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The twelve steps of the Hero's Journey are:

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Jack Webster

on 18 October 2013

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Transcript of The twelve steps of the Hero's Journey are:

The Odyssey final project
The Odyssey final project
the 12 steps of the hero's journey
The twelve steps of the Hero's Journey are:
The Ordinary World
The Call to Adventure
The Refusal of the Call
Meeting the Mentor
Crossing the Threshold
Tests, Allies, and Enemies
The Approach to the Inmost Cave
The Ordeal
The Reward
The Road Block
Resurrection
Return with Elixir
Archtypes
The seven archtypes are:
1. Hero
2. Mentor
3. Threshold Guardian
4. Herald
5. Shapeshifter
6. Shadow
7. Trickster

We believe that Odysseus' call to action was when the gods decided that he had suffered enough and that he should be allowed to begin the journey home.
Step 2: The Call to Adventure
We thought that Odysseus' refusal of the call was when we was going to let himself drown after Poseidon sunk his raft while he was leaving Calypso's island.
Step 3: The Refusal of the Call
by: Jack Webster and Kaylaa Velazquez
In the case of Odysseus in the "Odyssey", our hero's ordinary world is living on the island of Ogyia, retained by the goddess Calypso, who ever tries to win over his heart, and never does.
Step 1: The Ordinary World
"After saying this, Odysseus began to count the lovely tripods, cauldrons, gold, and splendid clothing. It was all there. Then, overwhelmed with longing for his native land, he wandered on the shore beside the crashing sea, with many cries of sorrow. Then Athena came, moving close to him in the form of a young man, someone who herded sheep, but with a refined air that marks the sons of kings. She wore a well-made cloak, a double fold across her shoulders, and sandals on her shining feet. In her hand she gripped a spear. Odysseus, happy to catch sight of her, came up and spoke to her—his words had wings"
(Homer Book 13 page 230 line 262-274)
Step 4: Meeting the Mentor
Odysseus's mentor is Athena, she encourages him in all his battles and ordeals and helps him when he is in need of it.
"The other warriors, all those who had escaped being utterly destroyed, were now back safely home, facing no more dangers from battle or the sea. But Odysseus, who longed to get back to his wife and reach his home, was being held in a hollow cave by that mighty nymph Calypso, noble goddess, who wished to make Odysseus her husband. But as the seasons came and went, the year arrived 20 in which, according to what gods had once ordained, he was to get back to Ithaca, his home— not that he would be free from troubles even there, among his family. The gods pitied Odysseus, all except Poseidon, who kept up his anger against godlike Odysseus and did not relent until he reached his native land."
(Homer book 1 page 8-9 line 13-27)
“He says that you have here with you a man more unfortunate than all the other ones who fought nine years round Priam's city, which in the tenth year they destroyed and left to get back home. But on that voyage back they sinned against Athena, and she sent tall waves and dangerous winds against them. All his other noble comrades perished, but winds and waves still carried him ahead and brought him here. Now Zeus is ordering you to send him off as soon as possible. For it is not ordained that he will die far from his friends. Instead his fate decrees he'll see his family and still make it home to his high-roofed house and native land.”
(Homer book 5 page 100 line 129-143)
"My sheer destruction is now beyond all doubt. O those Danaans, three and four times blessed, who died back then in spacious Troy, while doing a favour for the sons of Atreus! How I wish I'd died as well and met my Fate that day when companies of Trojans hurled at me their bronze-tipped spears, in the fighting there around the corpse of Peleus's dead son. Then I'd have had my funeral rites, and Achaeans would've made me famous. But now I'm fated to be overwhelmed and die a pitiful death.”
(Homer book 5 page 108 line 375-387)
“With these words, lord Odysseus crept out from the thicket. With his strong hands, he broke off from thick bushes a leafy branch to hold across his body and conceal his sexual organs. He emerged, moving just like a mountain lion which relies on its own strength— though hammered by the rain and wind, it creeps ahead, its two eyes burning, coming in among the herd of sheep or cattle, or stalking a wild deer—his belly tells him to move in against the flocks, even within a well-built farm. That how Odysseus was coming out to meet those fair-haired girls, although he was stark naked. He was in great distress, but, caked with brine, he was a fearful sight to them, and they ran off in fear and crouched down here and there among the jutting dunes of sand. The only one to stand her ground was Alcinous' daughter. For Athena had put courage in her heart and taken from her arms and legs all sense of fear.”
(Homer book 6 page 119-120 line 158-175)
Odysseus crossed his threshold when he over came his refusal of the call with the help of Athena, and washed up on the shore and is found by Nausicaa.
Step 5: Crossing the Threshold
“Meanwhile, Odysseus, asleep in his own land, woke up. He didn't recognize just where he was. He'd been away so long, and Pallas Athena, Zeus' daughter, had shed a mist around him, 230 to make him hard for people to identify, so she could tell him everything, while his wife, his townsfolk, and his friends would not know who he was, until the suitors' crimes had all been paid in full. And so all things seemed unfamiliar to their king, the long straight paths, the harbour with safe anchorage, the sheer-faced cliffs, the trees in rich full bloom. So he jumped up and looked out at his native land.”
(Homer Book 13 page 259 line 227-238)
Odysseus's approach to the inmost cave was when he arrived at his homeland Ithica, after years of trying to return home.
“When the suitors saw Antinous fall, they raised an uproar in the house, leaping from their seats, scurrying in panic through the hall, looking round everywhere along the well-constructed walls, but there were no weapons anywhere, no strong spear or shield for them to seize. They began to shout, yelling words of anger at Odysseus: “Stranger, you'll pay for shooting arrows at this man. For you there'll be no contests any more. It's certain you'll be killed once and for all. You've killed a man, by far the finest youth in all of Ithaca. And now the vultures are going to eat you up right here.” Each of them shouted out some words like these. They did not think he'd killed the man on purpose. In their foolishness, they didn't realize they'd all become enmeshed in destruction's snare. Shrewd Odysseus scowled at them and gave his answer: “You dogs, because you thought I'd not come back from Troy to my own home, you've been ravaging my house, raping women, and in your devious way wooing my wife, while I was still alive, with no fear of the gods, who hold wide heaven, or of any man who might take his revenge in days to come. And now a fatal net has caught you all.”
(Homer book 22 page 430 line 25-49)
The ordeal that Odysseus has to go through is the killing of the suitors that invaded his home, stole his riches and attempted to steel his wife and family.
Step 8: The Ordeal
Ally-Athena
Enemy- cyclopes
Test-Odysseus and his men being held by Circe
Step 7: The Approach to the Inmost Cave
Step 6: Tests, Allies, and Enemies
Enemy-Cyclops
The Cyclops were one of Odysseus' most fearful enemies and were very important to the plot of the story
Test- Trapped by Circe
Odysseus and his men were held captive by Circe, but were able to escape with the help of the gods.
“Where are you off to now, you poor man, going through these hills all by yourself and knowing nothing of the country here? Your comrades, over there in Circe’s house, are penned up like swine in narrow stalls. Are you intending now to set them free?”
(Homer book 10 page 197 line 367-372)
Ally- Athena
Throughout the entire epic Athena is Odysseus' most important and most helpful ally.
“As he debated in his mind and heart like this, a huge wave carried him toward the rocky shore. His skin would have been stripped and all his bones smashed up, but the goddess with the gleaming eyes, Athena, put a thought inside his mind. As he surged ahead, he grabbed a rock with both his hands and held on, groaning, until that giant wave had passed him by.”
(Homer book 5 page 112 line 518-524)
“That's what I said. But his ruthless heart gave me no reply. Instead, he jumped up, seized two of my companions in his fist, and smashed them on the ground like puppy dogs. Their brains oozed out and soaked the ground below. He tore their limbs apart to make a meal, and chewed them up just like a mountain lion— innards, flesh, and marrow—leaving nothing. We raised our hands to Zeus and cried aloud, to witness the horrific things he did, our hearts unable to do anything. Once Cyclops had stuffed his massive stomach with human flesh and washed it down with milk, he lay down in the cave, stretched out there among his flocks.”
(Book 9, line 379-393, page 174)
“Penelope spoke and stirred in him an even more intense desire to weep. As he held his loyal and loving wife, he cried. Just as it's a welcome sight for swimmers when land appears, men whose well-constructed ship Poseidon has demolished on the sea, as winds and surging waves were driving it, and a few men have swum to shore, escaping the grey sea, their bodies thickly caked with brine, and they climb gladly up on land, evading that disaster, that how Penelope rejoiced to see her husband. She simply couldn't stop her white arms holding him around the neck.”
(Homer book 23 Page 458 line 229-311)
“But come now, tell me about the women in these halls, the ones who disrespect me and the ones His dear nurse Eurycleia “All right my child, I'll tell you the truth. In these halls of yours, there are fifty female servants, women we have taught to carry out their work, to comb out wool and bear their slavery. Of these, twelve in all have gone along without a sense of shame and no respect for me or even for Penelope herself. Telemachus has only just grown up, and his mother hasn't let him yet control our female servants. But come, let's go now to that bright upstairs room and tell your wife.”
(Homer book 22 page 445 line 516-532)
Odysseus, too, looked round the house to check if anyone was hiding there, still alive, trying to escape his own dark fate. But every man he looked at—and there were plenty—had fallen in blood and dust, like fish which, in the meshes of a net, fishermen have pulled from the gray sea up on the curving beach, lying piled up on the sand, longing for sea waves, while the bright sun takes away their life—that's how the suitors then were lying in heaps on one another.
(Homer book 22 page 443 line 475-484)
“They came out holding torches, then gathered round Odysseus, embracing him. They clasped and kissed his head, his hands, and shoulders, in loving welcome. A sweet longing seized him to sigh and weep, for in his heart he knew them all.”
(Homer book 22 page 448 line 611-615)
Archetype 1: Hero
The reward that Odysseus gets after his journey is his beloved wife Penelope.
Step 9: The Reward
Odysseus is told about how some of his servants have betrayed him and all he has to do to complete his journey is kill them.
Step 10: The Road Back
Odysseus looks around for any wooers who might have survived and when he doesn't find any he realizes that he is able to resume his old life
Step 11:Resurrection
The maids and the women in Odysseus' household embrace him, welcoming him home.
Step 12: Return with Elixir
We thought that the hero in the Odyssey was Odysseus because he fought to preserve the world he knew.
“Muse, speak to me now of that resourceful man who wandered far and wide after ravaging
the sacred citadel of Troy. He came to see many people's cities, where he learned their customs, while on the sea his spirit suffered many torments, as he fought to save his life and lead his comrades home. But though he wanted to, he could not rescue them— they all died from their own stupidity, the fools. They feasted on the cattle of Hyperion, god of the sun—that's why he snatched away their chance of getting home someday.”
(Homer book 1 page 8 line 1-11)
Archetype 2: Mentor
The Mentor of Odysseus is Athena, she encourages and supports him along his journey in so many ways.
Archetype 4: Herald
The herald in the Odyssey was Circe, because she warned Odysseus about the dangerous that he would face later on in his journey.
Archetype 7: Trickster
In the Odyssey the trickster are the Sirens, because they distract the hero from his/her journey but don't completely throw the hero off.
Archetype 5: Shapeshifter
In the Odyssey the shapeshifters are the lotus eaters, because they device Odysseus' crew making them think that they are safe but in reality they were being trapped.
Archetype 3: Threshold Guardian
The threshold guardian for Odysseus is Polyphemus, the cyclops, who tests Odysseus's wits to get out of the cave alive.
“After saying this, Odysseus began to count the lovely tripods, cauldrons, gold, and splendid clothing. It was all there. Then, overwhelmed with longing for his native land, he wandered on the shore beside the crashing sea, with many cries of sorrow. Then Athena came, moving close to him in the form of a young man, someone who herded sheep, but with a refined air that marks the sons of kings. She wore a well-made cloak, a double fold across her shoulders, and sandals on her shining feet. In her hand she gripped a spear.Odysseus, happy to catch sight of her, came up and spoke to her—his words had wings”
(Homer book 13 page 260 line 262-274)
“The crew drew lots and picked the very men would have chosen for myself, four of them, with me included as fifth man in the group. In the evening he came back, leading on his fine-skinned animals and bringing them inside the spacious cave, every sheep and goat in his rich flock—not leaving even one out in the open courtyard. Perhaps he had a sense of something wrong, or else a god had given him an order. He picked up and put his huge rock door in place, then sat to milk each ewe and bleating goat, one by one, setting beside each mother one of her young. When this task was over, he quickly seized two men and wolfed them down.”
(Homer book 9 page 176 line 441-455)
"No human being could climb up that rock and stand on top, not even if he had twenty hands and feet. The cliff's too smooth, like polished stone. Half way up the rock face there's a shadowy cave. It faces west, 100 towards Erebus. You'll steer your ship at it, illustrious Odysseus. There's no man powerful enough to shoot an arrow from a hollow ship and reach that cavern. In there lives Scylla. She has a dreadful yelp. It's true her voice sounds like a new-born pup, but she's a vicious monster. Nobody would feel good seeing her, nor would a god who crossed her path. She has a dozen feet,"
(homer book 12 page 237 line 96-109)
Archetype 6: Shadow
In The Odyssey the shadow is Poseidon because he does everything in his power to stop Odysseus from reaching his homeland.
“Nine days fierce winds drove me away from there, across the fish-filled seas, and on the tenth we landed where the Lotus-eaters live, people who feed upon its flowering fruit. We went ashore and carried water back. Then my companions quickly had a meal by our swift ships. We had our food and drink, and then I sent some of my comrades out to learn about the men who ate the food the land grew there. I chose two of my men and with them sent a third as messenger. They left at once and met the Lotus-eaters, who had no thought of killing my companions, but gave them lotus plants to eat, whose fruit, sweet as honey, made any man who sampled it lose his desire to ever journey home or bring back word to us—they wished to stay, to remain among the Lotus-eaters, feeding on the plant, eager to forget about their homeward voyage.”
(homer book 9 page 167 line 108-127)
“Hear me, Poseidon, Enfolder of the Earth, dark-haired god, if I truly am your son and if you claim to be my father, grant that Odysseus, sacker of cities, a man from Ithaca, Laertes' son, never gets back home. If it's his destiny 700 to see his friends and reach his native land and well-built house, may he get back late and in distress, after all his comrades have been killed, and in someone else's ship. And may he find troubles in his house.”
(Homer book 9 page 183 line 695-705)

“Once I'd plugged my comrades' ears with wax, they tied me hand and foot onto the ship, so I stood upright hard against the mast. They lashed the rope ends to the mast as well, then sat and struck the gray sea with their oars. But when we were about as far away as a man can shout, moving forward quickly,our swift ship did not get past the Sirens, once it came in close, without being noticed.So they began their clear-toned cry”
(Homer book 12 page 240 line 226-235)
Bibliography
Steps of the Hero's journey

1. Clipartheaven. "Palm_tree_island_2 Clipart Clip Art." Palm_tree_island_2 Clipart. Clipartheaven, n.d. Web. 18 Oct. 2013.

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Archtypes

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Picture of Odysseus http://foothilltech.org/rgeib/english/odyssey/letter-assignment/odysseus/
Goddess with the gleaming eyes Athena http://camphalfblood.wikia.com/wiki/File:Athena.jpg
Polyphemus the Cyclops
http://www.ickids.org.uk/hugo/greeks/odyssey/od4.htm
Circe
http://cemac.deviantart.com/art/Circe-124228683
Odysseus's men watching the Lotus-Eaters http://warriorsofmyth.wikia.com/wiki/Lotus-Eater
World-shaker Poseidon http://icecold555.deviantart.com/art/Poseidon-296887836
A mythical siren http://www.fanpop.com/clubs/mermaids/images/25084952/title/siren-photo
"The 3am Teacher: Techno Tuesday Tips Linky & Bear Craftivity Freebie." The 3am Teacher: Techno Tuesday Tips Linky & Bear Craftivity Freebie. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Oct. 2013.
"Smscs." River Images Clipart. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Oct. 2013.
"Category Archives: ATHENA." ImaginePittsburgh Now. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Oct. 2013.
"Hoplite Tactics." Hoplite Tactics. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Oct. 2013.
"Odysseus Killing the Suitors, G. Schwab." Odysseus Killing the Suitors, G. Schwab. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Oct. 2013.
"B2B Internet SolutionsQuick Colorado Dot Com." B2B Internet Solutions RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Oct. 2013.
"Road Trip." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 13 Oct. 2013. Web. 18 Oct. 2013.
"Heroes Through the Ages." : A Hero's Journey: Batman vs. Ulysses. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Oct. 2013.
"A Primer on Greek Mythology: Part IV – The Odyssey and Applying What We've Learned." The Art of Manliness RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Oct. 2013.
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