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Georgia

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grace kelley

on 27 March 2013

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Transcript of Georgia

It is warm all the time summer, spring, fall you name it. The winters are mild.

The warm climate makes it possible to grow crops almost all year round, and is ideally suited for plantation. Reason one The economy grows its own food so Georgia is self reliant and never gets let down by not getting a good trade. The things they grow are tobacco, cotton, corn, vegetables, grain, fruit, peanuts and livestock. Crops also were traded for items that could not be produced on plantations like shoes, lace, farm tools, and dishes. Reason 2
Economy Almost all religions were welcome including Baptist, Anglicans, and Christians . Catholics were not welcome in the Georgia. Catholics were not welcome because it was not popular in England. He was also worried about Catholics in Georgia because the Spanish lived right next to them in Florida and Catholicism could influence them. By: Sophie, Eva, and Grace Why you should come to
Georgia Reason 3 Reason 4 When Georgia was settled, James Oglethorpe decided that he didn't want slaves or alcohol. After James Oglethorpe left his post 12 years later the colonists of Georgia lifted the ban of alcohol immediately. 3 years later in 1749, the colonists allowed slavery. The flag There are three stripes on the flag, two red and one white. Circling the statue on the blue field are thirteen stars, representing it as one of the thirteen colonies. The flag's name is the Georgian stars and bars. Founded in 1732, by James
Edward Oglethorpe. Fun facts Georgia was founded for all
the prisoners in jail who were
accused or prosecuted. They decided to come to Georgia to start a new life.
Georgia was also founded
to protect the middle colonies
from Spanish attacks in Florida. Location Georgia is located in the southern
colonies. It is the closest to Florida.
Georgia is also by the East coast. The location is actually one of the reasons
why people settled there. Landscape The landscape is a little hilly, but overall flat. Georgia has many great forests. There are only a few mountains on the border of Georgia. The founder As a visionary, social reinforcer, and military leader, James Oglethorpe conceived of and implemented a plan to establish Georgia.
Oglethorpe was born on December, 22, 1696, in London, England. Oglethorpe lived a wealthy childhood because his dad (Theophilus) owned lots of land.
In 1714, he was admitted to Corpus Christi college at Oxford University. The excitement of Europe's defense against the advancing Turks led him to drop out of school and enroll in a military academy in France. Oglethorpe never graduated.
In 1729, his friend went to jail because he was in debt. His friend's death due to disease led him to investigate the jails. He found out that the jails were abusing and not feeding the prisoners well so that's why he decided to start a colony. The prisoners could then start a new life on the plantations. More Fun Facts The colonists hoped to make silk Georgia's chief product because of the colonies plentiful mulberry trees and silk worms. It didn't work so instead they grew rice, indigo, lumber and fur became Georgia's main chief product.

Georgia was named after King George the ii.
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