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Can the built environment be a contributing factor to the natural environment and local ecosystems?

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Kieran McSherry

on 11 August 2013

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Transcript of Can the built environment be a contributing factor to the natural environment and local ecosystems?

Introduction
The Spark
?
Why is it a Question?
The Question
How to answer the Q?
The structure of the essay:
I recently read a book called Cradle to cradle by William McDonough and Michael Braungart, the book proposes that our current design solutions are a continuation of the industrial revolution, solutions that we as a race are discovering to be destroying the planet and its ecosystems. The book re-thinks design and offers a new way to design, ‘cradle to cradle’ looks to turn waste into food, inspired by nature where waste equals nutrition, the manifesto describes two flows of energy, the ecosphere and the techno-sphere, where all materials are infinitely re-used. This way of design looks to create the built environment as a contributor to the natural environment, so that humans may become creators of life not consumers of it.
The economics of ecosystems and biodiversity
By analysing the Vastra-Hamnen development in Malmö and understanding the lessons leanrt, i will then propose the possbile benfits to a sample of current Edinburgh based developments.
Chapter one
Chapter two
Conclusion
summarize the chapters
Point to an answer
Summary
My opinion
The possbile out comes if edinburgh were to impliment the lessons learnt from Malmo
Express my oponion
Case study one - Vastra-Hamnen, Malmö
Sample 1 - Edinburgh development

Western Habour, Leith
Dvelopement Proposal
The guidlines
Out come
Lessons learnt
Being less bad
is not being good.
A regulation is a signal
of design faliure
Research
Bibliography
Green Cities: An A-to-Z Guide (The SAGE Reference Series on Green Society: Toward a Sustainable Future-Series Editor: Paul Robbins) p 313
THE ECONOMICS OF ECOSYSTEMS AND BIODIVERSITY

Human well-being is dependent upon "ecosystem services" provided by nature for free, such as water and air purification, fisheries, timber and nutrient cycling. These are predominantly public goods with no markets and no prices, so their loss often is not detected by our current economic incentive system and can thus continue unabated. A variety of pressures resulting from population growth, changing diets, urbanisation, climate change and many other factors is causing biodiversity to decline, and ecosystems are continuously being degraded. The world’s poor are most at risk from the continuing loss of biodiversity, as they are the ones that are most reliant on the ecosystem services that are being degraded.

At the meeting of the environment ministers of the G8 countries and the five major newly industrialising countries that took place in Potsdam in March 2007, the German government proposed a study on 'The economic significance of the global loss of biological diversity' as part of the so-called 'Potsdam Initiative' for biodiversity.

The following wording was agreed at Potsdam: 'In a global study we will initiate the process of analysing the global economic benefit of biological diversity, the costs of the loss of biodiversity and the failure to take protective measures versus the costs of effective conservation.'
Ford Rouge Center Landscape Master Plan, Michigan
Area - 259.0 km2 (100.00 sq mi)
Population (2010) - 486,120
Urban density - 1,844/km2 (4,776/sq mi)
Area - 335.14 km2 (129.40 sq mi)
Population (2010) - 300,515
Urban density - 3,651/km2 (9,460/sq mi)
Västra Hamnen
.Population: 2,000
.Site area: 25 ha
.Density :8,000inhabitants /sq.km
.(Malmö.wide1739inhabitants/sq.km)
.Green area:7ha
.Green Coverage Ratio: 28%(35sq.m/person)
(Malmö.wide 33sq.m/person)
.The most density area of Malmö
(Malmö Statistic 2006
green space factor
wild life provision
maintance and mangement
biodiversity
responce to local ecosystems
well being of occupants
benefits of habitat based design
responce to local ecosystems
class divide
Introduction
The Spark
Can the built enviroment be a contributing factor to natural enviroments and eco systems?
Why is it a Question?
The Question
How to answer the Q?
The structure of the essay:
I recently read a book called Cradle to cradle by William McDonough and Michael Braungart, the book proposes that our current design solutions are a continuation of the industrial revolution, solutions that we as a race are discovering to be destroying the planet and its ecosystems. The book re-thinks design and offers a new way to design, ‘cradle to cradle’ looks to turn waste into food, inspired by nature where waste equals nutrition, the manifesto describes two flows of energy, the ecosphere and the techno-sphere, where all materials are infinitely re-used. This way of design looks to create the built environment as a contributor to the natural environment, so that humans may become creators of life not consumers of it.
The economics of ecosystems and biodiversity
By analysing two built environments, and comparing their capacities to contribute and create ecosystems and biodiversity.
Chapter one
Chapter two
Chapter three
Conclusion
summarize the chapters
Point to an answer
Summary
My opinion
illustrate how the chapters point to an answer
Express my oponion
Case study one - Vastra-Hamnen, Malmö
Case study two - Western Harbour, Leith
Compare and contrast
Quantitative
research
Qualitative
research
Quantitative
research
Qualitative
research
Successes
Short falls
THE ECONOMICS OF ECOSYSTEMS AND BIODIVERSITY

Human well-being is dependent upon "ecosystem services" provided by nature for free, such as water and air purification, fisheries, timber and nutrient cycling. These are predominantly public goods with no markets and no prices, so their loss often is not detected by our current economic incentive system and can thus continue unabated. A variety of pressures resulting from population growth, changing diets, urbanisation, climate change and many other factors is causing biodiversity to decline, and ecosystems are continuously being degraded. The world’s poor are most at risk from the continuing loss of biodiversity, as they are the ones that are most reliant on the ecosystem services that are being degraded.

At the meeting of the environment ministers of the G8 countries and the five major newly industrialising countries that took place in Potsdam in March 2007, the German government proposed a study on 'The economic significance of the global loss of biological diversity' as part of the so-called 'Potsdam Initiative' for biodiversity.

The following wording was agreed at Potsdam: 'In a global study we will initiate the process of analysing the global economic benefit of biological diversity, the costs of the loss of biodiversity and the failure to take protective measures versus the costs of effective conservation.'
Ford Rouge Center Landscape Master Plan, Michigan
Area - 259.0 km2 (100.00 sq mi)
Population (2010) - 486,120
Urban density - 1,844/km2 (4,776/sq mi)
Area - 335.14 km2 (129.40 sq mi)
Population (2010) - 300,515
Urban density - 3,651/km2 (9,460/sq mi)
Västra Hamnen
.Population: 2,000
.Site area: 25 ha
.Density :8,000inhabitants /sq.km
.(Malmö.wide1739inhabitants/sq.km)
.Green area:7ha
.Green Coverage Ratio: 28%(35sq.m/person)
(Malmö.wide 33sq.m/person)
.The most density area of Malmö
(Malmö Statistic 2006
&
green space factor
wild life provision
maintance and mangement
biodiversity
responce to local ecosystems
well being of occupants
benefits of habitat based design
responce to local ecosystems
green space factor
wild life provision
maintance and mangement
biodiversity
responce to local ecosystems
well being of occupants
benefits of habitat based design
responce to local ecosystems
Quantitative
research
35 points
etc
&
&
the proposal
how could Malmo influence
Full transcript