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Poetry: Sonnets

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by

Randi Brady

on 6 January 2016

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Transcript of Poetry: Sonnets

Poetic Devices Madness
Rhyme
METER
The Sonnet
Italian Sonnet
Spenserian Sonnet
Shakespearian Sonnet
The Volta
End Rhyme:
Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.
-The rhythm of a poem, using stressed and
unstressed syllables.
-We mark stressed syllables with slashes and unstressed syllables with u's.

-Iambic Pentameter:
A specific type of meter.

"But soft! What light through yonder window breaks?
A very, very old form of poetry!
We'll discuss three different types of sonnets.

ALL sonnets have 14 lines.
The differences lie in rhyme scheme.
the sonnet-ballad
by Gwendolyn Brooks

Oh mother, mother, where is happiness?
They took my lover's tallness off to war,
Left me lamenting. Now I cannot guess
What I can use an empty heart-cup for.
He won't be coming back here any more.
Some day the war will end, but, oh, I knew
When he went walking grandly out that door
That my sweet love would have to be untrue.
Would have to be untrue. Would have to court
Coquettish death, whose impudent and strange
Possessive arms and beauty (of a sort)
Can make a hard man hesitate--and change.
And he will be the one to stammer, "Yes."
Oh mother, mother, where is happiness?

XLIII. "How do I love thee? Let me count the ways..."
by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday's
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with a passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints, --- I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life! --- and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.


Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate;
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date;
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
The "turning point" of the sonnet.
Internal Rhyme:
Rhyming words appear within the same line.
Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary
Slant Rhyme: The repetition of
words that sound similar, but
do not rhyme exactly.
-said and paid
-soul and all
-grove and love
Yes, these count. I would never lie to you.
About poetry.
Rhyme Scheme: The pattern of rhyming
words in a poem. Use letters to label.
PRACTICE!
I wondered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze

Would you like them
Here or there?

I would not like them
here or there.
I would not like them
anywhere.
I do not like
green eggs and ham.
I do not like them,
Sam-I-am
Full transcript