific language. Students will learn about changes in expressed genetic traits due to natural and manmade influences.
Students will compare and contrast natural selection with artificial selection.
Students will develop a basic understanding of limiting resources, niche segregation, reproductive isolation and speciation events through playing several interactive games and model simulations.
Students will learn that phylogenetic classifications are based on observations of genetic traits and on genetic analysis.
Students will write a reflection on natural selection and the natural processes that form the basis for our scientific conclusions. Week27 ILO 1a,b
3a,b,c 4f, 6e
Std IV, V
Obj IV-2c Standards assessment will be continual and informal through observations during group work and class discussions. Standards will also be assessed through bellwork writing assignments at the beginning of each class period and accuracy of their models. Students will also be assessed on their written reflections. -Students will learn that phylogenetic
classifications are based on observations of
genetic traits and on genetic analysis.
-Students will sort organisms according to kingdom (plant,
animal, monera, fungi, protist) This will be done on a field trip
to a zoo or aquarium.
-Students will identify organisms that are not classified as either plant or animal
-Students will learn examples of organisms that once were classified based on
visual observations in one category, but have now been reclassified based on molecular analysis
of DNA.
-Students will reflect on the nature of science and how technological advances have influenced science and how science conclusions are tentative and subject to revision in light of new evidence.
-Students will identify ants and bones from owl pellets according to dichotomous keys.
-Students will review and write a Standard IV/V examination. Week 28-29 Students will be assessed on their classifications and bellwork writing assignments at the beginning of each class period. Students will be formally assessed on the Standard IV/V examination. Students will identify the components, function, and processes of plant and animal (human)reproductive systems.
Students will recognize that every organism needs a set of instructions to determine its traits. and that this hereditary information as contained in genes on the chromosomes of each cell.
Students will create a series of events chain graphic organizer to demonstrate basic understanding of the reproductive process at the cellular level.
Students will review for and write the Standard III exam. Week 22 ILO 1a,b,c,d
3a,b,c 4a,f
5b
Std III, IV Students will be assessed on their understanding of living structures and processes as observed in classwork, bellwork writing assignments, graphic organizers, and the Standard III examination. Students will be assessed on their understanding of living structures and processes as observed in classwork, bellwork writing assignments, graphic organizers, and skits. ILO 1a, 3a-d,
5b, 6d
Std IV, V
Obj V-3a-d
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