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3151 Information Processing Theory

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by

Rhonda King

on 29 August 2011

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Transcript of 3151 Information Processing Theory

Information Processing Theory Humans learn by actively constructing meaning from the world around them.
(Piaget & Vygotsky) When confronted with new or puzzling phenomenon, use of:
previous knowledge
thinking skills
helps make sense of it. How information processsing theory differs:

Places importance on specific thinking processes
PAYING ATTENTION & REMEMBERING

Rejects fixed stages of cognitive development
CHANGES OCCUR GRADUALLY AND SMOOTHLY OVER TIME AS THE MIND BECOMES MORE EFFICIENT Information Processing theory:
(Theory of development)
Emphasizes how children learn in specific situations
Rely on memory, attention, and other learning processes Think of computer as a metaphor for what humans do when they are thinking.

Example:
Young child sees/hears something new like a word to describe an unfamiliar fruit at the dinner table:
retrieves the information
stores it
remembers it
modifies it over time The child's memory can become overloaded if too many mental actions are required at once.
Example: If 3 or 4 new items appear at the table, the child may not be able to learn the names of all of them. attention:
Young preschoolers focus on things randomly; less thought to what is most important
Older preschoolers, (4 & 5)-better able to focus on critical parts of problem solving or for pleasing adults.
Only later in childhood are their attention abilities finely honed. memory:
learning requires children store new information;
Children must actively select what is important to look at or listen to and use specific strategies to store the information. Learning strategies
Rehearsal:repeating over and over to oneself information to be remembered
Organization: arranging like ideas in groups within memory storage and labeling them verbally. Disabilities:
ADD
ADHD
Autism
Intellectual disabilities
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