Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Sonnet 18 Poetry Analysis

No description
by

Vivian Shen

on 26 January 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Sonnet 18 Poetry Analysis

Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer's Day
By William Shakespeare
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;

But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
William Shakespeare
-born on or near April 23, 1564
-brought up in Stratford-upon-Avon
-he was often known as the "Bard of Avon"
-he wrote 154 sonnets
-produced most of his known work between 1589 and 1613
-died on April 23, 1616 at the age 52
The point of the poem?
To compare the speaker's beloved to a summer's day
The bigger picture
Unlike a summer's day that fades, the life and
beauty of the speaker's memory of his beloved is eternally preserved in the poem
Poetic Devices
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;

But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.

So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
Assonance of vowel
sound "i"
Repetition of "more"
"fair" "Nor" "So long"
Rhetorical Question
Personification of death
Personification of "This" meaning the poem can live
Personification of heaven
"the eye" also a metaphor
for the sun
Alliteration of "f" sound
Imagery
Emphasizes on how
nothing is able to destroy
the loveliness/life of "thee"
Emphasizes on the
longevity of the poem
Why do I like it?
It has an elegant and romantic feel

The last two lines are really meaningful and true

It is one of the easier sonnets to understand written by Shakespear
Why do I dislike it?
The fact that there are no obvious
metaphors or similes even though
the poem itself is about a comparison
Full transcript