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Speech Delivery

Presentation on Speech Delivery
by

Emerald Perez

on 26 October 2015

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Transcript of Speech Delivery

DELIVERY
BY
EMERALD PEREZ
DELIVERY
Speech delivery is a matter of nonverbal communication. It is based on how you use your voice and body to convey the message expressed by your words.

Good delivery combines a certain degree formality with the best attributes of good conversation- directness, spontaneity, animation, vocal and facial expressiveness, and a lively sense of communication. Speech delivery is an art, not a science. What works for one speaker may fail for another speaker

METHODS OF DELIVERY
There are four basic methods of delivering a speech:


1. Reading verbatim from a manuscript
2. Reciting a memorized text
3. Speaking impromptu
4. Speaking extemporaneously

1. READING FROM A MANUSCRIPT
Manuscript speech is a speech that is written out word for word and read to the audience.

There are certain speeches that must be read word for word.

An example can be the President giving a message to Congress and a misstated phrase could cause an international incident.

It does take skill to deliver a speech verbatim. You don’t want to sound artificial.

You don’t want to come off as reading to the audience; rather you need to be taking to them

2. RECITING FROM MEMORY
More often now, we don’t have to memorize the whole speech like in earlier times. For the most part speeches that are short like toasts or an acceptance speech are the ones that you may want to memorize. If you are going to be giving a speech from memory be sure to memorize it thoroughly so you can concentrate on the communication part of the speech and not trying the whole time to remember the words.
3. SPEAKING IMPROMPTU
Impromptu speech is delivered with little or no immediate preparation.
Not many like to give these types of speeches, these speeches are where you may be called on to “
say a few words
” or in a class discussion to give a rebuttal to what was just discussed .

IF YOU GET CALLED ON
If you do get called on to respond to a previous speaker try to keep in mind four main points

1. State the point you are answering
2. State the point you wish to make
3. Support your point with appropriate statistics, examples, or testimony
4. Summarize or restate your point

4. SPEAKING EXTEMPORANEOUSLY
THE SPEAKER’S VOICE
Everyone looks different and everyone's voice is different as well. Some people have very distinguishing voices and do not have to work very hard on their voice presentation, but for the others needing some help with speaking ; here are a few aspects of your voice you should work on to help you control your voice during your speech.
VOLUME
This is the loudness or softness of the speaker’s voice
You do not want to speak to loudly, or they will think you boorish (rude, crude, or uncouth), and on the other hand if you speak to softly the audience will not understand you.
You can look around the audience for clues as you speak to check if the people in the back can hear you. If they look like they are having trouble hearing or have lost interest, they may not be able to hear you clearly

PITCH
This is the highness and lowness of a speaker’s voice.
As you may have learned in science, that the faster sound waves vibrate-the higher the pitch; and the slower they vibrate, the lower the pitch. You do not want to go too high or too low, but try not to become monotone.

RATE
This refers to the speed at which a person talks.
We usually speak at a rate between 120-150 words per minute

Try to avoid two things when speaking.

1. Talking so slowly that your listeners become bored.
2. The other is to try not to speak so fast that your speech is not understood.


PAUSES
Pauses are the momentary break in the voice delivery of a speech.

1. Learning how to do this properly, will give you more poise and confidence when delivering your speech.
2.Try to avoid filling in those moments with a vocalized pause like “uh”.

VOCAL VARIETY
Vocal variety is in a speaker’s rate, pitch, and volume that give the voice variety and expressiveness.
Just like some say “we all need a little variety in our lives”; if you have vocal variety it will make your speech more interesting and thus make the audience choose to listen to you rather than to have to listen to you

PRONUNCIATION
We all mispronounce words from time to time
Here are a few words that are frequently mispronounced.


Take a moment to read these to yourself


GENUINE ARCTIC
ERR ESPRESSO


Most likely each of us made at least one mistake
WORD COMMON ERROR CORRECT PRONUNCIATION
GENUINE GEN-U-WINE GEN-U-WIN
ARCTIC AR-TIC ARC-TIC
ERR AIR UR
ESPRESSO EX-PRES-O E-SPRES-O

With practice it becomes easier to pronounce words and if unsure, checking in the dictionary is helpful
ARTICULATION
Articulation and pronunciation are not identical.

Articulation is the physical production of particular speech sounds.

With texting being the majority of most communications today, we tend to get used to combining words and articulation comes off sloppy. Some common words are these

WORDS MISARTICULATION

OUGHT TO OTTA
DIDN’T DINT
HAVE TO HAFTA
WANT TO WANNA
GOING TO GONNA

DIALECT
Dialect is a variety of a language distinguished by variations of accent, grammar, or vocabulary.
Dialects are usually based on regional or ethnic speech pattern.
United States has four major regional dialects-Eastern, New England, Southern, and General American, but there a multitude of ethnic dialects.
Ethnic dialect is related to our diverse cultural

THE SPEAKER’S BODY
Most of us can tell what kind of feelings or attitude a person is in by looking at their body language. We may not be experts in kinesics –the study of body motions as a systematic mode of communication; but most of us have known when our mothers were mad at us just by the way she was standing in the doorway when we got home late.
PERSONAL APPEARANCE
Every speaker is expected by her or his audience to exhibit a personal appearance and remembering to keep with the occasion.
Here at community college everyone is very relaxed and causal about their dress, but if you were giving a speech before the members of congress you would have to dress very professional. But if you were doing the introduction for the Marilyn Manson concert this past Saturday. You could get by with in outfit something else.

PROFESSIONAL
ATTIRE
AN OUTFIT FOR CONGRESS
NOT
Sometimes this is a little harder to change; your hand and arm gestures become who you are occasionally.
Keep in mind to not let whatever gestures you use take away from your speech
Try to avoid wringing your hands together, flailing them about, or playing with your ring

GESTURES
EYE CONTACT
EYE CONTACT
This means direct visual contact with the eyes of another person.
This can be easy for some, but when you are nervous it can be hard.
Try to avoid looking in only one area of the room.
If it‘s a small room, try to look briefly from one person to another.
If it’s a larger room, you can scan the audience
You want to convey confidence, sincerity, and conviction. Make them believe in what you are talking about with your eyes

PRACTICING DELIVERY
Practicing makes perfect, but only if you practice properly.
Five-step methods that may work well are as followed:

1. Go through your preparation outline aloud to check how you have written translates into spoken discourse. Is it too long? Is it too short?
2. Prepare your speaking outline.
3.Practice the speech aloud several times using only the speaking outline. Talk through all your examples, stories, or quotes
4.Polish and refine your delivery. Practice in front of a mirror or video camera.
5.Give your speech a dress rehearsal under conditions as close as possible to those you will face in class







Start as early as you can and practice as much as possible if you can.

ANSWERING AUDIENCE QUESTIONS
PREPARING for the question-and-answer can be with two major tips:

1. Work on possible answers to questions that might be asked
2. Practice the delivery of your answers

SUMMARY
Practice is the best thing to do. It can start by practicing your voice, reading your speech, your body language, your body gestures, eye contact, and then to even practice your question and answer sessions
MANAGING the question-and-answer session can be done with these directions:

1. Approach questions with a positive attitude
2. Listen carefully
3. Direct answers to the entire audience
4. Be honest and straightforward
5. Stay on track

Extemporaneous speech is a type of speech that is well prepared and practiced in advance.
The speaker only uses a brief set of notes or a speaking outline to jog the memory.
This type of speech does give you more precise control over thought and language. The more you practice your wording my change each time you practice; but soon you find the perfect wording and become confident in your knowledge of the speech you are giving.
This type of speech encourages “conversational quality”. This means that no matter how many times a speech has been rehearsed, it still sounds spontaneous.

SPEECH DELIVERY
CHAPTER 13
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