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BSA District Committee Training Workshop

on online orientation to committees in BSA District Operations
by

Darryl Alder

on 26 March 2013

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Transcript of BSA District Committee Training Workshop

Membership An on-line orientation to the
four functions of District Operations District Committee Training Workshop UNIT SERVICE PROGRAM FINANCE MEMBERSHIP Define four functions of district operation
List positions and structures of the district
List four tasks accomplished under each function
Identify camping and outdoor committee tasks
Review responsibilities the district chairman, district commissioner, or the district executive.
Tell why this committee is essential to operations
Name other positions or committees you might need to talk with to carry out assignments in the district.
Understand camping’s supremacy among BSA methods
Identify key resources
Define district operation functions.
Identify each subcommittee’s tasks.
Correctly assign Key 3 tasks.
Explain the nature of your assignment.
Identify three subcommittees that help you complete your assignments.
Understand Quality District and Self Evaluation tools Workshop Objectives Councils guide and support districts in
Membership
Finance
Program
unit service
In doing so, the districts and council achieve the purpose and mission of the BSA:

“The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their life times by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.” Mission and Aims Districts are responsible for four functions:
Membership Function
Finance Function
Program Function
Unit Service Function

The structure for carrying out these functions
may vary, but the functions remain the same. District Responsibilities The membership, finance and program functions are carried out by members of the district committee the people in this room along with Chartered Organization Representatives
The unit service function is carried out by the commissioner staff meets separately from the district committee Four Functions The membership function strives for growth through
Organization of new Scouting units
New members joining existing units Membership Function
The finance function insures the district provides its share of funds to the total council operating budget. Finance Function Program function has four to six sub committees
Training
Camping Promotion
Activities and Civic Service
Advancement
(Learning for Life)
(Health and Safety) Program Function Commissioners have a special impact on a district's success because of direct-line relationship to units.
They are the only commis-sioned volunteers at the District level.
Unit service and health are so important that having a dynamic district commissioner staff should be major district priority.
Including Roundtables, it represents nearly half the of the district’s operation Unit Service Function Learning for Life Health and Safety Publicity Advancement Activities and Civic Service Outdoor Promotion Training District Executive Program Committee Finance Committee Membership Committee District Chair District Commissioner DISTRICT Standard District Structure Overall district leadership is provided by
the Key 3
District Chair
District Commissioner
District Executive
Many districts have also have
one ormore district vice-chairman Key 3 Bequests and endowments
come from district people
District people see Scouting in action and decide to give.
District finance
volunteers assist by
encouraging such gifts
coordinating with the council. Bequests and Endowments Scout
EXPO Gingerbread House Festival
Gingerbread House Festival
Scout Expo has a double purpose
unit program enrichment
source of funds through ticket sales.
District finance volunteers
promote ticket sales
manage ticket sales Special Activities and Events District enrollment.
Community enrollment.
Family enrollment. Friends of Scouting Friends of Scouting
Special projects
Special activities and events
Bequests and other deferred giving
Currently the United Way does not give direct support to programs in our area. How People Give to Scouting People give to
People
Causes
It makes a difference who asks and how Who Gives and Why? FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
DEADLINE--DEADLINE--DEADLINE!! From the very beginning, every leader in a division must be responsible for every person recruited, committing him to attend the orientation, kickoff, and report meetings.
Study carefully all deadlines for recruiting the various groups of sales representatives.
The recruiting schedule must be met. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP Friends of Scouting - Steps for Getting Enough of the Right People to Solicit Cards
Step 1 – The division chairman, with the help of the district executive, needs a list of prospective majors. Call on the most capable people. In selecting prospective majors, look to getting full coverage of area served. Look at team captains who did a good job last year.
Step 2 – The division chairman, with the help of the district executive, compiles a list of prospective captains. Begin with leftover majors. Every division holds a meeting of its majors to orient and train them; then, they should choose the prospective captains to be on their team. Prospective captains list should come from last year's good sales representatives. Note: a major must be trained before they start recruiting their captains. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE The degree of any campaign’s success depends upon:
Top leadership
Prospecting and evaluation—determining who has ability an interest to give
The right person making personal solicitation
Campaign controls/ executive direction FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE Positive leadership is an irreplaceable qualification for each member.
The council enrollment chairman should be selected before the committee’s first meeting.
If the chairman has not been recruited, a major function of the committee is selecting the chairman.
If the proper committee has been selected, the best candidate for chairman is likely to be a member of the committee. Some councils successfully complete campaigns on time by merely scheduling a victory celebration.
This simple act creates great expectations of success.
Councils that campaigned all year (or seldom achieved their goal) found scheduling a victory celebration gave everyone the motivation and enthusiasm needed to make the campaign a success. Victory Celebration Many families would participate in FOS if approached properly. As it turns out, only 25% of potential contributors are even asked to participate.
Make sure all parents are approached with an effective I-C-5 (“I See Five”) contact on unit presentation.
Family enrollment efforts are vital to Scouting’s future Improved Family Enrollment Campaigns are organized around the available leader- ship and their influence – not by a rigid structure.
Many councils have had dramatic results using steering committees that are responsible for the campaign success.
These committees meet to:
Determine campaign status
Decide what needs to be done
Recruit required manpower
Make assignments for action prior to the next meeting Trends in Successful
Fund-Raising • Active steering committee
• Increased upper-level giving
• Involvement of top community leadership
• Trying to increase the potential giving (not just business as usual)
On-time goal achievement and victory celebrations
Shorter campaign time Trends in Successful
Fund-Raising Scouting Dollars Scouting Dollars National Council The national office adds new programs to meet the needs of youth in a changing era.
A national staff employees skilled administrators and specialists in the total program of Scouting.
Four regional offices provide direct service to 300+ councils.
National costs are paid from membership fees, local council service fees, Supply Group and Magazine Division profits, investments, and special grants from foundations, individuals, and corporations Financial Resources Local Council Staff and services for member-ship growth and quality program.
Outdoor programs and training facilities
Financing comes from support
Friends of Scouting
Sales
Activity Fees
Investment Income
Special funds from
Foundations
Grants
product sales
project sales Financial Resources Youth members Encouraged to pay personal expenses.
Uniform
personal equipment
registration fee
unit dues
camp fees
covers other personal expenses.
Thrift and personal responsibility have always been objectives of the BSA. Financial Resources The youth member
The community
The nation

All provide resources that make Scouting possible. Financial Resources Founder member $50,000
Pacesetter member $25,000
Distinguished member $10,000
Benefactor member $ 5,000
Sponsor member $ 2,500
Guardian member $ 1,000
Honor member $ 750
Patron member $ 500
Leadership member $ 250
Century member $ 150 ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —MEMBERSHIP LEVELS Build enrollment organization with membership divisions levels.
Council memberships are normally limited to Patron and above.
District memberships usually duplicate council levels, but tend to concentrate on Century to Guardian memberships.
Community membership levels vary. In areas where district enrollment is difficult to organize, memberships frequently include Century members and above ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —MEMBERSHIP LEVELS ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —TIMING To maximize chances of success, involve volunteers at the council, district, and unit levels.
A complete organization is developed for each enrollment with calendar, volunteer leadership, and executive direction. ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —TIMING Follow the fundamental principles of successful fund-raising and for a winning campaign
People give money to people, especially when they’re asked by those with similar or equal standings.
“Peer pressure” usually leads to substantial gifts ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —TIMING The FOS program typically follows a routine timetable.
Campaign momentum and success depends on making the major portion of the goal quickly.
Success in the first part of the council enrollment (the executive board and staff pledges) is a good indicator of how rapidly the council will achieve its goal.
Raising a major portion of the goal early generates great momentum and boosts morale.
The general times for the four phases are:
Council enrollment December-January
District enrollment January
Community enrollment February
Family enrollment Sept/October – Troops
February/March -- Packs ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? To be successful, the annual enrollment must have three elements:
Determining prospective donors’ interest in Scouting
Analyzing prospect’s financial ability to contribute
Determining who is the right person to make the solicitation ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? FOS reflects and defines
Council programs
Constituency perception
The annual enrollment program interprets the achievement of the aims and objectives of Scouting to our constituency—thus the “Promise of Scouting” Campaign for 2007 ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? 84 % of philanthropic gifts come from individuals
75 % from living donors
9 % through bequests
Scouting builds constituency by influencing people who willingly support us on a continuing basis.
Scouting directly influences families of youth, but can be expanded by cultivating those exposed in different ways. Including:
Relatives – Volunteers
Community leaders – Scouting alumni
Members of chartered organizations ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? Authority for the enrollment is found in the Rules and Regulations of the Boy Scouts of America, Article XI, Section 3, Clause 13:

“Sustaining. Persons who desire to be identified with the local council through their financial support and influence in the expansion of the council program may be enrolled as sustaining members of local councils...” ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? Councils use the program to build constituency
Friends of Scouting is the largest source of income
A well-developed FOS program offers benefits beyond the income, including:
An awareness and understanding for council programs
A broad base for support of program resources
New prospects as well as current donors
A measure of independence in program and operation
An annual opportunity to tell the council’s story
An opportunity for a donor to gain personal satisfaction THE FRIENDS OF SCOUTING
RESOURCE MANUAL—PART 1 The Friends of Scouting plan is based on proven fund-raising principles.
The plan has evolved from the successful experiences of local councils.
When councils explain dramatic increases in giving, they report, “We just followed the plan.”
The following slides
describe the basic plan
emphasizes developing trends and techniques Apply what you’ve learned!
Travel safely!
Good Scouting! Thanks For Being A Part of This Training Experience Thank you for your help in obtaining the tangible dollar resources that make council and district services available to expand Scouting for your community's youth. Most of America's youth will never know that you are behind their Scouting growth, but you and the leaders of the council will know.

As the chair of the district finance committee, a committee member, or a part of the district's Friends of Scouting campaign, you will help to make Scouting a dynamic success in your community. DISTRICT ENROLLMENT CALENDAR July-August.
Recruit the following:
Benefactor chairman $5,000
Sponsor chairman $2,500
Guardian chairman $1,000
Patron chairman $500
Leadership chairman $250
Century chairman $150
Prepare prospects lists in the order listed (chairman, district executive, and others assist) DISTRICT ENROLLMENT CALENDAR April-May
District/divisions enrollment chairman recruited.
Chair to info meeting
May-June
Prospect selection and evaluation. ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL CAMPAIGN with the orientation of your steering committee.
Give close attention to the upgrading of giving levels.
Solicit gifts at every meeting. Everyone should be a donor prior to asking others to give.
Keep on schedule.
Don't assume anything. Research and cultivation of prospects occurs all year
90% of successful fundraising is research
Involvement of top community leadership
Place major emphasis on selecting the best available leadership at all levels. Start CLEAN-UP As the campaign nears completion, a concerted effort should be made to make certain that all prospects have been contacted, all pledge cards worked, and monies are turned in. COMMUNICATIONS The District Finance Chairman should regularly communicate campaign progress to the community chairman, captains, and enrollers by mail, phone, fax, E-mail and through report meetings. REPORT MEETINGS Scheduled Council report meetings are a key part of the campaign.
District Report meetings should be scheduled monthly (or more frequently) to take advantage of the council report meeting “momentum.” THE CAMPAIGN PROCESS enrollers to ensure a successful campaign. Ask for their prospect lists as soon as possible.
Step 4 Conduct an effective campaign kickoff
Step 5 Send out weekly reminders to everyone involved in the campaign.
Step 6 Conduct campaign report meetings as needed.
Step 7 Hold a victory celebration when the campaign has been completed. Step 1 The District Campaign Chairman must recruit the Community Chairman (where needed) and captains (one captain per 25 prospects). The chairman outlines the duties of the community chairman and captains. Invitations to the orientation meeting are sent to all prospects
Step 2 Assist the community chairman/captains in the recruitment of enrollers.
Step 3 Work with captains and The local council FOS plan of action with
giving levels
Timetables
leadership structuring
job descriptions
campaign resources. FOS Plan of Action View part 2, Basics of FOS View part 1, Scout Family FOS The two suggested organization charts will serve as a guide depending on the size of the campaign. District Friends of Scouting Organization Time’s Up 0:01 0:02 0:03 0:04 0:05 0:06 0:07 0:08 0:10 0:15 0:20 0:25 0:30 0:35 0:40 0:45 0:50 0:55 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 Unit money-earning projects can be planned to serve a dual purpose of conservation and money earning. Collection of aluminum, glass, paper, and scrap metal can be profitable when near a recycling facility. Units should be sure of a market before any collection. A collection must be well planned with adequate adult supervision and safety precautions. Unit Finance Policies No conflict with goods or services offered by established merchants or workmen. Date scheduled not to conflict with established dates of fund-raising in the chartered organization, council, or community.
The name and goodwill of the Boy Scouts of America must be protected and not used as a "front" for commercial interests.
No contract signed by a unit may bind the Boy Scouts of America, either local or national. Unit Finance Policies No direct solicitation for funds by units.
Unit committee is the custodian of funds.
Must submit the Unit Money-Earning Application to the local council
General guidelines for unit money-earning projects include the following:
No gambling, raffles, or conflict with local ordinances.
"Value received for money spent."
Respect territorial rights of other units. Unit Finance Policies Service projects—car wash; forestry projects; collection of paper, aluminum, scrap iron, plastic
Activity involving parents—bake sale, pancake breakfast, spaghetti dinner
Sale of tickets for council show or other events
Sale of commercial product—andy, Christmas trees, first-aid kits, popcorn, light bulbs Unit Finance—Approved Projects Unit Finance Carbon, Emery, Grand, Utah and Washington County
Give support through service
Donors designate gifts to BSA The United Way
Achieve finance goals as approved by the council and district leadership.
Distribute copies of the council and district financial plan. Centennial Quality District Support district activities that involve income and expenses, ensuring proper policy and controls.
Provide recognition to donors, along with information on how their dollars helped serve youth. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members Inform units of unit financing policy and assist in the review and approval of unit requests. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members 9. Support and cultivate a cooperative relationship with the local United Way. Give support through service
Donors can designate gifts to BSA The United Way 7. Support the council “project selling” program. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members Achieve the district’s share of council finance campaigns.
Organize and carry out a successful Friends of Scouting annual campaign, and meet the goal by the targeted date. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members Ensure implement- ation of council finance policies.
Serve as a member of the council finance committee, if so stated in the council bylaws.
Recruit and train a committee to support tasks provided by the council finance committee. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members Turn to page 8 Resources Financial Statement Why Finance?
Camps
Professional Staff
Training
Activities
Service Center/ Scout Shops The Finance Function Budget Today we are interested in you and not your money. We want to teach you how to handle money for the Utah National Parks Council, Boy Scouts of America. Getting Started Understand tasks of the finance committee
Define district finance goals
Identify ways to organize Friends of Scouting
Establish a district enrollment calendar
Understand where money comes from and where it goes
Understand unit finance, policies and procedures
Become aware of available resources Workshop Objectives Part of the District Committee Training Workshop The District Finance Committee The public's regard for Scouting.
The district's use of sound financial procedures. Results viewed two ways Secure goodwill
keep the public informed about Scouting
Done constantly,
not merely during fund raising times. Who Gives and Why? FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP Friends of Scouting - Steps for Getting Enough of the Right People to Solicit Cards
Step 3 – The chairman, district executive and majors, compile a list of prospective campaigners. Begin with leftover names from captains. Every division of your campaign should hold a meeting of its captains to get them oriented and trained. Those captains choose prospective sales representatives they will invite to serve on their team. The list should come from last year's workers, parents, and Friends of Scouting. Note: A captain must be trained before they start recruiting campaigners.
Step 4 – Staff member and division chairman will maintain a master list of prospective majors, captains, and campaigners and who they are assigned to. If additional names are needed, the volunteer can contact either the staff member or chairman for more prospects. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP Key Points in Recruiting/Orienting a Friends of Scouting Chair
Steering committee identifies prospects.
Steering committee identifies members of the recruiting team.
Two volunteers and the district executive recruit--field director is included if the district executive is a new employee.
Two volunteers should be people prospects cannot say no to.
Provide both volunteers with written information on prospect.
Script the recruiting plan – who says what.
You have:
Job description and schedule
Suggested personnel to recruit
Overall organization chart
Other support information depending on experience of prospect:
Information on why BSA has Friends of Scouting
Job description of personnel to recruit FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP
Job description should include:
Title
Campaign Dollar Objective
Specific Duties
Key Dates
Name of Advisor
Job description should be limited to one page. Be honest about what is involved, and use language volunteers can understand. Informing Volunteer Leaders
An important element of recruiting "top" campaign leaders is to clearly inform them of their responsibilities.
When a person is asked to serve in a key position, they should be given a written job description. The person is more likely to accept and perform better if, at the outset, they know what is expected and have pertinent information regarding the position. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE
District steering committee meetings
Recruiting personnel
Personal leadership to keep enrollment on schedule
Detail how the district or Learning for Life executive assumes major assignment
in recording personnel recruited
meeting preparation
working to keep updated records and reports.
7. Prepare and present a one-page job description. When recruiting FOS chair, plan the approach:
1. Discuss the planning meeting.
2. Briefly outline goals.
3. Explain how adequate financial support is essential to goal achievement.
4. Explain district goal and how it is divided for district, community, and family enrollment.
5. Outline the time involved in each of the following:
Council-level meetings of district FOS chairmen FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
VOLUNTEER RECRUITMENT Agree upon the best person and, as a team, recruit the membership chairman.
Dual approach
working relationship between the council and district
maintains district or division identity
uses the best people to recruit the best prospects. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
VOLUNTEER RECRUITMENT Recruiting the District FOS or Learning for Life Annual Gift Chairman
The first and most important item is recruit this chairman.
The district/division chairman should personally participate in recruiting others as well. SAMPLE COMMITTEE MEETING AGENDA

First Steering Committee Meeting
(Should be held in September)
Presiding: _________________________, Enrollment chairman
Attending: Council president, vice president—finance, council finance
committee chairman, council divisions enrollment chairman, district
campaigns chairman, key council finance leaders, Scout executive, and
director of finance
Agenda
I. Introduction and opening remarks Council president
A. Show “Scouting Values” or opening segment of “Fundamental Campaign Methods.”
II. Last year’s report Vice president—finance
A. Review organization structure and amount raised in each division.
B. Distribute campaign analysis by division and districts.
III. This year’s requirements Council president
Discuss how many dollars will be needed and the percent of increase required.
IV. Determine allocation of additional needs to division chairman and districts.
A. Add divisions where needed.
B. Agree upon goals by division and districts.
V. Determine needed leadership and how to recruit. Chairman
VI. Determine plans and committee members to select and evaluate prospects.
VII. Establish calendar Chairman
Confirm key dates including steering committee meeting and victory celebration.
VIII. Closing remarks Council president

NOTE: Agenda items for subsequent meetings should include progress
reports on recruitment, prospect development, evaluations and assignment of
workers, monies in, unrenewed prospects, cleanup plans, and victory
celebration. JOB DESCRIPTION
FOS Campaign Steering Committee Member
Utah National Parks Council
Boy Scouts of America

The Job of the Steering Committee
Objective: Assist in the attainment of the $_______________goal.
Principal Responsibilities
* Select key leadership
* Enroll personally in the upper level of membership
* Actively participate in the prospect and evaluation process
* Accept responsibility in enrolling other upper-level memberships
Throughout the campaign:
1. Analyze status.
2. Determine steps for successful campaign completion.
3. Take necessary action to see that those steps are taken to
ensure successful enrollment.
Calendar
September
Steering committee meeting
Assist in the recruitment of council enrollment chairman if not already
selected, council division chairman, district campaigns chairman
October
Assist in conducting the planning meeting
Help with the upper-level prospects and evaluation meetings
October-April
Attend council steering committee meetings to be held monthly
September-December and twice a month from January until
completion of campaign
Host a leadership dinner
Help with the victory dinner

Staff adviser:
Name:
Title:
Address:
Phone/Contact Info: FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE Every district should have a steering committee.
Every steering committee member should receive a one-page job description when recruited.
There is an example of a job description you can use to create your own (p. 8), as well as a sample of a steering committee meeting agenda (p. 9) see Friends of Scouting Resource Manual FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE Purposes of the committee meetings:
Review status of the campaign
Determine action items for the next meeting to ensure successful on-time completion
Make assignments FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE The first committee meeting should be held in April at a prestigious place.
The committee should meet a minimum of once a month in the fall of the year and once a month from September until campaign completion.
Committee meetings should be action oriented with careful planning. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE Active participants could be the council president, vice president–finance, enrollment chairman, and Scout executive.
Other members could be active past presidents and upper-level contributors.
The key to a successful FOS campaign is broad-based, active volunteer involvement. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE The steering committee is vital to a successful enrollment.
Its primary objective:
ensure campaign success
on-time completion
select campaign leadership.
Qualifications of committee members include:
Key council leaders/top business leaders
Committed to Scouting
Positive attitudes The steering and prospect and evaluation committee
Review prospects
Determine giving ability
Determine who the right person should be to make the solicitation. Campaigns focus on fewer prospects but for larger gifts.
Councils with 90% of their FOS gifts under $100 have 90% of their gifts over $100.
Councils planning a 5-year turnaround could accomplish their objective in only 3 years.
Possible cultivation strategies are considered Increased Upper-Level Giving Scouting Units BSA does not operate units
Local organizations charter units from BSA
BSA provides
service
professional staff
Chartered organizations provide
Meeting place
Maintenance and Utilities
Volunteer leadership
Units conduct approved money-earning projects for unit equipment and expenses Financial Resources Unit enrollment can include Century members and above.
In our council we’ve found a Century membership is easier to get from family enrollment than by putting parents in the district level campaign. ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —MEMBERSHIP LEVELS People will enroll in levels of membership based on:
a) their ability to participate
b) their interest in Scouting.
A $50 membership is all that some donors can or want to give.
Others will have the interest and ability to enroll for a $5,000 benefactor membership. ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —MEMBERSHIP LEVELS ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —KEYS TO SUCCESS Prospect for major gifts
Have precise campaign controls and discipline.
Make a commitment to achieve goals on time.
Analyze giving levels and leadership in preparation for next year’s enrollment.
Plan a victory celebration date prior to the campaign.
Follow the plan. Ninety percent research and preparation
Influential and financially committed Chair-person
Steering committee directs campaign
Prospect and evaluation committee.
Develop a sound plan
Select quality leadership ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? A healthy climate for Scouting begins with good program followed by effective communications.
Annual enrollment is a program of cultivating
individuals served by the council
who support the mission
want involvement in its financial support ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? A vehicle for growth, providing strength in working together for a common cause
A source of human resources for programs as volunteers become more involved in the council’s needs.
An opportunity for personal commitment DISTRICT ENROLLMENT
CALENDAR August
Recruit enrollment personnel in divisions.
Recruit dinner hosts.
September Kick off for these divisions with enrollment dinners as needed:

Benefactor – Patron
Sponsor – Leadership
Guardian – Century 0:09 5:30 The district has responsib- ility to guide units in unit finance practices.
Divide into three groups.
Group 1: List the various expense items that a Scouting unit might have.
Group 2: List a variety of authorized unit fund-raising projects.
Group 3: List nine unit finance policies and guidelines of the BSA.
Allow groups 10 minutes.
Have each group report its results. Unit Finance James E. West 8. Support the council’s endowment development plan. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members
Friends of Scouting
Resource Manual BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA
Finance Support Division Resources
Annual Campaign Plan Book
Guidelines for Developing a Comprehensive
Council Annual Fund-Raising Strategy BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA
Finance Support Division Breakout Session
120 minutes The District Finance Committee FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE Recruit your campaign personnel using proper approach and person
Record recruit on "Personnel Enlistment Report" form.
When recruiting:
Outline the job to be done. Do not under-sell the job
Get acceptance of program, organization, schedule, and goal commitment
Train each enroller
Commit them to see the job through with every prospect worked. Know the number of prospects you plan to solicit and the campaign goals.
Review last year's campaign personnel to select people.
Recruit individual of stature, influence, and means.
Getting the right division chairmen will determine your success or failure.
For 100-150 prospects, get 1 major to recruit 5 captains.
Each Captain recruits 5 workers who will enroll 5 prospects each Discretionary dollars are expected to increase–the problem is not available money
The challenge is for the council to develop an effective FOS campaign and make a persuasive case statement to potential donors.
More than ever, donors are better informed of their giving potential and options.
Also more than ever, other organizations are very sophisticated in their approaches to fund-raising. Trends in Successful
Fund-Raising ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —TIMING A council’s campaign organization should be tailored to meet the goal.
Use different plans to raise $50, $100, $250, or more.
Other council variables: type, size, and geography.
Use different strategies for metropolitan than for rural areas, for small districts than for large, etc. KICKOFF Campaign Kickoff should be spirited and motivational
Foster a spirit of competition between teams
All volunteers should understand
the importance of concluding the campaign on time
attendance at report meetings
timely communication of working cards in person Learning for Life Health and Safety Publicity Advancement Activities and Civic Service Outdoor Promotion Training District Executive Program Committee Finance Committee Membership Committee District Chair District Commissioner DISTRICT Report to the district chairman for your district. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members Council lists projects needing financial support.
District develops donor prospects.
Volunteers make presentations to prospects. Gifts to Special Projects COUNCIL FINANCE COMMITTEE Endowment Product Sales Unit money-earning
and Policy Project Sales Friends of Scouting District Executive Program Committee Membership Committee FINANCE
COMMITTEE DISTRICT CHAIR District Commissioner COUNCIL VICE PRESIDENT
OF DISTRICT OPERATIONS District Finance Committee Supervises money-earning activities
guards policy.
Cooperates with council in insurance matters Other Committee Elements Council lists projects needing financial support.
District develops donor prospects.
Volunteers make presentations to prospects. Gifts to Special Projects Friends of Scouting
Special projects
Special activities and events
Bequests and other deferred giving
Currently the United Way does not give direct support to programs in our area. How People Give to Scouting The public's regard for Scouting.
The district's use of sound financial procedures. Results viewed two ways Secure goodwill
keep the public informed about Scouting
Done constantly,
not merely during fund raising times. Who Gives and Why? People give to
People
Causes
It makes a difference who asks and how Who Gives and Why? FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
DEADLINE--DEADLINE--DEADLINE!! From the very beginning, every leader in a division must be responsible for every person recruited, committing him to attend the orientation, kickoff, and report meetings.
Study carefully all deadlines for recruiting the various groups of sales representatives.
The recruiting schedule must be met. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP Friends of Scouting - Steps for Getting Enough of the Right People to Solicit Cards
Step 1 – The division chairman, with the help of the district executive, needs a list of prospective majors. Call on the most capable people. In selecting prospective majors, look to getting full coverage of area served. Look at team captains who did a good job last year.
Step 2 – The division chairman, with the help of the district executive, compiles a list of prospective captains. Begin with leftover majors. Every division holds a meeting of its majors to orient and train them; then, they should choose the prospective captains to be on their team. Prospective captains list should come from last year's good sales representatives. Note: a major must be trained before they start recruiting their captains. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP
Job description should include:
Title
Campaign Dollar Objective
Specific Duties
Key Dates
Name of Advisor
Job description should be limited to one page. Be honest about what is involved, and use language volunteers can understand. Informing Volunteer Leaders
An important element of recruiting "top" campaign leaders is to clearly inform them of their responsibilities.
When a person is asked to serve in a key position, they should be given a written job description. The person is more likely to accept and perform better if, at the outset, they know what is expected and have pertinent information regarding the position. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE
District steering committee meetings
Recruiting personnel
Personal leadership to keep enrollment on schedule
Detail how the district or Learning for Life executive assumes major assignment
in recording personnel recruited
meeting preparation
working to keep updated records and reports.
7. Prepare and present a one-page job description. When recruiting FOS chair, plan the approach:
1. Discuss the planning meeting.
2. Briefly outline goals.
3. Explain how adequate financial support is essential to goal achievement.
4. Explain district goal and how it is divided for district, community, and family enrollment.
5. Outline the time involved in each of the following:
Council-level meetings of district FOS chairmen FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
VOLUNTEER RECRUITMENT Recruiting the District FOS or Learning for Life Annual Gift Chairman
The first and most important item is recruit this chairman.
The district/division chairman should personally participate in recruiting others as well. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE The degree of any campaign’s success depends upon:
Top leadership
Prospecting and evaluation—determining who has ability an interest to give
The right person making personal solicitation
Campaign controls/ executive direction FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE The first committee meeting should be held in April at a prestigious place.
The committee should meet a minimum of once a month in the fall of the year and once a month from September until campaign completion.
Committee meetings should be action oriented with careful planning. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE Positive leadership is an irreplaceable qualification for each member.
The council enrollment chairman should be selected before the committee’s first meeting.
If the chairman has not been recruited, a major function of the committee is selecting the chairman.
If the proper committee has been selected, the best candidate for chairman is likely to be a member of the committee. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE Active participants could be the council president, vice president–finance, enrollment chairman, and Scout executive.
Other members could be active past presidents and upper-level contributors.
The key to a successful FOS campaign is broad-based, active volunteer involvement. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE The steering committee is vital to a successful enrollment.
Its primary objective:
ensure campaign success
on-time completion
select campaign leadership.
Qualifications of committee members include:
Key council leaders/top business leaders
Committed to Scouting
Positive attitudes Some councils successfully complete campaigns on time by merely scheduling a victory celebration.
This simple act creates great expectations of success.
Councils that campaigned all year (or seldom achieved their goal) found scheduling a victory celebration gave everyone the motivation and enthusiasm needed to make the campaign a success. Victory Celebration Many families would participate in FOS if approached properly. As it turns out, only 25% of potential contributors are even asked to participate.
Make sure all parents are approached with an effective I-C-5 (“I See Five”) contact on unit presentation.
Family enrollment efforts are vital to Scouting’s future Improved Family Enrollment Campaigns are organized around the available leader- ship and their influence – not by a rigid structure.
Many councils have had dramatic results using steering committees that are responsible for the campaign success.
These committees meet to:
Determine campaign status
Decide what needs to be done
Recruit required manpower
Make assignments for action prior to the next meeting Trends in Successful
Fund-Raising • Active steering committee
• Increased upper-level giving
• Involvement of top community leadership
• Trying to increase the potential giving (not just business as usual)
On-time goal achievement and victory celebrations
Shorter campaign time Trends in Successful
Fund-Raising Discretionary dollars are expected to increase–the problem is not available money
The challenge is for the council to develop an effective FOS campaign and make a persuasive case statement to potential donors.
More than ever, donors are better informed of their giving potential and options.
Also more than ever, other organizations are very sophisticated in their approaches to fund-raising. Trends in Successful
Fund-Raising Scouting Dollars Scouting Dollars Local Council Staff and services for member-ship growth and quality program.
Outdoor programs and training facilities
Financing comes from support
Friends of Scouting
Sales
Activity Fees
Investment Income
Special funds from
Foundations
Grants
product sales
project sales Financial Resources Youth members Encouraged to pay personal expenses.
Uniform
personal equipment
registration fee
unit dues
camp fees
covers other personal expenses.
Thrift and personal responsibility have always been objectives of the BSA. Financial Resources The youth member
The community
The nation

All provide resources that make Scouting possible. Financial Resources Founder member $50,000
Pacesetter member $25,000
Distinguished member $10,000
Benefactor member $ 5,000
Sponsor member $ 2,500
Guardian member $ 1,000
Honor member $ 750
Patron member $ 500
Leadership member $ 250
Century member $ 150 ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —MEMBERSHIP LEVELS Build enrollment organization with membership divisions levels.
Council memberships are normally limited to Patron and above.
District memberships usually duplicate council levels, but tend to concentrate on Century to Guardian memberships.
Community membership levels vary. In areas where district enrollment is difficult to organize, memberships frequently include Century members and above ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —MEMBERSHIP LEVELS ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —TIMING To maximize chances of success, involve volunteers at the council, district, and unit levels.
A complete organization is developed for each enrollment with calendar, volunteer leadership, and executive direction. ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —TIMING Follow the fundamental principles of successful fund-raising and for a winning campaign
People give money to people, especially when they’re asked by those with similar or equal standings.
“Peer pressure” usually leads to substantial gifts ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —TIMING The FOS program typically follows a routine timetable.
Campaign momentum and success depends on making the major portion of the goal quickly.
Success in the first part of the council enrollment (the executive board and staff pledges) is a good indicator of how rapidly the council will achieve its goal.
Raising a major portion of the goal early generates great momentum and boosts morale.
The general times for the four phases are:
Council enrollment December-January
District enrollment January
Community enrollment February
Family enrollment Sept/October – Troops
February/March -- Packs ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? To be successful, the annual enrollment must have three elements:
Determining prospective donors’ interest in Scouting
Analyzing prospect’s financial ability to contribute
Determining who is the right person to make the solicitation ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? FOS reflects and defines
Council programs
Constituency perception
The annual enrollment program interprets the achievement of the aims and objectives of Scouting to our constituency—thus the “Promise of Scouting” Campaign for 2007 ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? 84 % of philanthropic gifts come from individuals
75 % from living donors
9 % through bequests
Scouting builds constituency by influencing people who willingly support us on a continuing basis.
Scouting directly influences families of youth, but can be expanded by cultivating those exposed in different ways. Including:
Relatives – Volunteers
Community leaders – Scouting alumni
Members of chartered organizations ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? Authority for the enrollment is found in the Rules and Regulations of the Boy Scouts of America, Article XI, Section 3, Clause 13:

“Sustaining. Persons who desire to be identified with the local council through their financial support and influence in the expansion of the council program may be enrolled as sustaining members of local councils...” ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? Councils use the program to build constituency
Friends of Scouting is the largest source of income
A well-developed FOS program offers benefits beyond the income, including:
An awareness and understanding for council programs
A broad base for support of program resources
New prospects as well as current donors
A measure of independence in program and operation
An annual opportunity to tell the council’s story
An opportunity for a donor to gain personal satisfaction THE FRIENDS OF SCOUTING
RESOURCE MANUAL—PART 1 The Friends of Scouting plan is based on proven fund-raising principles.
The plan has evolved from the successful experiences of local councils.
When councils explain dramatic increases in giving, they report, “We just followed the plan.”
The following slides
describe the basic plan
emphasizes developing trends and techniques Apply what you’ve learned!
Travel safely!
Good Scouting! Thanks For Being A Part of This Training Experience Thank you for your help in obtaining the tangible dollar resources that make council and district services available to expand Scouting for your community's youth. Most of America's youth will never know that you are behind their Scouting growth, but you and the leaders of the council will know.

As the chair of the district finance committee, a committee member, or a part of the district's Friends of Scouting campaign, you will help to make Scouting a dynamic success in your community. DISTRICT ENROLLMENT CALENDAR July-August.
Recruit the following:
Benefactor chairman $5,000
Sponsor chairman $2,500
Guardian chairman $1,000
Patron chairman $500
Leadership chairman $250
Century chairman $150
Prepare prospects lists in the order listed (chairman, district executive, and others assist) DISTRICT ENROLLMENT CALENDAR April-May
District/divisions enrollment chairman recruited.
Chair to info meeting
May-June
Prospect selection and evaluation. CLEAN-UP As the campaign nears completion, a concerted effort should be made to make certain that all prospects have been contacted, all pledge cards worked, and monies are turned in. COMMUNICATIONS The District Finance Chairman should regularly communicate campaign progress to the community chairman, captains, and enrollers by mail, phone, fax, E-mail and through report meetings. KICKOFF Campaign Kickoff should be spirited and motivational
Foster a spirit of competition between teams
All volunteers should understand
the importance of concluding the campaign on time
attendance at report meetings
timely communication of working cards in person The local council FOS plan of action with
giving levels
Timetables
leadership structuring
job descriptions
campaign resources. FOS Plan of Action View part 2, Basics of FOS View part 1, Scout Family FOS The two suggested organization charts will serve as a guide depending on the size of the campaign. District Friends of Scouting Organization Time’s Up 0:01 0:02 0:03 0:04 0:05 0:06 0:07 0:08 0:09 0:10 0:15 0:20 0:25 0:30 0:35 0:40 0:45 0:55 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 Unit money-earning projects can be planned to serve a dual purpose of conservation and money earning. Collection of aluminum, glass, paper, and scrap metal can be profitable when near a recycling facility. Units should be sure of a market before any collection. A collection must be well planned with adequate adult supervision and safety precautions. Unit Finance Policies No conflict with goods or services offered by established merchants or workmen. Date scheduled not to conflict with established dates of fund-raising in the chartered organization, council, or community.
The name and goodwill of the Boy Scouts of America must be protected and not used as a "front" for commercial interests.
No contract signed by a unit may bind the Boy Scouts of America, either local or national. Unit Finance Policies No direct solicitation for funds by units.
Unit committee is the custodian of funds.
Must submit the Unit Money-Earning Application to the local council
General guidelines for unit money-earning projects include the following:
No gambling, raffles, or conflict with local ordinances.
"Value received for money spent."
Respect territorial rights of other units. Unit Finance Policies Service projects—car wash; forestry projects; collection of paper, aluminum, scrap iron, plastic
Activity involving parents—bake sale, pancake breakfast, spaghetti dinner
Sale of tickets for council show or other events
Sale of commercial product—andy, Christmas trees, first-aid kits, popcorn, light bulbs Unit Finance—Approved Projects Unit Finance The district has responsib- ility to guide units in unit finance practices.
Divide into three groups.
Group 1: List the various expense items that a Scouting unit might have.
Group 2: List a variety of authorized unit fund-raising projects.
Group 3: List nine unit finance policies and guidelines of the BSA.
Allow groups 10 minutes.
Have each group report its results. Unit Finance Carbon, Emery, Grand, Utah and Washington County
Give support through service
Donors designate gifts to BSA The United Way
Achieve finance goals as approved by the council and district leadership.
Distribute copies of the council and district financial plan. Centennial Quality District Support district activities that involve income and expenses, ensuring proper policy and controls.
Provide recognition to donors, along with information on how their dollars helped serve youth. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members Inform units of unit financing policy and assist in the review and approval of unit requests. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members 9. Support and cultivate a cooperative relationship with the local United Way. Give support through service
Donors can designate gifts to BSA The United Way James E. West 8. Support the council’s endowment development plan. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members Achieve the district’s share of council finance campaigns.
Organize and carry out a successful Friends of Scouting annual campaign, and meet the goal by the targeted date. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members Ensure implement- ation of council finance policies.
Serve as a member of the council finance committee, if so stated in the council bylaws.
Recruit and train a committee to support tasks provided by the council finance committee. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members Turn to page 8 Resources Financial Statement Why Finance?
Camps
Professional Staff
Training
Activities
Service Center/ Scout Shops The Finance Function Budget Understand tasks of the finance committee
Define district finance goals
Identify ways to organize Friends of Scouting
Establish a district enrollment calendar
Understand where money comes from and where it goes
Understand unit finance, policies and procedures
Become aware of available resources Workshop Objectives Breakout Session
120 minutes The District Finance Committee Part of the District Committee Training Workshop The District Finance Committee Bequests and endowments
come from district people
District people see Scouting in action and decide to give.
District finance
volunteers assist by
encouraging such gifts
coordinating with the council. Bequests and Endowments Scout
EXPO Gingerbread House Festival
Gingerbread House Festival
Scout Expo has a double purpose
unit program enrichment
source of funds through ticket sales.
District finance volunteers
promote ticket sales
manage ticket sales Special Activities and Events District enrollment.
Community enrollment.
Family enrollment. Friends of Scouting FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP Friends of Scouting - Steps for Getting Enough of the Right People to Solicit Cards
Step 3 – The chairman, district executive and majors, compile a list of prospective campaigners. Begin with leftover names from captains. Every division of your campaign should hold a meeting of its captains to get them oriented and trained. Those captains choose prospective sales representatives they will invite to serve on their team. The list should come from last year's workers, parents, and Friends of Scouting. Note: A captain must be trained before they start recruiting campaigners.
Step 4 – Staff member and division chairman will maintain a master list of prospective majors, captains, and campaigners and who they are assigned to. If additional names are needed, the volunteer can contact either the staff member or chairman for more prospects. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP Key Points in Recruiting/Orienting a Friends of Scouting Chair
Steering committee identifies prospects.
Steering committee identifies members of the recruiting team.
Two volunteers and the district executive recruit--field director is included if the district executive is a new employee.
Two volunteers should be people prospects cannot say no to.
Provide both volunteers with written information on prospect.
Script the recruiting plan – who says what.
You have:
Job description and schedule
Suggested personnel to recruit
Overall organization chart
Other support information depending on experience of prospect:
Information on why BSA has Friends of Scouting
Job description of personnel to recruit FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE Recruit your campaign personnel using proper approach and person
Record recruit on "Personnel Enlistment Report" form.
When recruiting:
Outline the job to be done. Do not under-sell the job
Get acceptance of program, organization, schedule, and goal commitment
Train each enroller
Commit them to see the job through with every prospect worked. Know the number of prospects you plan to solicit and the campaign goals.
Review last year's campaign personnel to select people.
Recruit individual of stature, influence, and means.
Getting the right division chairmen will determine your success or failure.
For 100-150 prospects, get 1 major to recruit 5 captains.
Each Captain recruits 5 workers who will enroll 5 prospects each FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
VOLUNTEER RECRUITMENT Agree upon the best person and, as a team, recruit the membership chairman.
Dual approach
working relationship between the council and district
maintains district or division identity
uses the best people to recruit the best prospects. SAMPLE COMMITTEE MEETING AGENDA

First Steering Committee Meeting
(Should be held in September)
Presiding: _________________________, Enrollment chairman
Attending: Council president, vice president—finance, council finance
committee chairman, council divisions enrollment chairman, district
campaigns chairman, key council finance leaders, Scout executive, and
director of finance
Agenda
I. Introduction and opening remarks Council president
A. Show “Scouting Values” or opening segment of “Fundamental Campaign Methods.”
II. Last year’s report Vice president—finance
A. Review organization structure and amount raised in each division.
B. Distribute campaign analysis by division and districts.
III. This year’s requirements Council president
Discuss how many dollars will be needed and the percent of increase required.
IV. Determine allocation of additional needs to division chairman and districts.
A. Add divisions where needed.
B. Agree upon goals by division and districts.
V. Determine needed leadership and how to recruit. Chairman
VI. Determine plans and committee members to select and evaluate prospects.
VII. Establish calendar Chairman
Confirm key dates including steering committee meeting and victory celebration.
VIII. Closing remarks Council president

NOTE: Agenda items for subsequent meetings should include progress
reports on recruitment, prospect development, evaluations and assignment of
workers, monies in, unrenewed prospects, cleanup plans, and victory
celebration. JOB DESCRIPTION
FOS Campaign Steering Committee Member
Utah National Parks Council
Boy Scouts of America

The Job of the Steering Committee
Objective: Assist in the attainment of the $_______________goal.
Principal Responsibilities
* Select key leadership
* Enroll personally in the upper level of membership
* Actively participate in the prospect and evaluation process
* Accept responsibility in enrolling other upper-level memberships
Throughout the campaign:
1. Analyze status.
2. Determine steps for successful campaign completion.
3. Take necessary action to see that those steps are taken to
ensure successful enrollment.
Calendar
September
Steering committee meeting
Assist in the recruitment of council enrollment chairman if not already
selected, council division chairman, district campaigns chairman
October
Assist in conducting the planning meeting
Help with the upper-level prospects and evaluation meetings
October-April
Attend council steering committee meetings to be held monthly
September-December and twice a month from January until
completion of campaign
Host a leadership dinner
Help with the victory dinner

Staff adviser:
Name:
Title:
Address:
Phone/Contact Info: FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE Every district should have a steering committee.
Every steering committee member should receive a one-page job description when recruited.
There is an example of a job description you can use to create your own (p. 8), as well as a sample of a steering committee meeting agenda (p. 9) see Friends of Scouting Resource Manual FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE Purposes of the committee meetings:
Review status of the campaign
Determine action items for the next meeting to ensure successful on-time completion
Make assignments The steering and prospect and evaluation committee
Review prospects
Determine giving ability
Determine who the right person should be to make the solicitation. Campaigns focus on fewer prospects but for larger gifts.
Councils with 90% of their FOS gifts under $100 have 90% of their gifts over $100.
Councils planning a 5-year turnaround could accomplish their objective in only 3 years.
Possible cultivation strategies are considered Increased Upper-Level Giving National Council The national office adds new programs to meet the needs of youth in a changing era.
A national staff employees skilled administrators and specialists in the total program of Scouting.
Four regional offices provide direct service to 300+ councils.
National costs are paid from membership fees, local council service fees, Supply Group and Magazine Division profits, investments, and special grants from foundations, individuals, and corporations Financial Resources Scouting Units BSA does not operate units
Local organizations charter units from BSA
BSA provides
service
professional staff
Chartered organizations provide
Meeting place
Maintenance and Utilities
Volunteer leadership
Units conduct approved money-earning projects for unit equipment and expenses Financial Resources Unit enrollment can include Century members and above.
In our council we’ve found a Century membership is easier to get from family enrollment than by putting parents in the district level campaign. ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —MEMBERSHIP LEVELS ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —TIMING A council’s campaign organization should be tailored to meet the goal.
Use different plans to raise $50, $100, $250, or more.
Other council variables: type, size, and geography.
Use different strategies for metropolitan than for rural areas, for small districts than for large, etc. ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —KEYS TO SUCCESS Prospect for major gifts
Have precise campaign controls and discipline.
Make a commitment to achieve goals on time.
Analyze giving levels and leadership in preparation for next year’s enrollment.
Plan a victory celebration date prior to the campaign.
Follow the plan. Ninety percent research and preparation
Influential and financially committed Chair-person
Steering committee directs campaign
Prospect and evaluation committee.
Develop a sound plan
Select quality leadership ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? A healthy climate for Scouting begins with good program followed by effective communications.
Annual enrollment is a program of cultivating
individuals served by the council
who support the mission
want involvement in its financial support ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? A vehicle for growth, providing strength in working together for a common cause
A source of human resources for programs as volunteers become more involved in the council’s needs.
An opportunity for personal commitment DISTRICT ENROLLMENT
CALENDAR August
Recruit enrollment personnel in divisions.
Recruit dinner hosts.
September Kick off for these divisions with enrollment dinners as needed:

Benefactor – Patron
Sponsor – Leadership
Guardian – Century REPORT MEETINGS Scheduled Council report meetings are a key part of the campaign.
District Report meetings should be scheduled monthly (or more frequently) to take advantage of the council report meeting “momentum.” THE CAMPAIGN PROCESS enrollers to ensure a successful campaign. Ask for their prospect lists as soon as possible.
Step 4 Conduct an effective campaign kickoff
Step 5 Send out weekly reminders to everyone involved in the campaign.
Step 6 Conduct campaign report meetings as needed.
Step 7 Hold a victory celebration when the campaign has been completed. Step 1 The District Campaign Chairman must recruit the Community Chairman (where needed) and captains (one captain per 25 prospects). The chairman outlines the duties of the community chairman and captains. Invitations to the orientation meeting are sent to all prospects
Step 2 Assist the community chairman/captains in the recruitment of enrollers.
Step 3 Work with captains and 0:50 7. Support the council “project selling” program. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members
Friends of Scouting
Resource Manual BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA
Finance Support Division Resources
Annual Campaign Plan Book
Guidelines for Developing a Comprehensive
Council Annual Fund-Raising Strategy BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA
Finance Support Division Today we are interested in you and not your money. We want to teach you how to handle money for the Utah National Parks Council, Boy Scouts of America. Getting Started People will enroll in levels of membership based on:
a) their ability to participate
b) their interest in Scouting.
A $50 membership is all that some donors can or want to give.
Others will have the interest and ability to enroll for a $5,000 benefactor membership. ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —MEMBERSHIP LEVELS ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL CAMPAIGN with the orientation of your steering committee.
Give close attention to the upgrading of giving levels.
Solicit gifts at every meeting. Everyone should be a donor prior to asking others to give.
Keep on schedule.
Don't assume anything. Research and cultivation of prospects occurs all year
90% of successful fundraising is research
Involvement of top community leadership
Place major emphasis on selecting the best available leadership at all levels. Start COUNCIL FINANCE COMMITTEE Endowment Product Sales Unit money-earning
and Policy Project Sales Friends of Scouting District Executive Program Committee Membership Committee FINANCE
COMMITTEE DISTRICT CHAIR District Commissioner COUNCIL VICE PRESIDENT
OF DISTRICT OPERATIONS District Finance Committee Learning for Life Health and Safety Publicity Advancement Activities and Civic Service Outdoor Promotion Training District Executive Program Committee Finance Committee Membership Committee District Chair District Commissioner DISTRICT Report to the district chairman for your district. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members The
District
Journey
to
Excellence Finance Events Unit Organization District Executive Program Committee Finance Committee Membership Committee District Chair District Commissioner DISTRICT Pack Organizer
Troop Organizer
Team Organizer
Crew Organizer Relationships Conferences
Together Plan
Round-ups
Unit to Unit Transition District Membership Committee Apply what you’ve learned!
Travel safely!
Good Scouting! Thanks For Being A Part of This Training Experience How Can You Use Camperships Trail Safety
Winter Sports Activities
Winter Camping Safety
Winter Sports Safety
Special Precautions
Carbon Tetrachloride
Flash Floods
Hantavirus
Knives
Beware of Lightning
Rabies Prevention
Rope Monkey Bridges
Sun Safety Tips
Youth Protection and Child Abuse
Hazing and Initiations Health and Safety
Current Guidelines, Procedures, and Policies Medical Information
Immunizations
Life-Threatening Communicable Diseases
Religious Beliefs and Medical Care
Prescriptions
Serious or Fatal Injuries or Illnesses
Reporting and Records
Transportation
Flying Policy
Hot-Air Balloons
Automobiles
Air Bag Safety Tips
Campers, Trailers, and Trucks
Parade Floats and Hayrides
Boats Health and Safety
Current Guidelines, Procedures, and Policies Sports and Activities
Riding Areas
Safety Procedures and Equipment
Humane Treatment and Health Care of Horses
Coordination of Horsemanship Program Within the Camp Facility’s Overall Program
Emergency First Aid
Choosing the Right Contractor for the Council’s Horse Riding Program
Unauthorized and Restricted Activities
Inspections
Boats
Council Camp
Unit Camping Health and Safety
Current Guidelines, Procedures, and Policies Drug, Alcohol, and Tobacco Use and Abuse
Emergency Service
Coordination with Local Agencies
Fuels and Fire Prevention
Extinguishers
Fireworks
Flammability Warning
Chemical Fuels, Transporting Stoves and Fuel
First Aid
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)
Near-Drowning
First-Aid Kits
First-Aid Log Health and Safety
Current Guidelines, Procedures, and Policies Camping
Age Guidelines
Camp Health and Safety
Emergency Procedures
First-Aid Training
Health Lodge Operations
OSHA Regulations for Bloodborne Pathogens
Universal Precautions for Healthcare Workers/Caregivers
Precamp/Postcamp Inspection
Security
Standards
Camporee Health and Safety
Current Guidelines, Procedures, and Policies Adult Leadership
Trips and Outings
Leadership Requirements for Trips and Outings
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990
Aquatics
BSA Aquatics Instructor
Boat and Canoe Guidelines
BSA Lifeguard
BSA Lifeguard Counselor
BSA Swim Tests
Administration of Swim Classification Test
Mile Swim, BSA Health and Safety
Current Guidelines, Procedures, and Policies Help select leaders and develop programs for
district Cub Scout day camp
resident camp
family camp
Work with commissioners helping units plan and do year-round camping and outdoor programs
Give guidance on health and safety concerns.
Promote camperships for those with need.
Working closely with its officers, guide the Order of the Arrow to help promote camping in the district. How A District Helps Its Units
Camping Committee Guide, pp. 26-29 Major Tasks of the District Camp Promotion and Outdoor Committee
Promote unit participation in council camping
Boy Scout resident camp
Cub Scout day camp
Cub Scout resident camp
Teenage camps and Venturing outdoor activities
In cooperation with unit commissioners, visit unit parents’ meetings to tell the summer camp story and help unit leaders plan for camps. How A District Helps Its Units
Camping Committee Guide, pp. 26-29 Program includes your choice of five great activities:
COPE ropes course and two zip lines
Mountaineering climbing/rappelling
Sherwood medieval battle reenactments
Shooting sports: shotguns, .22’s, archery
24-mile Three Peaks Trek to the top of three 10,000 ft peaks
Frontiersman black powder rifles tomahawk throwing, log cabin building with primitive tools, teepees, sweat lodge, Native American games Desert high adventure wilderness camp experience near Moab, Utah
Choose your 3 to 5 day program from:
climbing/rappelling
biking
whitewater
shooting/archery
sight-seeing at nearby national and state parks
back-packing Entrada High Adventure National Council High Adventure
Summit Bechtel Reserve Take a hike! The mountains of New Mexico offer the adventure that you have always dreamed about.
Backpacking
Rock climbing,
Western lore
Living history
Views from peaks over 10,000 feet tall National Council High Adventure
Philmont Scout Ranch Don’t miss the boat! One of the most beautiful, and remote parts of North America offers a unique opportunity for Scouts.
Canoeing
Hiking
Fishing
Extreme winter camping
Based on and around the beautiful lakes of northern Minnesota and southern Canada adventure awaits you. National Council High Adventure
Northern Tier Make a splash! Head to the Florida Keys and dive into an amazing Florida Sea Base adventure and wade into more excitement than you ever though possible.
Snorkeling
SCUBA
Boating
Beach camping National Council High Adventure
Florida Sea Base Get out and into the excitement offered BSA’s High Adventure Bases!
There are 4 choices
a unique aquatic quest at the Florida Sea Base
Canoeing or winter camping at the Northern Tier
Backpacking expedition at Philmont Scout Ranch.
White water, COPE and Mt Boarding at the Summit National High Adventure Bases Downloadable Booklet [1.03 MB, PDF] Downloadable Flier [486KB, PDF] The Promotion Kit provides adult leaders and parents tools they need to share the summer camp experience with their Scouts.
It is designed to assist you in planning your troop’s attendance at Boy Scout summer camp.
Be sure to use resources provided by your council camping committee.
Scout Leader Flier explains the importance of having each Scout in your troop attend summer camp. Boy Scout Summer Camp
Troop Promotion Kit Since the District Handbook of Operations states your duty is to: “Guide the Order of the Arrow, through the chapter officers and adviser, to help promote camping in the district.
Let’s discuss how to to put the OA to its best use for your committee The four stated purposes of the Order of the Arrow are as follows:
To recognize those Scout campers who best exemplify the Scout Oath and Law in their daily lives
To develop and maintain camping traditions and spirit
To promote Scout camping
To crystallize the Scout habit of helpfulness into a life purpose of leadership in cheerful service to others
Each District Camping Committee should foster the growth of the Order of the Arrow Order of the Arrow Divide into discussions groups
Please discuss how your district can use the audiovisual we have seen to promote camping in your district. Camp Promotion AV Present the Council’s Cub Scout outdoor program, with particular emphasis on outdoor programs for Webelos Scouts.
Show the video Cub Scout Outdoor Program, No. AV-01V011 (9:01 min)
Lead a group discussion of the video:
How is camping a part of an overall marketing plan for Cub Scouting growth?
How does the district camping committee promote camping for Cub Scouts? Cub Scout Camping Back in your seats in 5 min Let’s Take a Break Conduct second parents’ night to explain and adopt final plans for long-term camping by end of April.
Troops, teams, and crews participate in district camporees.
Patrol and troop hikes and overnights prepare boys for summer camp.
Order of the Arrow elections are conducted in each eligible troop. ABC of Camp Promotion The Unit’s Job-Spring Unit officers and leaders plan year-round outdoor program for their unit.
High adventure considered. Year-round outdoor program presented and approved by committee.
Year-round program presented and explained at open house for new members.
OA members take a lead in promoting camping in their own unit.
Provide opportunity for patrols to make early declarations of intention as to summer camp. Provide sign-up rosters by patrols in troops.
Establish camper savings plan. ABC of Camp Promotion The Unit’s Job-Fall Troops, teams, and crews attend long-term camps.
Crews conduct high-adventure tours, trips, and super- activities.
Troops, teams, and crews make reservations for next year’s long-term camps.
Conduct calling out and induction ceremonies for Order of the Arrow (OA) candidates. ABC of Camp Promotion The Unit’s Job-Summer A camping progress chart showing units camping record throughout the year
District meeting
Roundtables
Reveals lack of camping in unit programs.
In this case it’s an early warning signal that one unit is in real trouble and three need help. Camping Progress Chart Roundtable and Forum feature on unit outdoor program.
Conduct pre-camp training for unit leadership.
Order of the Arrow elections.
District camporees.
Promote long-term camp participation and high adventure at camporees and Venturing activities.
Review status of reservations for long-term camps and take action to follow up on troops and teams not signed up. ABC of Camp Promotion
The District’s Job: Spring Anniversary Week outdoor exhibits. High-adventure presentation at commissioner meetings. ABC of Camp Promotion
The District’s Job: Winter Continue outdoor promotion at unit committee meetings and meetings of leaders and parents.
Roundtable, Forums, and district meetings, features on outdoors, long-term camping, high adventure. ABC of Camp Promotion
The District’s Job: Winter Recognize units with year-round outdoor program.
Visit roundtables and Venturing Forums with high-adventure AV media. ABC of Camp Promotion
The District’s Job: Fall Schedule unit visitations.
Work with OA on promotion plans.
Camping committee recruited to full strength (1 adult for every 5 units or strengthen COPC Unit Commissioner interface). ABC of Camp Promotion
The District’s Job: Fall Assist units with youth recruiting.
Recognize unit camp leadership at roundtables, meetings, on-line and in bulletins. ABC of Camp Promotion
The District’s Job: Fall Establish goals for summer camp.
Conduct training in promotion skills. ABC of Camp Promotion
The District’s Job: Fall District camping committee plans for promotion and recruits committee to full strength--one adult for every 5 units or strengthen your COPC interface with Unit Commissioners. ABC of Camp Promotion
The District’s Job: Summer Commissioners’ meeting at summer camp. ABC of Camp Promotion
The District’s Job: Summer District meeting at summer camp.
(District camping committee promotes and acts as hosts). ABC of Camp Promotion
The District’s Job: Summer Distributes camp promotion packet to units
Makes a "where to go camping" book for units
Takes work parties to help improve facilities at camp
Works with district Scouters to visit units and tell the camping story to youth as adults tell the story to adults ABC of Camp Promotion
The Order of the Arrow’s Job A subcommittee on promotion should guide the plan.
This will include
securing basic materials for distribution to districts
guiding district camping committees in following up on a plan. ABC of Camp Promotion
The Council’s Job Please turn to appendix 7
page 47 so that we can
discuss The ABCs of
Camp Promotion ABCs of Camp Promotion Guide the Order of the Arrow, through the chapter officers and adviser, to help promote camping in the district. Track and attain camping and outdoor objectives.
Implement the planned council camping and outdoor programs. Major Tasks of the Committee
Give guidance on Health and Safety concerns
Promote age appropriate youth participation in camping and outdoor programs:
Boy Scout resident camp
National high-adventure programs
Cub Scout outdoor program
Venturing outdoor program. Major Tasks of the Committee Implement the outdoor promotion program
Work with commissioners to
help unit’s plan year round outdoor and camping program


6. Promote camperships Major Tasks of the Committee Report to district program chairman
Recruit and orient enough of the right kind of people for the district camping committee.
Understand each unit’s camping and outdoor record. Major Tasks of the Committee Using page 13 of Handbook for District Operations, let’s get a quick overview of the tasks of the District Camping and Outdoor Program Committee Chairman and Members Major Tasks of the Committee Our councils challenge is to—
Make effective district camping and outdoor program promotion plans.
Provide resources in facilities and equipment
Provide staff, volunteer as well as professional, essential to the success of the outdoor program.
Provide opportunities for quality camping and outdoor programs.
Good stewardship of all camp properties. The Camping Challenge Boy Scout Leaders who take their boys to camp for a week will have 80 more hours to develop relationships with their boys
If they will take them for 10 days and nights of camping it increases to 160 more hours!
Council Statistics for a past summer
Only 1 in 100 Venturers reported any High Adventure experience
Only 1 in 33 Varsity Scouts reported any HA or long-term camp
Only 1 in 6.25 Boys Scouts reported a long-term camp The Camping Challenge Key Resources How many of you went to camp as a youth?
What has your childhood camping experience meant in your life?
How many here were in the military? Have you ever slept in a pup tent? Was it fun? Let’s Get Started Part of the District Committee Training Workshop District Camping and
Outdoor Program Committee You Challenge is to Give a Mountain Top Experience Foster citizenship through service to others.
Community service projects at the unit, district, and council levels.
Respond to real needs and concerns of the community
Not make-work or make-believe needs. Civic Service Activities
Camporee Guide What is a Camporee?
See pages 2-6. Quickly form nine work teams.
review their assigned committee job
report to the total group.
Competitive games and activities can be combined into a major camporee-wide event
Using the same work teams as above, each team pick one activity from pp10-20 of the Camporee Guide.
five to eight minutes to review
understand how to set it up.
Aspects of a camporee
Budget and control Camporees This subcommittee is responsible for inviting through letters and personal contacts the special guests of the activity. Arrange for their reception and provide Eagle Scouts, Arrowmen, or similar guides to escort them.
You must publicize the event ahead of time if the public is to attend, and while it is going on and afterward whether it is open to the public or not. Remember that Scouting activities help sell the Scouting program to the community. It's up to the public relations subcommittee to make the public aware of the event. You might use newspaper stories, photos, or editorials; radio spots or interviews; TV spots, interviews, demonstrations, panels; posters in windows or cars; billboards; signs at the site; announcements or talks by boys for service clubs and other organizations; the Internet; parade or motorcade; and windows and in-store displays at local Scouting distributors.
Give local units guidelines on running their own campaigns. Prepare copy for all releases. Arrange for photographs of preparations and for photos or videos of the actual event. Arrange for media coverage and set up a reception area for the press at the event.
The printed program for the event is also your responsibility. Programs in which you sell advertising space should be carefully considered. Many are so complicated and expensive that they will probably only cost money in the end and may hurt other council finance efforts. Public Relations Setting the budget is a critical responsibility. Rallies, camporees, and other types of events will not produce any income, but they should be budgeted to control expenses. Any income earned should be used to expand the program services of the council and to increase boy membership, although this decision is up to the executive board.
Income probably will come from the council budget, participation fees (if any), profit from concessions (if any), and ticket sales (if appropriate). Expenses might include rent for facilities, printing, postage, PA system or sound or music, equipment rental, stationery and supplies, awards and prizes, commissions (if tickets are sold), and support services. Be sure you have arranged for adequate insurance coverage. Be sure you exercise budgetary control and audit the final statement. Finance This subcommittee is responsible for the event facility and all the physical properties needed. You may have to provide special items for units (who will reimburse you) if the event committee has so decided. If needed, 24-hour guard duty is your responsibility. Lighting, loading and unloading of equipment, and distribution of printed programs are also your responsibility. Physical Arrangements For arena shows and recognition dinners you'll need a staging subcommittee to prepare the final script, recruit the cast, and arrange the stage traffic. They take the story line and add narration (as little as possible) and sound and lighting (as much as can be well handled). To select the cast, assign program segments to Scouting units that will select the individual boys. Give key units the most difficult parts. Special groups like Order of the Arrow dancers may be needed. Except for special parts, hold rehearsals by units. Have a walk-through for the key people on the show site before the show opens.
Arranging the stage traffic involves setting up the stage or performance area, having it clearly marked, having a large, well-identified crew, allowing for the flow of actors on and off the performing area, and providing adequate backstage space and entertainment for actors awaiting their cues. Staging The responsibility for getting every unit involved belongs to the promotion subcommittee. How the members contact the units is up to them, but they certainly should use the promotion experts of the district activities committee or program team and the commissioner staff to get participation by unit leaders.
They should keep a running record of units signed up and keep after those who aren't. Getting information and applications to the leaders, handling the applications which come in, and keeping the program committee aware of the participation figures are their responsibilities. Promotion This subcommittee establishes the theme on which the event, its preparation and promotion, centers.
It develops a story line if that is appropriate, working in ideas that units have submitted.
It then details the program into events or acts, the number of units to take part, where and how they are to be arranged, what facilities and equipment will be needed, who is in charge of each portion of the activity, and what the timing of each part will be. Program





p 21 Shows the community what Scouts can do
Helps youth to develop poise before an audience.
Scouting skills become polished
Interprets current council, district, and unit program.
Choose a
booth show where the public walks booth to booth
an arena show performed before a seated audience
a combination of those two
a camporee-show combination
a Scout parade that develops a theme or story as the parade passes
a shopping mall show
Make generous use of the Display Award, No. 7119. Display Events Help youth learn specific qualities of citizenship through service
You might choose a project to serve in any of these areas:
children,  conservation
Scouting for Food  emergency service
senior citizens  improving the community physically
Hospitals  taking part in celebrations
Safety  helping community government
Recreation  emphasizing historical, patriotic, or international heritage.
Any activity you select or create must have a definition and purpose, be real to the Scouts, involve them through democratic processes, require some kind of preparation from them, become a significant action, and be compatible with the objectives of the Scouting movement.
Good Turn for America is an initiative to help districts and councils carry out the BSA's community service commitment. Civic Service Activities From the unit point of view, the master plan system:
Lets the unit incorporate council and district activities into its annual plan.
Suggests challenging unit programs leading up to each council or district event.
Avoids clashes between unit plans made long in advance and spur-of-the-moment plans for council and district activities.
Helps units give their Scouts a well-rounded, adventurous program. How the Council and
Districts Work Together The master plan system benefits the council, its districts, and units.
From the council and district point of view, this plan:
Avoids last-minute announcements of council and district activities—an irritant to unit leaders.
Gets more participation from boys and leaders because the units are given plenty of time to incorporate council and district events in unit plans.
Permits good timing of big activities, with less likelihood of scheduling too many or too few.
Improves the quality of council and district activities because project or task force members can be assigned well in advance and there is more time to recruit experts whose special skills may be needed. How the Council and
Districts Work Together Draw up a master plan for a year of activities.
Districts make there input into the plan.
Unit leaders have a voice through the annual activity poll.
Districts supplement the plan with local activities How the Council and
Districts Work Together HIGHLIGHTS
FOR THE DISTRICT
ACTIVITIES AND CIVIC
SERVICE COMMITTEE
. . . An Overview Staging
Recognition
Meetings
Camporee Guide Key Resources Bring the slogan alive
Involve Scouts in service projects that
help others
while helping our young people to develop in stature
become responsible members of the community. Do a Good Turn Daily Create and promote activities and ceremonies
Inspire Scouts, leaders, parents, and the general public to want to participate in and support Scouting Our Job What was the most exciting event you have attended lately?
Tell why or how the event was exciting
Were you
Proud?
Patriotic?
Inspired? Activities and Civic Service FALSE The activities and civic service committee plans camporees in the district
FALSE The camping committee is responsible for the Order of the Arrow
FALSE The activities and civic service committee plan the annual award banquet.
FALSE The activities and civic service committee teaches annual program planning to units True or False Answers The camping committee plans camporees in the district
The activities and civic service committee is responsible for the Order of the Arrow, BSA’s service organization for campers
The advancement and recognition committee plan the annual award banquet.
The training committee teaches program planning annually to units True or False Quick Quiz Activities and Civic Service Apply what you’ve learned!
Travel safely!
Good Scouting! Thanks For Being A Part of This Training Experience Meaningful advancement goals cannot be set without keeping accurate records.
For the most part advancement records are kept through On-line Advancement.
Some units continue to use the manual report, which we file with their other advancement history. A good advancement program requires teamwork between council and district advancement committees and the commissioner staff.
The council advancement committee provides the guidelines , supervision, and promotion of the advancement program.
The council service center is responsible for keeping records and distribution of awards. Council Advancement Committee Distinguished Eagle Scout Award
is awarded to an Eagle Scout for distinguished service in his profession and to his community for a period of at least twenty-five years after attaining the level of Eagle Scout. Other requirements include significant accomplishment in one's career and a solid record of continued community volunteer involvement. It is the only BSA award given to adults that is dependent upon the recipient's association in the BSA as a youth. Recipients are known as Distinguished Eagle Scouts. District and Council Awards Spirit of the Eagle Award
The Spirit of the Eagle Award is an honorary posthumous special recognition for a registered youth member who has lost his or her life in a tragic accident or through illness.
This award is bestowed by the National Court of Honor as part
of the celebration of life of this young person. The award recognizes the joy, happiness, and life-fulfilling experiences that the Scouting program made in this person's life. District and Council Awards Local Council Certificate of Merit
A Local Council Certificate of Merit is available for recognizing acts that the council committee does not feel qualify for national recognition but should receive some recognition.
The case is not extraordinary, did not call for unusual skill and was not exceptional in nature but was of outstanding service and did reflect the high ideals of Scouting.
The council advancement committee should conduct the investigation and review carefully to maintain the integrity of the certificates. District and Council Awards The Meritorious Action Awards are:
Medal of Merit. The Medal of Merit may be awarded to a youth member or adult leader who has performed an act of service of a rare or exceptional character that reflects an uncommon degree of concern for the well-being of other people.
National Certificate of Merit. The National Certificate of Merit may be awarded to a youth member or adult leader who has performed a significant act of service that is deserving of special national recognition.
All applications should be submitted to the National Court of Honor through the local council upon duly prescribed forms, and it shall be within the discretion of the National Court of Honor to determine which, if any, type of recognition shall be given.
Award recipients must have been registered members of the BSA at the time the action was performed. District and Council Awards Lifesaving and meritorious awards
The awards are as follows:
Heroism Award may be awarded to a youth member or adult leader who has demonstrated heroism and skill in saving or attempting to save human life at minimum risk to self. District and Council Awards Silver Beaver Award
In extraordinary cases, the Silver Beaver Award may be made by the National Court of Honor to a Scouter upon the recommendation of Scouting authorities who have supervision of one or more units of the Boy Scouts of America, located outside of the United States, and not under the jurisdiction of a local council. District and Council Awards Silver Beaver Award
The award is made for noteworthy service of exceptional character to youth by registered volunteer Scouters within the territory under the jurisdiction of a local council.
As evidence of the award there shall be presented:
a suitable certificate, duly authenticated by the Boy Scouts of America, pursuant to the action of the National Court of Honor; and
a miniature silver beaver suspended by a blue and white ribbon to be worn around the neck.
It shall be general policy that no public announcements shall be made by the local council in advance of action by the National Court of Honor with reference to names presented for consideration. District and Council Awards District Award of Merit Requirements:
Must be a registered Scouter.
Must have rendered noteworthy service to youth in or out of Scouting, or both.
Consideration must be given to the nominee's Scouting position and the corresponding opportunity to render outstanding service beyond the expectations of that Scouting position.
The nominee's attitude toward and cooperation with the district, division, and/or council is to be taken into consideration. District and Council Awards Index of Growth Improvement of advancement and award earning
Increase in outdoor program or activity participation
Importance of program planning and budgeting Centennial Quality Unit Award Requirements Direct contact leaders trained
Retention of members and recruitment of new members.
Additional adults involved as a part of the National Parent Initiative. Centennial Quality Unit Award Requirements Sea Scout advancements are approved by the ship's quarterdeck.
In the case of the Quartermaster Award, the application is reviewed by the ship's committee with a member of the district advancement committee as chairman.
Since the Quartermaster Award is a Venturing recognition, it may be earned by any young man or young woman registered as a Venturer. Sea Scout Advancements Past Credit
All requirements for all awards require Venturers to do work as Venturers.
If they earned the Backpacking merit badge as a Boy Scout, they must do all that is required in the Ranger backpacking elective while registered as a Venturer.
Some requirements require certifications such as Scuba Open-Water Diver, American Red Cross Standard First Aid, or BSA Lifeguard.
This certification may be used as long as it is still current, no matter when it was earned Special Considerations The TRUST Award will help Venturers learn about themselves, their communities, and their religion and culture, as well as those of others.
They must complete five areas of requirements with the support of a religious leader in their community. Trust An additional rank/growth opportunity for Sea Scouts, based on seamanship skills.
It requires a pre-approved plan of action and a board of review.
The Sea Scouting Bronze is half of Quartermaster Quartermaster The Ranger Award is an additional award/growth opportunity based on outdoor/high-adventure requirements.
A Venturer must complete eight requirements and at least four of 18 electives.
The Outdoor Bronze Award is half of Ranger.
There is no board of review. Ranger Award The highest award for Venturers.
In addition to earning a Bronze and Gold award, Venturers do additional work in the areas of:
leadership
emergency preparedness
ethics
Silver requires a pre-approved plan of action and a crew review. Silver
Identify trained and highly motivated Venturers who will be a training, leadership, and program resource for other Venturers, Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts, organizations, and the community. The Venturing advancement program is available to all Venturing members
Its purpose is to
Provide a pathway for personal development.
Encourage Venturers to learn, grow, and serve.
Recognize the high level of achievement for their skills. Venturing Advancement Activity Pins for Ultimate
Adventures Backpacking Canoe Camping
Caving and Rappelling Survival
Cross-Country Skiing Cycling
Discovering Adventure Fishing
Freestyle Biking Frontiersman
Mechanics Orienteering
Rock Climbing Roller Hockey
Shooting Sports Snow Camping
Softball Swimming
Triathlon Waterskiing
Whitewater Canoeing Basketball
Bowling Soccer
Tennis Volleyball For young men from 14 to 18 years
Position of responsibility for Star and Life ranks may be met by serving as a team captain, co-captain, program manager, squad leader, or in other leadership roles assigned by the Coach.
Acceptable positions for the Eagle are listed on the Eagle Application.
The Varsity Scout Coach will conduct a Coach conference.
Boards of review are conducted by the team committee member responsible for advancement, the advancement program manager, and the Varsity Scout Coach for all ranks except Eagle Scout. Varsity Scout Advancement Time’s Up 0:01 0:02 0:03 0:04 0:05 0:06 0:07 0:08 0:09 0:10 0:15 0:20 0:25 0:30 0:35 0:40 0:45 0:50 0:55 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 Back in your seats in 15 min Let’s Take a Break Although the project idea must be approved before work is begun, the board of review must determine the manner in which the project was carried out. Questions that must be addressed include:
Did the candidate demonstrate leadership of others?
Did he indeed direct the project rather than do all of the work himself?
Was the project of real value to the religious institution, school, or community group?
Who from the group benefiting from the project may be contacted to verify the value of the project?
Did the project follow the approved plan or were modifications needed to bring it to its completion?
All the work on the project must be done while the candidate is a Life Scout and before the candidate's 18th birthday, unless a time extension has been allowed. The Approval Process Upon completion of the project, the Eagle Scout Service Project Workbook, properly filled out, is submitted with the Scout's Eagle application to include the following information.
What was the project?
How did it benefit others?
Who from the group benefiting from the project gave guidance?
Who helped carry out the project?
What materials were used and how were they acquired? The Approval Process The service project may not be performed for a business, or be of a commercial nature, or be a fundraiser.
Routine labor, a job or service normally rendered, should not be considered.
There is no minimum number of hours that must be spent on carrying out the project. The amount of time spent must be sufficient for the Scout to clearly demonstrate leadership skills.
The Eagle Scout Service Project Workbook, No. 18-927D, must be used to meet this requirement.
the Scout must secure the prior approval of his unit leader,
his unit committee, and
the benefactor of the project.
the district advancement committee must also review and approve the project to make sure that it meets the stated standards for Eagle Scout service projects before the project is started. Eagle Service Projects For a service project to qualify as an Eagle Scout service project, the Scout, while a Life Scout
plan, develop, and give leadership to others in a service project
benefiting any religious institution, school, or community
conform to the wishes and regulations of those for whom the project is undertaken.
The Eagle Scout service project provides the opportunity for the Eagle Scout candidate to demonstrate the leadership skills
He does the project outside the sphere of Scouting.
As a demonstration of leadership, the Scout
must plan the work
organize the personnel needed
direct the project to its completion.
(Service to others is important. Work involving council property or other BSA activities is not acceptable for an Eagle Scout service project.) Eagle Service Projects Star and Life Ranks
A Scout must perform six hours of service to others.
This may be done as an individual project or as a member of a patrol or troop project.
Star and Life service projects may be approved for Scouts assisting on Eagle service projects.
The Scoutmaster approves the project before it is started. Service Projects Second Class Rank
A Scout must participate in a service project or projects approved by his Scoutmaster.
The time of service must be a minimum of one hour.
This project prepares a Scout for the more involved service projects he must perform for the Star, Life, and Eagle Scout ranks. Service Projects If the board decides that the Scout is not ready to advance,
He should be told what he has not done satisfactorily.
Most accept responsibility for not completing requirements properly.
The board should specify what must be done to rework weaknesses and schedule another board of review.
A follow-up letter confirming actions necessary for advancement.
If the Scout disagrees with the decision, the appeal procedures should be explained to him. More on Boards of Review
At the conclusion of the review, the board should know whether a boy is qualified for advancement.
The Scout is asked to leave the room while the board members discuss his achievements.
The decision of the board of review is arrived at through discussion and must be unanimous.
If members are satisfied that the Scout is ready to advance, he is called in, congratulated, notified as to when he will receive his recognition, and encouraged to continue his advancement or earn the next Palm. More on Boards of Review Scouts who are not advancing should also come before the board of review.
The board should show interest in these Scouts' rank progress. Ask these kinds of questions to see why they are not advancing:
Do you enjoy the outings/troop meetings?
Which of the requirements are most difficult for you?
Do you find that school activities are taking more of your time? Which ones?
Let the Scout know that he has the support of the board
The review should take approximately 15 minutes. More on Boards of Review The Troop Committee Guidebook p. 30 suggests questions that could be asked during a review.
What do you like most in troop outdoor activities?
What new things did you do/learn on your latest campout/service project/troop meeting?
What did you learn/feel in giving service to others?
Why is being a Boy Scout important to you?
What are your goals in Scouting?
How will fulfilling requirement number _______ help you? More on Boards of Review It is not an examination.
The Scout has learned and been examined—this is a review.
The Scout could be asked
where he learned the skill
who taught him
value he gained from passing this requirement
The Scout reviews what he did
The Board determines whether he did what he was supposed to do. More on Boards of Review It should be the desire of the board to encourage the Scout to talk so that the review can be a learning experience for the candidate and the members of the board. Many boys are ill at ease when talking to adults, it is important the board be held in a relaxed atmosphere.
A certain amount of formality and meaningful questioning should be used.
The Scout should be neat in his appearance and his uniform should be as correct as possible, with the badges worn properly. More on Boards of Review One member serves as chairman, usually the committee member responsible for advancement.
Unit leaders, assistant unit leaders, relatives, or guardians may not serve as members of a Scout's board of review. After completing all requirements for Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, and Life ranks, or an Eagle Palm, he appears before a board of review.
This board of review is made up of at least three and not more than six members of the troop committee. Tenderfoot Through Life Ranks and Eagle Palms If an Eagle Scout board of review is held after the six months following the candidate's 18th birthday,
the Eagle Scout must petition the National Boy Scout Committee for an extension of time to hold the board of review.
The petition must be processed through the local council, detailing the extenuating circumstances that prevented the board of review from being held within the six-month period following the candidate's 18th birthday, and be accompanied with a copy of the Eagle Scout Rank Application. Scouts 18 or older Scouts A discussion of the Scout Oath and Scout Law to make sure he recognizes and understands the value of Scouting in his home, unit, school, and community.
The decision of all boards of review is arrived at through discussion and must be unanimous.
When a boy completes his board of review for Eagle or Palm tenure for his next rank begins immediately. Boards of Review The board does not retest the candidate.
The board should attempt to determine the Scout's attitude and his acceptance of Scouting's ideals.
The board should make sure that good standards have been met in all phases of the Scout's life. Boards of Review A periodic review of
Progress for Scouts who are ready for the next rank
Review those Scouts who have shown no progress
Make sure the Scout has done what he was supposed to do.
See how good an experience he is having in the Troop.
Encourage the Scout to progress further. Boards of Review Using Advancement Committee Policies and Procedures, pages 12–14,
Explain our council and district plan for recruiting and training merit badge counselors.
Distribute copies of a typical merit badge counselor list. Merit Badges The four steps in Boy Scout advancement:
Learning
Testing
Reviewing
Recognition
Discuss what your council and districts do to promote Boy Scout advancement. Boy Scout Advancement Turn to page 23 of Advancement Committee Policies and Procedures.
The ranks are
Tenderfoot
Second Class
First Class
Star
Life
Eagle Boy Scout Advancement Districts Help Pack Advancement Programs Stress the importance of regular advancement reports from the pack to the council service center.
Promote prompt awarding of badges to the boys.
Encourage the Cub Scout pack to participate in council or district advancement programs.
Encourage Arrow of Light Award achievement. Districts Help Pack Advancement Programs Unit commissioners explain advancement to new leaders.
Visit the pack leaders' meeting at least once a year to review the Cub Scout advancement plan.
Emphasize the importance of each Cub Scout earning the appropriate rank for his age. Requirements are found in the Webelos Handbook
Webelos badge and Arrow of Light requirements include the joining requirements for the Scout badge. Webelos rank
Arrow of Light Award
20 activity badges
Webelos den leader approves work Webelos Requirements Complete Bobcat requirements
Completes 12 of 25 achievements
Awarded badge in Pack Meeting
Works on the 25 electives in the Bear Handbook to earn arrow points as he did for Wolf.
As with the Wolf rank, completion of the requirements is approved by the boy's parents. Bear Requirements A Cub Scouting must earn his Bobcat badge before being awarded the rank of Wolf, Bear, or Webelos.
He must learn
Cub Scout Promise
Law of the Pack
signs and symbols of Cub Scouting
His parents determine when he has mastered them. Bobcat Requirements Earns the Tiger Cub belt totem by learning the Tiger Cub motto, Cub Scout sign, and Cub Scout salute.
Then works on 15 achievement requirements for Tiger Cub rank.
Then can earn electives through activities in his book.
All requirements for both the Tiger Cub achievements and electives are found in the Tiger Cub Handbook.
These simple requirements are approved by the adult partner by signing the boy's handbook. Tiger Cub Requirements Cub Scout Advancement The ranks in Cub Scouting are
Bobcat
Tiger
Wolf
Bear
Webelos
Arrow of Light Award Cub Scouting
Boy Scouting
Varsity Scouting
Venturing Advancement is a Method for All Scouting Programs What is Advancement? Education and fun are important functions of Scouting, they are the basis of advancement.
A fundamental principle is that youth members progress as a result of participation.
Units with good program advance youth naturally through unit activities, and by taking advantage available of advancement opportunities. A process by which youth members progress from rank to rank.
Ranks are simply a means to an end, not an end in them- selves.
Everything youth do to advance, from the day they join until they leave Scouting, should be designed to help them have an exciting and meaningful experience. What is Advancement? Review and approve Eagle Scout service project plans submitted by Eagle Scout candidates.\
Participate in troop/crew boards of review, or conduct district-level Eagle Scout candidate boards of review.
If an Eagle Scout board of review is held at the unit level, at least one district/council advancement committee member must serve on the board.
Promote crew review boards led by the crew president for Gold/Silver awards. Major Tasks of the Committee Publish and maintain a current list of merit badge counselors.
Recommend youth members and unit and district Scouters for special awards and recognition (lifesaving awards, Silver Beaver, etc.)
Implement council advance-ment and recognition programs. Major Tasks of the Committee Recruit and orient enough of the right kind of people for all aspects of the committee function.
Establish district advancement goals, develop a plan to achieve them, and track their attainment.
Assist packs, troops, teams, and crews and evaluate their progress as needed. Major Tasks of the Committee Report to the district chairman for your district.
Stimulate advancement and recognition of Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, and Venturers.
Ensure units establish and maintain proper advancement procedures in accordance with national policies. Major Tasks of the Committee Implements procedures that help achieve BSA advancement procedures.
Helps Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Varsity teams, and Venturing crews succeed.
Units help youth members advance in rank. If they advance:
they will have a good experience
will grow in their Scouting adventure. District Advancement and
Recognition Committee Key Resources Provide the climate for a good advancement program. Were you a
Cub Scout
Boy Scout
Explorer or Venturer
Were you a
First Class Scouts
Star Scout
Life Scout
Eagle Scout Were you a Scout? Breakout Session
120 minutes The Advancement and Recognition Committee Resources Low-income urban/inner-city areas
Isolated/low-income rural areas
Hispanics
African-Americans
American Indian communities and tribal groups
Various Asian nationality groups
Persons with disabilities
Others ScoutReach
Target Markets Commissioners lead the effort
in membership growth by through youth tenure
more youth reregistered at charter renewal. Growth from Increasing Tenure/Charter Renewal The commissioner staff leads the district's efforts in membership growth by preventing dropped units.
Commissioners give special help to units with major needs and problems. Growth from Stopping Dropped Units Act to grow Scouting
Conduct events and activities that
Organize new Scouting units
New members joining existing units
Give Every Kid a Chance Recruitment and Additional Enrollment Growth Successful new-unit organization requires teamwork and careful attention to the 12 steps discussed.
Skip a step and that becomes a weak link in the process.
Remember that following each step closely helps ensure strong new-unit organization and reinforces the unit's ability to build tenure and develop quality leaders.
It's up to the district executive, new-unit organizer, and unit commissioner—with support from district committee members—to work as a team with the chartered organization toward a common goal. Follow All 12 Steps Later on, the process will involve other members of the district committee
members of the training committee.
unit commissioners continue to nurture and serve the new units.
Take no shortcuts in new-unit organization.
Omit a step and the new unit will likely suffer.
A unit that is organized using all the time-tested steps stands an excellent chance of enjoying a long tenure. Following the Plan Makes the sale.
Helps the organizing committee assume responsibility.
Continues working with other chartered organizations in the early stages of unit organization.
Advises and supports the new-unit organizer. The District Executive
Function of membership committee.
Each prospective new unit should have an assigned organizer.
A new-unit organizer can work with more than one unit at a time. The New-Unit Organizer To get more youth into Scouting, have more units available for them to join.
One person can't effectively organize a new unit
It takes a team:
the district executive
new-unit organizer
unit commissioner
trainer
and is supported by district committee members. Teamwork, Planning,
and the Process 7. Train the Leaders.
8. Plan and Organize the Program
9. Recruit Youth Members
10. Complete the Paperwork
11. First Unit Meeting
12. Charter Presentation/ Follow Up 1. Identify the Prospect
2. Approach the Prospect
3. Make the Sales Call (Presentation)
4. Organization Adopts the Program
5. Organizing Committee Meets
6. Select and Recruit Key Leaders Organizing Steps Complete the successful organization of one new traditional unit
Follow all procedures in the “New Unit Organization Process” (No. 34196)
leadership is trained,
program is organized and in operation
unit committee is functioning
unit commissioner assigned
all paperwork is completed and processed
unit charter is presented to the chartered organization.
For units organized after March 1, 2005. William D. Boyce New-Unit Organizer Award Growth from New Units Responsibility of the district membership committee.
Council Together Plan
Present the council's together plan, event, or other plans.
Organizers
Discuss the district's task in recruiting and training organizers for new units. New units
Recruitment and additional enrollments
Program transitions
Stop dropped units
Increase tenure/more youth reregistered at unit charter renewal Sources of
Membership Growth Cultivate present chartered organizations
expressions of appreciation
organizational heads visits
recognitions for tenure
Mainly a "door opening" function which
A committee person: religious, educational, and civic Relationships Establishes relationships with community organizations
Organizes new units
Recruits youth Membership Committee Reports to district chair
Serves on council membership/relation-
ships committee
Manages team to for a variety of activities.
Meets district membership objectives.
Recruits adults Membership Chair Resources Encourage community organizations to use the Scouting program
Conduct relationships conferences Charter Concept Chartered by Congress Understand charter concept
Define membership committee functions
Identify sources of membership growth
Able to use organizing steps
Know target markets
Become aware of available resources Workshop Objectives Bequests and endowments
come from district people
District people see Scouting in action and decide to give.
District finance
volunteers assist by
encouraging such gifts
coordinating with the council. Bequests and Endowments Council lists projects needing financial support.
District develops donor prospects.
Volunteers make presentations to prospects. Gifts to Special Projects Friends of Scouting
Special projects
Special activities and events
Bequests and other deferred giving
Currently the United Way does not give direct support to programs in our area. How People Give to Scouting The public's regard for Scouting.
The district's use of sound financial procedures. Results viewed two ways People give to
People
Causes
It makes a difference who asks and how Who Gives and Why? FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
DEADLINE--DEADLINE--DEADLINE!! From the very beginning, every leader in a division must be responsible for every person recruited, committing him to attend the orientation, kickoff, and report meetings.
Study carefully all deadlines for recruiting the various groups of sales representatives.
The recruiting schedule must be met. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP Friends of Scouting - Steps for Getting Enough of the Right People to Solicit Cards
Step 1 – The division chairman, with the help of the district executive, needs a list of prospective majors. Call on the most capable people. In selecting prospective majors, look to getting full coverage of area served. Look at team captains who did a good job last year.
Step 2 – The division chairman, with the help of the district executive, compiles a list of prospective captains. Begin with leftover majors. Every division holds a meeting of its majors to orient and train them; then, they should choose the prospective captains to be on their team. Prospective captains list should come from last year's good sales representatives. Note: a major must be trained before they start recruiting their captains. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP
Job description should include:
Title
Campaign Dollar Objective
Specific Duties
Key Dates
Name of Advisor
Job description should be limited to one page. Be honest about what is involved, and use language volunteers can understand. Informing Volunteer Leaders
An important element of recruiting "top" campaign leaders is to clearly inform them of their responsibilities.
When a person is asked to serve in a key position, they should be given a written job description. The person is more likely to accept and perform better if, at the outset, they know what is expected and have pertinent information regarding the position. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE
District steering committee meetings
Recruiting personnel
Personal leadership to keep enrollment on schedule
Detail how the district or Learning for Life executive assumes major assignment
in recording personnel recruited
meeting preparation
working to keep updated records and reports.
7. Prepare and present a one-page job description. When recruiting FOS chair, plan the approach:
1. Discuss the planning meeting.
2. Briefly outline goals.
3. Explain how adequate financial support is essential to goal achievement.
4. Explain district goal and how it is divided for district, community, and family enrollment.
5. Outline the time involved in each of the following:
Council-level meetings of district FOS chairmen FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
VOLUNTEER RECRUITMENT Recruiting the District FOS or Learning for Life Annual Gift Chairman
The first and most important item is recruit this chairman.
The district/division chairman should personally participate in recruiting others as well. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE The degree of any campaign’s success depends upon:
Top leadership
Prospecting and evaluation—determining who has ability an interest to give
The right person making personal solicitation
Campaign controls/ executive direction FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE The first committee meeting should be held in April at a prestigious place.
The committee should meet a minimum of once a month in the fall of the year and once a month from September until campaign completion.
Committee meetings should be action oriented with careful planning. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE Positive leadership is an irreplaceable qualification for each member.
The council enrollment chairman should be selected before the committee’s first meeting.
If the chairman has not been recruited, a major function of the committee is selecting the chairman.
If the proper committee has been selected, the best candidate for chairman is likely to be a member of the committee. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE Active participants could be the council president, vice president–finance, enrollment chairman, and Scout executive.
Other members could be active past presidents and upper-level contributors.
The key to a successful FOS campaign is broad-based, active volunteer involvement. FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE The steering committee is vital to a successful enrollment.
Its primary objective:
ensure campaign success
on-time completion
select campaign leadership.
Qualifications of committee members include:
Key council leaders/top business leaders
Committed to Scouting
Positive attitudes Many families would participate in FOS if approached properly. As it turns out, only 25% of potential contributors are even asked to participate.
Make sure all parents are approached with an effective I-C-5 (“I See Five”) contact on unit presentation.
Family enrollment efforts are vital to Scouting’s future Improved Family Enrollment The steering and prospect and evaluation committee
Review prospects
Determine giving ability
Determine who the right person should be to make the solicitation. Campaigns focus on fewer prospects but for larger gifts.
Councils with 90% of their FOS gifts under $100 have 90% of their gifts over $100.
Councils planning a 5-year turnaround could accomplish their objective in only 3 years.
Possible cultivation strategies are considered Increased Upper-Level Giving Campaigns are organized around the available leader- ship and their influence – not by a rigid structure.
Many councils have had dramatic results using steering committees that are responsible for the campaign success.
These committees meet to:
Determine campaign status
Decide what needs to be done
Recruit required manpower
Make assignments for action prior to the next meeting Trends in Successful
Fund-Raising • Active steering committee
• Increased upper-level giving
• Involvement of top community leadership
• Trying to increase the potential giving (not just business as usual)
On-time goal achievement and victory celebrations
Shorter campaign time Trends in Successful
Fund-Raising Scouting Dollars Scouting Dollars Local Council Staff and services for member-ship growth and quality program.
Outdoor programs and training facilities
Financing comes from support
Friends of Scouting
Sales
Activity Fees
Investment Income
Special funds from
Foundations
Grants
product sales
project sales Financial Resources Youth members Encouraged to pay personal expenses.
Uniform
personal equipment
registration fee
unit dues
camp fees
covers other personal expenses.
Thrift and personal responsibility have always been objectives of the BSA. Financial Resources The youth member
The community
The nation

All provide resources that make Scouting possible. Financial Resources Unit enrollment can include Century members and above.
In our council we’ve found a Century membership is easier to get from family enrollment than by putting parents in the district level campaign. ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —MEMBERSHIP LEVELS Founder member $50,000
Pacesetter member $25,000
Distinguished member $10,000
Benefactor member $ 5,000
Sponsor member $ 2,500
Guardian member $ 1,000
Honor member $ 750
Patron member $ 500
Leadership member $ 250
Century member $ 150 ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —MEMBERSHIP LEVELS People will enroll in levels of membership based on:
a) their ability to participate
b) their interest in Scouting.
A $50 membership is all that some donors can or want to give.
Others will have the interest and ability to enroll for a $5,000 benefactor membership. ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —MEMBERSHIP LEVELS ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —TIMING To maximize chances of success, involve volunteers at the council, district, and unit levels.
A complete organization is developed for each enrollment with calendar, volunteer leadership, and executive direction. ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —TIMING A council’s campaign organization should be tailored to meet the goal.
Use different plans to raise $50, $100, $250, or more.
Other council variables: type, size, and geography.
Use different strategies for metropolitan than for rural areas, for small districts than for large, etc. ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —TIMING The FOS program typically follows a routine timetable.
Campaign momentum and success depends on making the major portion of the goal quickly.
Success in the first part of the council enrollment (the executive board and staff pledges) is a good indicator of how rapidly the council will achieve its goal.
Raising a major portion of the goal early generates great momentum and boosts morale.
The general times for the four phases are:
Council enrollment December-January
District enrollment January
Community enrollment February
Family enrollment Sept/October – Troops
February/March -- Packs ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —KEYS TO SUCCESS Prospect for major gifts
Have precise campaign controls and discipline.
Make a commitment to achieve goals on time.
Analyze giving levels and leadership in preparation for next year’s enrollment.
Plan a victory celebration date prior to the campaign.
Follow the plan. Ninety percent research and preparation
Influential and financially committed Chair-person
Steering committee directs campaign
Prospect and evaluation committee.
Develop a sound plan
Select quality leadership ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? FOS reflects and defines
Council programs
Constituency perception
The annual enrollment program interprets the achievement of the aims and objectives of Scouting to our constituency—thus the “Promise of Scouting” Campaign for 2007 ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? A healthy climate for Scouting begins with good program followed by effective communications.
Annual enrollment is a program of cultivating
individuals served by the council
who support the mission
want involvement in its financial support ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? Authority for the enrollment is found in the Rules and Regulations of the Boy Scouts of America, Article XI, Section 3, Clause 13:

“Sustaining. Persons who desire to be identified with the local council through their financial support and influence in the expansion of the council program may be enrolled as sustaining members of local councils...” ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? A vehicle for growth, providing strength in working together for a common cause
A source of human resources for programs as volunteers become more involved in the council’s needs.
An opportunity for personal commitment THE FRIENDS OF SCOUTING
RESOURCE MANUAL—PART 1 The Friends of Scouting plan is based on proven fund-raising principles.
The plan has evolved from the successful experiences of local councils.
When councils explain dramatic increases in giving, they report, “We just followed the plan.”
The following slides
describe the basic plan
emphasizes developing trends and techniques Apply what you’ve learned!
Travel safely!
Good Scouting! Thanks For Being A Part of This Training Experience Thank you for your help in obtaining the tangible dollar resources that make council and district services available to expand Scouting for your community's youth. Most of America's youth will never know that you are behind their Scouting growth, but you and the leaders of the council will know.

As the chair of the district finance committee, a committee member, or a part of the district's Friends of Scouting campaign, you will help to make Scouting a dynamic success in your community. DISTRICT ENROLLMENT
CALENDAR August
Recruit enrollment personnel in divisions.
Recruit dinner hosts.
September Kick off for these divisions with enrollment dinners as needed:

Benefactor – Patron
Sponsor – Leadership
Guardian – Century DISTRICT ENROLLMENT CALENDAR April-May
District/divisions enrollment chairman recruited.
Chair to info meeting
May-June
Prospect selection and evaluation. ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL CAMPAIGN with the orientation of your steering committee.
Give close attention to the upgrading of giving levels.
Solicit gifts at every meeting. Everyone should be a donor prior to asking others to give.
Keep on schedule.
Don't assume anything. Research and cultivation of prospects occurs all year
90% of successful fundraising is research
Involvement of top community leadership
Place major emphasis on selecting the best available leadership at all levels. Start CLEAN-UP As the campaign nears completion, a concerted effort should be made to make certain that all prospects have been contacted, all pledge cards worked, and monies are turned in. COMMUNICATIONS The District Finance Chairman should regularly communicate campaign progress to the community chairman, captains, and enrollers by mail, phone, fax, E-mail and through report meetings. KICKOFF Campaign Kickoff should be spirited and motivational
Foster a spirit of competition between teams
All volunteers should understand
the importance of concluding the campaign on time
attendance at report meetings
timely communication of working cards in person The local council FOS plan of action with
giving levels
Timetables
leadership structuring
job descriptions
campaign resources. FOS Plan of Action View part 2, Basics of FOS View part 1, Scout Family FOS Time’s Up 0:01 0:02 0:03 0:04 0:05 0:06 0:07 0:09 0:10 0:15 0:20 0:25 0:30 0:35 0:40 0:50 0:55 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 Unit money-earning projects can be planned to serve a dual purpose of conservation and money earning. Collection of aluminum, glass, paper, and scrap metal can be profitable when near a recycling facility. Units should be sure of a market before any collection. A collection must be well planned with adequate adult supervision and safety precautions. Unit Finance Policies No conflict with goods or services offered by established merchants or workmen. Date scheduled not to conflict with established dates of fund-raising in the chartered organization, council, or community.
The name and goodwill of the Boy Scouts of America must be protected and not used as a "front" for commercial interests.
No contract signed by a unit may bind the Boy Scouts of America, either local or national. Unit Finance Policies No direct solicitation for funds by units.
Unit committee is the custodian of funds.
Must submit the Unit Money-Earning Application to the local council
General guidelines for unit money-earning projects include the following:
No gambling, raffles, or conflict with local ordinances.
"Value received for money spent."
Respect territorial rights of other units. Unit Finance Policies Service projects—car wash; forestry projects; collection of paper, aluminum, scrap iron, plastic
Activity involving parents—bake sale, pancake breakfast, spaghetti dinner
Sale of tickets for council show or other events
Sale of commercial product—andy, Christmas trees, first-aid kits, popcorn, light bulbs Unit Finance—Approved Projects Unit Finance Carbon, Emery, Grand, Utah and Washington County
Give support through service
Donors designate gifts to BSA The United Way
Achieve finance goals as approved by the council and district leadership.
Distribute copies of the council and district financial plan. Centennial Quality District Support district activities that involve income and expenses, ensuring proper policy and controls.
Provide recognition to donors, along with information on how their dollars helped serve youth. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members Inform units of unit financing policy and assist in the review and approval of unit requests. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members 9. Support and cultivate a cooperative relationship with the local United Way. Give support through service
Donors can designate gifts to BSA The United Way James E. West 8. Support the council’s endowment development plan. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members Achieve the district’s share of council finance campaigns.
Organize and carry out a successful Friends of Scouting annual campaign, and meet the goal by the targeted date. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members Ensure implement- ation of council finance policies.
Serve as a member of the council finance committee, if so stated in the council bylaws.
Recruit and train a committee to support tasks provided by the council finance committee. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members Turn to page 8 Resources
Friends of Scouting
Resource Manual BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA
Finance Support Division Resources
Annual Campaign Plan Book
Guidelines for Developing a Comprehensive
Council Annual Fund-Raising Strategy BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA
Finance Support Division Why Finance?
Camps
Professional Staff
Training
Activities
Service Center/ Scout Shops The Finance Function Budget Today we are interested in you and not your money. We want to teach you how to handle money for the Utah National Parks Council, Boy Scouts of America. Getting Started Understand tasks of the finance committee
Define district finance goals
Identify ways to organize Friends of Scouting
Establish a district enrollment calendar
Understand where money comes from and where it goes
Understand unit finance, policies and procedures
Become aware of available resources Workshop Objectives Breakout Session
120 minutes The District Finance Committee Part of the District Committee Training Workshop The District Finance Committee Camping and Scouting Unit Success A Challenge: Guns and Firearms
Handguns
Rifles
Shotguns
Muzzle Loaders
Qualified Leadership
NRA/BSA Camp Postal Matches
Sports and Activities
The Sweet 16 of BSA Safety
Cave Exploring
Judo, Tai Chi, and Aikido
BSA Bike Safety Guidelines
Skating Guidelines
Project COPE Health and Safety
Current Guidelines, Procedures, and Policies Aquatics
Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs)
Safe Swim Defense
Safety Afloat
BSA Scuba Policy for Local Councils
BSA Policy on Asthma and Other Pulmonary Diseases as Related to Scuba
Snorkeling, BSA
Swimming Areas
Diving and Elevated Entry
Water Clarity
Waterskiing
Board Sailing
Whitewater Safety Code
Year-Round Aquatics
Cub Scout Aquatics Health and Safety
Current Guidelines, Procedures, and Policies Units make application for long-term camps on or off council sites. Secure tour permits.
Units go winter camping and hold other outdoor events.
Unit makes arrangements for Order of the Arrow elections.
Stress patrols and emphasize the idea of the patrol going to Boy Scout summer camp.
Summer camp plans presented at troop and crew court of honor or parents’ night. ABC of Camp Promotion The Unit’s Job-Winter OA elections planned and information distributed.
Follow up with Venturing crews and Varsity teams on high-adventure promotion and teen camp opportunities. ABC of Camp Promotion
The District’s Job: Winter Recognition of unit leaders doing a good job. ABC of Camp Promotion
The District’s Job: Summer ABC of Camp Promotion
The Council’s Job Review basic camping policy.
Take stock of camping and outdoor record
by unit, year-round; summer;
by percentage and number of packs, troops, teams and crews
by percentage and number of youth members
District follows Council camp promotion plan and secures materials for distribution. The camping committee responsibilities include:
Outdoor program development
Properties and maintenance
Conservation
Promotion Responsibilities of the Council Camping and Outdoor Program Committee We have a challenge to—
Help leaders make the outdoor program an adventurous, exciting, and meaningful opportunity for all youth.
LDS chartered partners make up about 98% of our units
LDS research shows that after their parents, a quality relationship with a youth leader is one of the best predictors of church activity in later life
LDS Scout Leaders spend 52 hours a year in week-day meetings
Varsity and Venturing leaders can double that time with just one three day High Adventure per year The Camping Challenge So every youth will say: “It was all that I hoped for and more”

The key to fulfillment is in the hands of Scouters like yourself.
You can unlock the door to adventure Fulfill the Promise of Scouting:
Fun, Adventure, and Allure of the Outdoors Understand how the District Camping and Outdoor Program Committee
Serves units
How it connects to other district committees
Identify major tasks of the committee
Help units get better outdoor programs
High Adventure promotion
Long term summer camp promotion
Cub Scout outdoor programs promotion
Understand how to work with the Order of the Arrow
Recognize health and safety concerns in outdoor programs Workshop Objectives Be Real—The Project Must Be Real to Youth Members. It must deal with situations that youth can see, that they can understand, or in which they can easily become interested.
Be Clearly Defined—Youth and Their Leaders Must Know What They Are Going to Do.
Know Your Purpose—Youth Must Know Why They Are Doing the Project if they are to learn good citizenship from the project.
Be Democratic—Youth Members Must Be Directly Involved in Selecting, Planning, and Implementing the Project.
Be Informed—Youth Should Be Involved in Gathering Firsthand Information Related to the Project.
Be Action-Oriented—Youth Must Take Some Meaningful Action as a Result of the Project and Be Able to Understand the Results. Teach Citizenship
(See pages 26-27 of the Activities and Civic Service Committee Guide.) Types of events:
Recognition meetings, page 3
How to have an outstanding recognition meeting, pages 4-13
Execution techniques, pages 14-24
Potluck-style dinners, pages 26-32 Recognition Meetings Such a subcommittee is involved only for income-producing activities. You must develop a sales organization on council, district, and unit levels using boys as salesmen. This means printing tickets and sales material; providing incentive to the boys, unit leaders, and district ticket sales committee; setting up a system for accounting for unit returns so they can get their cash commissions; following the progress of unit sales; and encouraging sales through the commissioner staff visits with units. Ticket Sales This subcommittee must clear fire-control measures with the fire department or any other regulatory agency, clear traffic control with police, arrange for parking, run a first aid station, arrange for safety control in all areas, and provide and supervise a service corps to handle crowd control, lost children, and so on. This job requires both clear thinking and an ability to work with authorities on meeting the regulations. The importance of this job cannot be stressed too much. Health and Safety This subcommittee, which might involve an outside group such as a service club or veterans' organization, follows a rating system that is widely publicized to recognize all participating units. Judging and Awards Annual activity during February. Project a good Scouting image.
Rededication ceremonies - Scout parade
Scouter recognition dinner - Uniform Day
Community leadership day - speakers at service clubs
window display contest - religious service in uniform
Boy Scouts of America rally - pilgrimages
shopping center demonstrations - Scout "courtesy" recognitions
report-to-the-community - non-Scouting community programs Scouting Anniversary Week Designed to help boys improve their personal best.
Prepare boys to strive for continual self-improvement.
Events like:
Camporee
Rally
bike rodeo
first aid contest
Klondike derby
advancement hike
field day
swim meet
Special note on competition Competitive Skill Events Four basic categories
competitive skill events
civic service
display events
anniversary celebrations.
The council master plan should
provide for one activity per year in
each of the four that potentially can
involve all units.
In addition there are smaller events
such as
Recognition dinners,
Conferences
Webelos Woods
Eagle Scout dinners Balancing Activities HIGHLIGHTS
FOR THE DISTRICT
ACTIVITIES AND CIVIC
SERVICE COMMITTEE
. . . An Overview Page 4 Highlights
Plans and promotes a well-balanced schedule of district events
Helps Scouting units take part in community service projects. Plan and promote Good Turn for America projects at both a district and unit level.
Promotes and assists with the planning of council events (such as the council show or Eagle Scout dinner).
Promotes and carries out the district's share of national events (such as Scouting Anniversary Week or a national jamboree).
Conducts an annual poll of unit leaders to determine unit needs and interests for district activities Major Tasks of the Committee Did you ever think you could help boys become Eagle Scouts? If you have just joined the district advancement and recognition committee, that is just one of the great contributions you will make.
You will help Cub Scout packs and Boy Scout troops succeed. Packs and troops will help youth members advance in rank. And if they advance in rank, they will have a happy experience in Scouting and will grow because of their Scouting adventure. A Challenge: "Advancement, Eagle Scouts, and You” William T. Hornaday Award
For distinguished service in natural resources conservation
Complete requirements are listed on the various Hornaday Award applications, which can be downloaded from BSA's web site.
Each project should be equivalent in scope to an Eagle Scout leadership service project. A project planned and carried out as an Eagle Project, which would normally qualify for Hornaday Awards MAY BE USED as one of the Hornaday Projects. One of the other projects can be performed on BSA property. District and Council Awards Spirit of the Eagle Award
The guidelines are:
The recipient must be a registered youth member under 21 years of age at the time of his or her death.
The unit committee must submit an application for the award within six months of the youth member's death.
The unit committee must request the approval of the local council.
The Spirit of the Eagle Award application, No. 92-108, is available through local council service centers. District and Council Awards Meritorious Action Awards
Recognition may be given to a BSA youth or adult where the evidence presented to the National Court of Honor, in accordance with prescribed regulations, shows that a significant or outstanding act of service was performed.
The action taken need not involve attempts of rescue or risk to self but must put into practice Scouting skills and/or ideals.
Recognition shall not be given where it appears that the action involved was merely in the performance of duty or the meeting of an obligation. District and Council Awards Lifesaving and meritorious awards
The awards are as follows:
Honor Medal With Crossed Palms may be awarded in exceptional cases to a youth member or adult leader who has demonstrated both unusual heroism and extraordinary skill or resourcefulness in saving or attempting to save human life at extreme risk to self.
Honor Medal may be awarded to a youth member or adult leader who has demonstrated unusual heroism in saving or attempting to save human life at considerable risk to self. District and Council Awards Lifesaving and meritorious awards
In no case shall recognition be given where it appears that the risk involved was merely in the performance of duty, or the meeting of an obligation because of responsibility to supervise and give leadership to the persons whose lives were saved.
It shall be wholly within the discretion of the National Court of Honor to determine from evidence presented which, if any, lifesaving award shall be made. Awards are issued in the name of the Boy Scouts of America. District and Council Awards Lifesaving and meritorious awards
Recognition may be given to a member of the BSA—youth or leader—where the evidence presented to the National Court of Honor, in accordance with prescribed regulations, shows that he or she saved or attempted to save human life under circumstances that indicate heroism and risk to self.
The court will give consideration to resourcefulness and to demonstrated skill in rescue methods. District and Council Awards Silver Beaver Award
These awards shall be made to the recipients by the local council in connection with its annual recognition dinner or other suitable public function.
Each chartered local council shall be entitled to one nomination. Councils having more than 60 traditional units shall be entitled to further nominations on the basis of one for each additional 60 traditional units or fraction thereof in their territory, as of December 31 preceding the nomination, according to the records of the national office. District and Council Awards District Award of Merit
The District/Division Award of Merit is awarded by a District or Exploring Division to volunteer and professional adults for service to youth in the District or Division.
Normally, the award is presented for service to youth in excess of five years.
Candidates for this award must be nominated. Self-nomination disqualifies the candidate. District and Council Awards Have a minimum of 60 percent of youth members advance in rank
Cub Scouting
Boy/Varsity Scouting
earn Venturing recognition awards
or improve by 10 percent over last year. Interpretation of Item #4 Male Venturers with the First Class rank as a Scout in a troop or team may continue working toward the Star, Life, and Eagle Scout ranks up to his 18th birthday.
He must meet the requirements as prescribed in the Boy Scout Handbook and the current Boy Scout Requirements book.
Position of responsibility requirements may be met by the Venturer serving as president, vice president, secretary, or treasurer in his crew, or as boatswain, boatswain's mate, yeoman, purser, or storekeeper in his ship.
The Scoutmaster conference will be conducted by the Advisor or Skipper.
As the Venturer meets the requirements for the Star and Life ranks, a board of review is conducted by the crew or ship committee.
The Eagle board of review follows the procedure established by the local council. Venturing Eagle Scout Award Multiple Credit
Venturers may take multiple credit for requirements, such as using an American Red Cross Emergency Response course for credit in the Ranger first aid requirement and first aid elective, and the Silver first aid requirement.
Venturers may not receive multiple credit when required to do a tabletop display or presentation; one must be done for each requirement that requires one.
Members who are simultaneously members of a Boy Scout troop may receive credit for work toward Boy Scout advancement and Venturing advancement. An example would be a conservation project required in Scouts and in Venturing.
All work on all Venturing advancement must be completed prior to the young person's 21st birthday. Special Considerations It is appropriate to present these awards at
court of honor
Eagle/Silver banquet
Also recognize them in local and school newspapers. Venturing Recognition The Quest Award is based on fitness and sports.
A Venturer must complete five core requirements and at least one of five electives.
There is no review board.
The Sports Bronze Award is the first requirement. Quest Intermediate level requiring at least 12 months' tenure and work.
Requirements are based on three areas:
personal development,
service
leadership.
Gold requires a pre-approved plan of action and a crew review board consisting of youth and adults conducted by the crew president.
It is appropriate to present the award at a court of honor.
Gold is required for Silver. Gold The introduction to specific Venturing skills.
Venturers earn one or more of five Bronze awards:
Arts and Hobbies
Sports
Sea Scouting
Outdoor
Religious Life
One Bronze is required for Gold Bronze Earn the Varsity Scout letter, and complete these requirements:
Be registered as a Varsity Scout
Advance a rank toward Eagle or earn a Palm
Hold a Team leadership position for at least six months
While serving as Team Captain or a Program Manager, act as primary leader on at least two activities.
While serving as a Program Manager or Team Captain, demonstrate shared leadership skills by participating in supportive roles in each of the three remaining three fields of emphasis.
Satisfy the Team Captain that you know and live by the Varsity Scout Pledge
Complete a Board of Review. Denali Award The Eagle Scout service project is an individual matter; therefore, two Eagle Scout candidates may not receive credit for working on the same project.
The variety of service projects performed throughout the nation by Scouts earning their Eagle Award is staggering.
For ideas and opportunities regarding service projects, the Scout can consult people such as school administrators, religious leaders, local government department directors, or a United Way agency's personnel.
The district or council advancement committee also can be helpful by identifying possible projects. The Approval Process After the board of review is completed, the Scoutmaster is informed of all of decisions made by the board of review.
Remember a Scout cannot be recognized until that action is reported to the council through Online Advancement or an Advancement Report.
A monthly report keeps unit records current.
The troop scribe should also keep a record in the Troop/Team Record Book for easy reference. Reporting Advancement The review also reveals the kind of experience he is having, which helps leaders improve the troop for all boys.
The board should attempt to determine the Scout's ideals and goals.
make sure that a good standard of performance has been met.
A discuss the Scout Oath and Scout Law, to make sure the candidate recognizes and understands the value of Scouting in his home, unit, school, and community.
The board of review members should feel free to refer to the Boy Scout Handbook, Scoutmaster Handbook, or any other references during the review. More on Boards of Review Purposes of the Review:
To make sure that the work has been learned and completed.
To check to see what kind of experience the boy is having in his patrol and troop.
To encourage the Scout to advance to the next rank. The review should be conducted at a convenient time and location, such as a meeting, summer camp, or the home of a member of the troop committee. Purposes of a Board of Review Scouts who have completed requirements for a rank prior to their 18th birthday
should submit their application
be reviewed and
recognized within three months after that date.
Boards of review conducted between three and six months after the candidate's 18th birthday must be pre-approved by the local council.
A statement by an adult explaining the reason for the delay must be attached to the Application when it is submitted to the Eagle Scout Service. Scouts 18 or older Scouts
Discuss what our council and districts do to promote Cub Scout advancement. Districts Help Pack Advancement Programs 23 Elective fields with many projects. An arrow point for every 10
first 10 = gold
every 10 after = silver
Requirements/electives found in Wolf Handbook. Earn Bobcat
12 Achievements
approved by parents
leaders approve very few requirements
awarded in Pack Meeting Wolf Requirements Cub Scout Advancement Turn to pages 18–21 of Advancement Committee Policies and Procedures
Review the ranks in Cub Scouting and their requirements. Den and pack program is the basis for the Cub Scout’s advancement.
The steps in Cub Scout and Webelos Scout advancement are
Preparation
Qualification and
Recognition. Cub Scout Advancement The Scout learns in meetings, in activities, and on his own.
The Scout passes badge requirements by demonstrating knowledge.
The Scout is reviewed to discover whether the experience he has had is in line with what the requirements set forth.
- there is no review in Cub Scouting.
The Scout receives the badge to show his achievement. Four parts to advancement: Review Eagle Scout candidate appeals if a unit denies their application or turns them down at the board of review.
Promote the awards and recognition program for Venturing with all crews.
Provide physical facilities and experts in advancement fields that are difficult for units to secure. Major Tasks of the Committee Monitor rank advancements throughout the year and provide assistance to units with little or no advancement.
Coach troop and team leaders in methods for conducting boards of reviews and courts of honor.
Recruit and train an adequate group of merit badge counselors for the district. Major Tasks of the Committee A Challenge
(Satisfaction Plus) Commissioners do this by
Helping leaders increase program quality
Membership inventory in December and at charter renewal Growth from Increasing Tenure/Charter Renewal Commissioner staff leads
Membership committee supports
Tiger Cub to Cub Scout transition
Cub Scout to Webelos Scout transition
Webelos Scout to Boy Scout transition Growth from
Program Transition Four Functions of District Operation Take a Break New units
Recruitment and additional enrollments
Program transitions
Stop dropped units
Increase tenure/more youth reregistered at unit charter renewal Who in the district makes it happen?
List at least 6 things district people do to make it happen.
List at least six things unit/ community organization people do to make it happen. Divide into five buzz groups Four Functions of District Operation District Membership Committee Training Workshop Supervises money-earning activities
guards policy.
Cooperates with council in insurance matters Other Committee Elements Scout
EXPO Gingerbread House Festival
Gingerbread House Festival
Scout Expo has a double purpose
unit program enrichment
source of funds through ticket sales.
District finance volunteers
promote ticket sales
manage ticket sales Special Activities and Events District enrollment.
Community enrollment.
Family enrollment. Friends of Scouting Secure goodwill
keep the public informed about Scouting
Done constantly,
not merely during fund raising times. Who Gives and Why? FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP Key Points in Recruiting/Orienting a Friends of Scouting Chair
Steering committee identifies prospects.
Steering committee identifies members of the recruiting team.
Two volunteers and the district executive recruit--field director is included if the district executive is a new employee.
Two volunteers should be people prospects cannot say no to.
Provide both volunteers with written information on prospect.
Script the recruiting plan – who says what.
You have:
Job description and schedule
Suggested personnel to recruit
Overall organization chart
Other support information depending on experience of prospect:
Information on why BSA has Friends of Scouting
Job description of personnel to recruit FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE Recruit your campaign personnel using proper approach and person
Record recruit on "Personnel Enlistment Report" form.
When recruiting:
Outline the job to be done. Do not under-sell the job
Get acceptance of program, organization, schedule, and goal commitment
Train each enroller
Commit them to see the job through with every prospect worked. Know the number of prospects you plan to solicit and the campaign goals.
Review last year's campaign personnel to select people.
Recruit individual of stature, influence, and means.
Getting the right division chairmen will determine your success or failure.
For 100-150 prospects, get 1 major to recruit 5 captains.
Each Captain recruits 5 workers who will enroll 5 prospects each FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
VOLUNTEER RECRUITMENT Agree upon the best person and, as a team, recruit the membership chairman.
Dual approach
working relationship between the council and district
maintains district or division identity
uses the best people to recruit the best prospects. SAMPLE COMMITTEE MEETING AGENDA

First Steering Committee Meeting
(Should be held in September)
Presiding: _________________________, Enrollment chairman
Attending: Council president, vice president—finance, council finance
committee chairman, council divisions enrollment chairman, district
campaigns chairman, key council finance leaders, Scout executive, and
director of finance
Agenda
I. Introduction and opening remarks Council president
A. Show “Scouting Values” or opening segment of “Fundamental Campaign Methods.”
II. Last year’s report Vice president—finance
A. Review organization structure and amount raised in each division.
B. Distribute campaign analysis by division and districts.
III. This year’s requirements Council president
Discuss how many dollars will be needed and the percent of increase required.
IV. Determine allocation of additional needs to division chairman and districts.
A. Add divisions where needed.
B. Agree upon goals by division and districts.
V. Determine needed leadership and how to recruit. Chairman
VI. Determine plans and committee members to select and evaluate prospects.
VII. Establish calendar Chairman
Confirm key dates including steering committee meeting and victory celebration.
VIII. Closing remarks Council president

NOTE: Agenda items for subsequent meetings should include progress
reports on recruitment, prospect development, evaluations and assignment of
workers, monies in, unrenewed prospects, cleanup plans, and victory
celebration. JOB DESCRIPTION
FOS Campaign Steering Committee Member
Utah National Parks Council
Boy Scouts of America

The Job of the Steering Committee
Objective: Assist in the attainment of the $_______________goal.
Principal Responsibilities
* Select key leadership
* Enroll personally in the upper level of membership
* Actively participate in the prospect and evaluation process
* Accept responsibility in enrolling other upper-level memberships
Throughout the campaign:
1. Analyze status.
2. Determine steps for successful campaign completion.
3. Take necessary action to see that those steps are taken to
ensure successful enrollment.
Calendar
September
Steering committee meeting
Assist in the recruitment of council enrollment chairman if not already
selected, council division chairman, district campaigns chairman
October
Assist in conducting the planning meeting
Help with the upper-level prospects and evaluation meetings
October-April
Attend council steering committee meetings to be held monthly
September-December and twice a month from January until
completion of campaign
Host a leadership dinner
Help with the victory dinner

Staff adviser:
Name:
Title:
Address:
Phone/Contact Info: FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE Every district should have a steering committee.
Every steering committee member should receive a one-page job description when recruited.
There is an example of a job description you can use to create your own (p. 8), as well as a sample of a steering committee meeting agenda (p. 9) see Friends of Scouting Resource Manual FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
THE STEERING COMMITTEE Purposes of the committee meetings:
Review status of the campaign
Determine action items for the next meeting to ensure successful on-time completion
Make assignments Some councils successfully complete campaigns on time by merely scheduling a victory celebration.
This simple act creates great expectations of success.
Councils that campaigned all year (or seldom achieved their goal) found scheduling a victory celebration gave everyone the motivation and enthusiasm needed to make the campaign a success. Victory Celebration Discretionary dollars are expected to increase–the problem is not available money
The challenge is for the council to develop an effective FOS campaign and make a persuasive case statement to potential donors.
More than ever, donors are better informed of their giving potential and options.
Also more than ever, other organizations are very sophisticated in their approaches to fund-raising. Trends in Successful
Fund-Raising National Council The national office adds new programs to meet the needs of youth in a changing era.
A national staff employees skilled administrators and specialists in the total program of Scouting.
Four regional offices provide direct service to 300+ councils.
National costs are paid from membership fees, local council service fees, Supply Group and Magazine Division profits, investments, and special grants from foundations, individuals, and corporations Financial Resources Scouting Units BSA does not operate units
Local organizations charter units from BSA
BSA provides
service
professional staff
Chartered organizations provide
Meeting place
Maintenance and Utilities
Volunteer leadership
Units conduct approved money-earning projects for unit equipment and expenses Financial Resources Build enrollment organization with membership divisions levels.
Council memberships are normally limited to Patron and above.
District memberships usually duplicate council levels, but tend to concentrate on Century to Guardian memberships.
Community membership levels vary. In areas where district enrollment is difficult to organize, memberships frequently include Century members and above ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —MEMBERSHIP LEVELS ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —TIMING Follow the fundamental principles of successful fund-raising and for a winning campaign
People give money to people, especially when they’re asked by those with similar or equal standings.
“Peer pressure” usually leads to substantial gifts ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? To be successful, the annual enrollment must have three elements:
Determining prospective donors’ interest in Scouting
Analyzing prospect’s financial ability to contribute
Determining who is the right person to make the solicitation ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? 84 % of philanthropic gifts come from individuals
75 % from living donors
9 % through bequests
Scouting builds constituency by influencing people who willingly support us on a continuing basis.
Scouting directly influences families of youth, but can be expanded by cultivating those exposed in different ways. Including:
Relatives – Volunteers
Community leaders – Scouting alumni
Members of chartered organizations ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL FOS
CAMPAIGN —WHAT IS THE PLAN? Councils use the program to build constituency
Friends of Scouting is the largest source of income
A well-developed FOS program offers benefits beyond the income, including:
An awareness and understanding for council programs
A broad base for support of program resources
New prospects as well as current donors
A measure of independence in program and operation
An annual opportunity to tell the council’s story
An opportunity for a donor to gain personal satisfaction DISTRICT ENROLLMENT CALENDAR July-August.
Recruit the following:
Benefactor chairman $5,000
Sponsor chairman $2,500
Guardian chairman $1,000
Patron chairman $500
Leadership chairman $250
Century chairman $150
Prepare prospects lists in the order listed (chairman, district executive, and others assist) REPORT MEETINGS Scheduled Council report meetings are a key part of the campaign.
District Report meetings should be scheduled monthly (or more frequently) to take advantage of the council report meeting “momentum.” THE CAMPAIGN PROCESS enrollers to ensure a successful campaign. Ask for their prospect lists as soon as possible.
Step 4 Conduct an effective campaign kickoff
Step 5 Send out weekly reminders to everyone involved in the campaign.
Step 6 Conduct campaign report meetings as needed.
Step 7 Hold a victory celebration when the campaign has been completed. Step 1 The District Campaign Chairman must recruit the Community Chairman (where needed) and captains (one captain per 25 prospects). The chairman outlines the duties of the community chairman and captains. Invitations to the orientation meeting are sent to all prospects
Step 2 Assist the community chairman/captains in the recruitment of enrollers.
Step 3 Work with captains and The two suggested organization charts will serve as a guide depending on the size of the campaign. District Friends of Scouting Organization 0:08 0:45 The district has responsib- ility to guide units in unit finance practices.
Divide into three groups.
Group 1: List the various expense items that a Scouting unit might have.
Group 2: List a variety of authorized unit fund-raising projects.
Group 3: List nine unit finance policies and guidelines of the BSA.
Allow groups 10 minutes.
Have each group report its results. Unit Finance COUNCIL FINANCE COMMITTEE Endowment Product Sales Unit money-earning
and Policy Project Sales Friends of Scouting District Executive Program Committee Membership Committee FINANCE
COMMITTEE DISTRICT CHAIR District Commissioner COUNCIL VICE PRESIDENT
OF DISTRICT OPERATIONS District Finance Committee Learning for Life Health and Safety Publicity Advancement Activities and Civic Service Outdoor Promotion Training District Executive Program Committee Finance Committee Membership Committee District Chair District Commissioner DISTRICT Report to the district chairman for your district. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members Financial Statement Silver Beaver Award
Presented by councils annually
The council president appoints a Silver Beaver Award committee that will consider candidates and make recommendations.
Nominations cannot be made for posthumous awards.
The award is limited to adults 21 years of age or older.
The requirements and procedures are as follows:
This award may be made each year upon the nomination of chartered local councils.
These nominations shall be submitted not fewer than 30 days in advance of the date upon which it is desired to present the awards. District and Council Awards As a Varsity Scout or Scouter participate actively in all phases of the Varsity program to receive the Varsity Letter. The requirements are:
Be a registered Varsity Scout team member.
While a team member, actively participate in or accomplish at least one high-adventure/sports pin to the satisfaction of the Varsity Scout Coach.
Have an attendance record at team meetings and activities of at least 75 percent for three consecutive months.
Satisfy the Varsity Scout Coach that you know and live by the Scout Oath and Law.
After you complete each Varsity Sport season or high-adventure program, you are eligible to wear an activity pin attached to your letter that represents your completion of that activity. You may also wear a gold bar on the letter to represent each additional letter you have earned. Varsity Scout Letter Events Unit Organization District Executive Program Committee Finance Committee Membership Committee District Chair District Commissioner DISTRICT Pack Organizer
Troop Organizer
Team Organizer
Crew Organizer Relationships Conferences
Together Plan
Round-ups
Unit to Unit Transition District Membership Committee FOS RESOURCE MANUAL
EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP Friends of Scouting - Steps for Getting Enough of the Right People to Solicit Cards
Step 3 – The chairman, district executive and majors, compile a list of prospective campaigners. Begin with leftover names from captains. Every division of your campaign should hold a meeting of its captains to get them oriented and trained. Those captains choose prospective sales representatives they will invite to serve on their team. The list should come from last year's workers, parents, and Friends of Scouting. Note: A captain must be trained before they start recruiting campaigners.
Step 4 – Staff member and division chairman will maintain a master list of prospective majors, captains, and campaigners and who they are assigned to. If additional names are needed, the volunteer can contact either the staff member or chairman for more prospects. 7. Support the council “project selling” program. Major Tasks of the Finance Committee Chairman and Members 11. Supervise off council permits and inspections
Help maintain and develop quality outdoor facilities

Promote National Camping Awards Major Tasks of the Committee
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