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Servant Leadership

Presentation to 2013 RA Staff at Loyola University Chicago
by

Oliver Goodrich

on 11 August 2013

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Transcript of Servant Leadership

i. Have you known a leader who fits this model? What was it like to work with this person?
ii. What about this model works?
iii. What are its weaknesses and limits?
iv. Do you recognize any of these qualities – good or bad – in yourself?

Leadership in Action
RA & LCA Retreat 2013
When you hear the word leader, what words or phrases come to mind?
When you leave here today, you will have identified at least one concrete strategy about how you will practice leadership with your residents this year.
Reflection Questions:
What is leadership?
What image or symbol best represents your understanding of “leadership?"
LISTENING
Leadership
Servant
Servant leadership emphasizes increased service to others, a holistic approach to work, promoting a sense of community, and sharing the power in decision making
FORESIGHT
Be Bold. Be Bright. Be a LEADER.
Questions for Reflection:
"Servant Leadership deals with the reality of power in everyday life--its legitimacy, the ethical restraints upon it, and the beneficial results that can be attained through the appropriate use of power." - New York Times
Robert Greenleaf (1904-1990)
+ Founder of the modern-day servant leadership movement
+ Wrote an influential article ("The Servant as Leader") in 1970
+ He identified 10 traits essential to servant leadership
HEALING
AWARENESS
CONCEPTUALIZATION
STEWARDSHIP
COMMITMENT TO THE GROWTH OF PEOPLE
BUILDING COMMUNITY
PERSUASION
EMPATHY
How does our culture define leadership?
adapted from the Hill Consulting Group,
www.hillconsultinggroup.org

Servant-leaders make a deep commitment to listening intently to others.
They seek to identify and clarify the will of a group, listening receptively to what is being said (and not said).
Listening also encompasses getting in touch with one's inner voice, and seeking to understand what one's body, spirit, and mind are communicating.
Servant-leaders strive to understand and empathize with others.
People need to be accepted and recognized for their special and unique spirit.
One must assume the good intentions of coworkers and not reject them as people, even when forced to reject their behavior or performance.
Learning to heal is a powerful force for transformation and integration.
By striving for wholeness and authenticity, the servant-leader has the potential to heal her/himself and others.
"There is something subtle communicated to one who is being served and led if, implicit in the compact between the servant-leader and led is the understanding that the search for wholeness is something that they have." – Robert Greenleaf
Servant leaders are committed to becoming more aware, both of themselves and of the world around them.
Making a commitment to foster awareness can be scary--one never knows that one may discover!
Greenleaf noted that striving for awareness will not necessarily bring solace or peace—in fact, it might stir things up, either in you or in others.
Servant-leaders rely on persuasion, rather than positional authority in making decisions.
Servant-leaders seek to convince others, rather than coerce compliance.
This particular element offers one of the clearest distinctions between the traditional authoritarian model and that of servant-leadership.
The servant-leader is effective at building consensus and cultivating followership within groups.
Servant-leaders seek to imagine a better future and nurture their own ability to "dream great dreams."
Conceptualizing means that one must think beyond the realities and problems of daily life to consider “the big picture.”
Servant-leaders must seek a delicate balance between conceptualization and day-to-day focus.
Foresight is a characteristic that enables servant-leaders to understand lessons from the past, the realities of the present, and the likely consequence of a decision in the future.
Servant-leaders must strive to make connections between past and present experiences with an eye toward the future.
Foresight is deeply rooted in the intuitive mind.
Servant-leaders are motivated in their work by a sense of responsibility to the mission and values of their organization and/or some broader set of purpose and ideals
They also strive to cultivate this sense of purpose and responsibility in the people they lead and serve
Servant-leaders see the people around them not just as they presently are but also as who they might become.
Servant-leaders believe that people have an intrinsic value beyond their tangible contributions as workers.
As such, Servant-leaders are deeply committed to the personal, professional, and spiritual growth of everyone with whom they work.
Servant-leaders recognize that many people feel lonely and isolated in our fast-paced, technocentric and globalized world.
They strive to counteract this trend by connecting people and cultivating values like collaboration, teamwork, and compromise.
Servant-leaders live by the motto “better together.”
So what...
How can I put servant leadership into action on my floor with my residents?

What does it look like for me to practice servant leadership?

Who have I seen model servant leadership?

“Do nothing out of selfishness or out of vanity;
rather, humbly regard others as more important than yourselves,
each looking out not for his own interests, but also for those of others. Have among yourselves the same attitude as Christ Jesus,
Who, though he was in the form of God, did not regard equality
with God something to be grasped. Rather, he emptied himself,
taking the form of a servant, coming in human likeness;
and being found human in appearance, he humbled himself,
becoming obedient to death, even death on a cross.”
– Philippians 2:3-8
“Do nothing out of selfishness or out of vanity;
rather, humbly regard others
as more important than yourselves,
each looking out not for his own interests,
but also for those of others.
Have among yourselves
the same attitude as Christ Jesus,
Who, though he was in the form of God,
did not regard equality with God
something to be grasped.
Rather, he emptied himself,
taking the form of a servant,
coming in human likeness;
and being found human in appearance,
he humbled himself,
becoming obedient to death,
even death on a cross.”
– Philippians 2:3-8
Full transcript