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Tikanga a-iwi

Year 9 Social Studies: Cultural Interaction
by

John-Paul Powley

on 4 April 2018

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Transcript of Tikanga a-iwi

Who comes to East?
NZ European/Pakeha - 47%
Maori - 14.5%
Samoan - 7%
Chinese - 7%
Indian - 5.5%
South-East Asia - 4.7%
Other European - 3.7%
Other Pacific People - 2.5%
African - 2%
Middle-Eastern - 1.7%
Other Asian - 1.7%
Cook Island Maori - 1.4%

What is sometimes in your lunchbox that you...
love
hate
have ever been embarrassed by?
If you wanted to get this haircut would it be ok? With EVERYONE in your extended family?

Why/Why not?
Wellington East Girls' College is a multi-cultural school. What does multi-cultural mean?
Let's think about words like "normal" or "weird" when you're talking with people who are different from you. For example:
Mahi:

Open up your exercise book and leave a page
On the next page write: tikanga ā-iwi / cultural interaction
Answer this question:
What is tikanga ā-iwi / cultural interaction?
Draw a table like this on the rest of the page:
Korerorero:
When you see the task go and ask THREE people those questions
Write down what they say
When people come to your house what do they do with their shoes when they come inside? How come?
What's a better word than normal when you're talking about a multi-cultural society? How could we improve the sentence: "It's normal to speak English in NZ"?
The whakatauki for the unit is "he waka eke noa" which means "we're all in this together". Do you agree with this? Why/Why not?
From now on you will take turns bringing whakatauki to class to share lesson by lesson.
I love eating chicken feet!
Oh! That's weird. Why don't you like normal food?
Kaupapa
- To understand what tikanga ā-iwi is

Tika
- I have:
completed a series of interviews and take notes
thought about how I am different and similar to people in my class
begun a title page
Things that were the same as me
Things that were different from me
Questions
Look at your notes and fill in as many points as you can in each column
Highlight or underline the most surprising similarity and difference, and your burning question
Share with the class
Kaupapa
- To know why we study tikanga ā-iwi

Tika
- I will:
answer a set of questions about who comes to East
write about being a minority
explain a pie chart about who lives in New Zealand
make an image that shows what you bring to East
Aro
Task
Put the information in order from the biggest group to the smallest group
Finish these sentences:
The largest group at East is...
The largest four groups at East are...
The smallest three groups at East are...
Some groups that could be added together are... and... because....
Task
Put the information in order from the biggest group to the smallest group
Can you see any groups that could be grouped together? Create a new list showing these combined groupings and their new %
What might be a problem with lumping different groups together like this?
Task
Put the information in order from the biggest group to the smallest group
Write three generalisations about this data (a generalisation is a statement that is mostly true)
What are the potential benefits and challenges for the school of having this diversity?
Who comes to East?
Other Asian - 1.7%
Other Pacific People - 2.5%
Maori - 14.5%
Cook Island Maori - 1.4%
Chinese - 7%
Middle-Eastern - 1.7%
Indian - 5.5%
NZ European/Pakeha - 47%
South-East Asia - 4.7%
Samoan - 7%
Other European - 3.7%
African - 2%

In 2016, 1015 students came to East. Who were they?
Tikanga a-iwi
-
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-
-
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Even though one group is bigger than all of the others, the others added together are bigger than that group.

Thoughts
All of us have known what it is like to be a minority. It can be as simple as being in a group of people where everyone hates a musician you really love.
Mahi
Write about a time you have really felt like the odd one out. Explain the situation, and then explain your feelings.
What is a census?

The NZ data is similar to East because...

The NZ data is different to East because...
Who lives in Aotearoa?
Tukunga Iho / Impacts
We can see that many different cultures come to East, and that many different cultures live in New Zealand.
In the world recently we have seen an increase in racism, intolerance and xenophobia.* Look at these images. What are they about? Where are they from? Who do they target? Why?
*you know what phobia is... what is xeno?
At East, of course, we do not stand for hate.
We're East = Wellington East = WE.
What do you bring to East that makes us richer?
Mahi
Add one slide to the Google slide show that has been shared with the class. On that slide you should show what you believe you bring to East.
Kaupapa
- To be able to explain the key concepts in this topic

Tika
- I will:
create a list of the key words in this topic
use these words to think about how two cultures interact at East
Mahi
In your book write the title: Key Concept Words
Underneath the title draw this:
Concept Word
Custom - Tikanga
Beliefs - Whakapono
Language - Reo
Culture - Tikanga ā-iwi
Society - Pohanga
Challenge - Wero
Opportunity - āhei
Minority
Majority
Brainstorm
List any words you connect with the words on the left
Mahi
Come up and add words from your list to the whiteboard list of concept words. The teacher will underline the words that are really important.
Copy a new list in your book and just add the underlined words on the whiteboard to the right hand column.
Copy a new list in your book. Look at the underlined words on the whiteboard, and then write a definition using all/some of those words.
Here's how we have organised all those words into a diagram. Let's try and use the diagram with some examples.
Other Asian - 1.7%
Other Pacific People - 2.5%
Maori - 14.5%
Cook Island Maori - 1.4%
Chinese - 7%
Middle-Eastern - 1.7%
Indian - 5.5%
NZ European/Pakeha - 47%
South-East Asia - 4.7%
Samoan - 7%
Other European - 3.7%
African - 2%

Task
Answer these questions:
What is a Maori
custom
when you meet someone?
What is a Pakeha
custom
when you meet someone?
If an American tourist visited a marae what could be a
challenge
for that tourist when they met the tangata whenua?
What could be an
opportunity
for that manuhiri?
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Answer this question with as many examples as you can think of:
What could be the
challenges
and
opportunities
for a foreign tourist being welcomed onto a marae for the first time in their life?
Look back at the first image in this topic. It is a painting of a British man meeting a Maori man. Using the Maori words, what are wero and ahei from this first meeting?
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http://www.assessmentforlearning.edu.au/professional_learning/learning_intentions/learning_examples_intentions.html
Teacher's Page
Tikanga a-iwi
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A/O:
Understand how cultural interaction impacts on cultures, societies, and individuals.
Concepts:
cultural interaction, culture, minority, majority, society, beliefs, customs, language, challenges, opportunities
Key Understanding:
Cultural interaction presents opportunities and challenges for cultures, societies and individuals.
Social Inquiry Skill:
Finding Information
Kaupapa
- To understand the challenges and opportunities that many minority groups face in Aotearoa
Tika
- I will:
complete worksheets showing challenges and opportunities
culture
Aotearoa
customs
society
Dr. Eboo Patel
Diversity is not just the differences you like; diversity is the differences you don’t like.
a [healthy] society [is one] in which people... can disagree on some fundamental things and work together on other fundamental things.
Teacher Info: Please select 2-3 Both Worlds stories for your class based on your class needs/interests - use the index in the drive to help.
Kaupapa
- To understand the difference between surface and deep culture
Tika-

I will:
think about the difference between deep and surface culture
write about those differences and present them to the class
Kaupapa
- To be able to find quality information
Your teacher will share with you a slide show about the skill of Finding Information. This is one of the core skills in Social Studies, and is what your assessment will be based on.
he waka eke noa
Everyone I talked to...
One person I spoke to...
Why do some people...
Mahi:

Go back to the page you skipped - this is a title page
Your title page must have two things:
The words: tikanga-a-iwi / cultural interaction
Examples of cultural interaction
You will be marked on this:
Kākano
(seed) - I have used the words and tried to give an example of tikanga-a-iwi
Tipu
(grow) - I have used the words and have one or two good examples of tikanga-a-iwi
Puāwai
(blossom) - I have used the words and have multiple examples of tikanga-a-iwi
Kākano
(seed)
Tipu
(grow)
Puāwai
(blossom)
he waka eke noa
Aro
Explain your whakataukī to the class and add it to the wall.

How does it fit with the idea of tikanga-a-iwi and he waka eke noa?
THINGS ANYONE CAN SEE/HEAR/TASTE
THINGS YOU CAN'T SEE
Food, clothes, language, flags, festivals, arts, dance
Attitudes to: elders, family, work, women, guests
Approaches to: marriage, dating, raising children, religion
Ideas about: good manners, cleanliness, beauty, animals
Tikanga-a-iwi
the way of people
Different groups of people have different ways of being. What happens when two groups with different ways meet? Where do these differences come from? Can we get along? These are all questions for this unit and you may have been able to see some differences and similarities in the last task.
For this task you will need a blank piece of paper (not in your book) that you will be able to hand in.
Most cultures have at least one big celebration in the year where the family gets together and shares a special meal. In a place like Aotearoa this is Christmas Day for many people.

Think about your special day (Christmas, or another day like Eid). On your piece of paper draw what the main meal of that day looks like. What food is there? Who is there? What are they wearing, and where are they sitting? Is their music? Do people say anything special? Are there games or rituals (Christmas crackers)?

When you have done this you will talk with other people in the class about your special day, and learn about differences and similarities.

Kākano
Tipu
(or)
Kākano
Tipu
(or)
Joseph Banks bartering with a Māori for a lobster. Watercolour and pencil by Tupaia, 1769.
Aro
1. Explain your whakataukī to the class and add it to the wall.

How does it fit with the idea of tikanga ā-iwi and he waka eke noa?

2. What does Dr Patel mean in these two quotes? Is he right? Why?
This lesson asks you to think about differences that can be more challenging than food you don't like the look of.
This is called the culture iceberg. What you can see of culture is really small compared to what you cannot see. What you cannot see is really powerful because it shapes what we think normal or good is. If someone does something that our culture thinks is "bad" it is very hard not to think that person and culture is bad.

If you are a small group in a bigger society, a sub-culture, then you might find the bigger society trying to change you or, worse, punish and imprison you.
Here are a set of cultural beliefs:
"People should be able to date and find someone they love of either gender. They can have a few partners, maybe move in together before they get married. They might even have children and never marry and that's ok. Either partner might work, or they both might work, and the child will go to daycare."
You might read that and think: "yep, that's normal." It isn't though. Other people in this class are thinking: "that will never happen." It's not normal, it is what one culture thinks is acceptable behaviour at the moment (it didn't 50 years ago).
Mahi
We're going to read the story of Witarina Harris now. She is a Māori woman talking about moving to Te Whanganui-a-Tara and getting married in the 1930s. When we read it we want to think about the surface and deep parts of the culture that it shows.
I said, “I’m staying in a Pākehā house; very kind people, but they’re Pākehā.”
Her new home:
"It was like a pā". (HOME)
I remember one of the boys had a Pākehā girlfriend. She used to come to the church meetings with us and we’d ask her to stay for lunch. She’d say, “What are those black things?” And we’d say, “Pāua. Go on try some.” (FOOD)
Reg’s parents were closed Plymouth Brethren and my father-in-law was a real Englishman – cold.... They’d never had anything to do with Māori people. They were Pākehā and lived a Pākehā life. (GREETINGS)
I wasn’t allowed to speak Māori at home or to our sons. For Reg it would have meant that he wouldn’t know what was being said. (LANGUAGE)
Once, my brother came to see me unexpectedly. You know, in a Māori home your relations some to see you. They just arrive on your doorstep. But this embarrassed Reg. He wanted to be informed beforehand. My brother felt this coldness and wouldn’t come back. (HOSPITALITY)
"I fell in love with the outside of him and didn’t get to know the inside until too late."
Kākano
Tipu
Puāwai
There are five parts in the list above and to the right. Can you put them in order from the one you think would be the hardest challenge for Wi, to the smallest. Explain your top and bottom choice.
Make a T-Chart. On one side put everything Wi would think is normal, and on the other side everything that Reg would think is normal.
What were the deep cultural features in Wi and Reg that made their marriage unhappy?
Aro
1. Explain your whakataukī to the class and add it to the wall.

How does it fit with the idea of tikanga ā-iwi and he waka eke noa?

2. Use the concept wheel to:
- write four sentences, two sentences or one sentence that shows you understand all of these words.
Kākano
On each worksheet you do label:
the two cultures involved
what the conflict is (in the middle)
a good thing that happens and a bad thing that happens by the end
Tipu
On each worksheet you do label:
the two cultures involved
what the conflict is (in the middle)
what the different value/belief or custom is for each culture with evidence
a good thing that happens and a bad thing that happens by the end
Puāwai
On each worksheet you do label:
the two cultures involved
what the conflict is (in the middle)
what the different value/belief or custom is for each culture with evidence
Then answer this question:
"How did different deep cultural features affect the lives of these people?"
Tika
- I have handed in:
Three pieces of information
That are labelled, and
Annotated / summarised using
Concept words
Aromatawai
Aro
What's fake news?
Mahi mutunga

Before we begin the aromatawai for this unit let's write down some reflections. The whakataukī for this unit was: "he waka eke noa". From your point of view, if we are all in the same waka, and we have different beliefs, can we really be a big happy family or will it always be that the biggest group wins?

In your answer please use some evidence from what you have read or seen or heard to back up your points.
Let's look at one part of the story of Wi in more depth:
Once, my brother came to see me unexpectedly. You know, in a Māori home your relations some to see you. They just arrive on your doorstep. But this embarrassed Reg. He wanted to be informed beforehand. My brother felt this coldness and wouldn’t come back.
Which relates to a deep cultural aspect:
Assessment
Writing about Wi's Story
You are going to write about Wi's story now. Don't worry about how to write, or how much, or anything like that.
The only rule is that you need to try and use the words from the concept diagram (in English or Te Reo) when you tell me about Wi. Here is your question:
What wero did Wi face interacting with Pākehā tikanga?
Finding Information
Getting information from places like the internet, libraries, people or objects
Pulling out the parts of that information that answer the question you are researching
Summarising that information using the concept words for you unit.
Considering Perspectives
Figuring out what different people think about an issue
Figuring out why they think that - what their values are
Analysing Decisions
Looking at the decisions other people have made, and
Making your own decisions based on good quality information
Social Inquiry
What is the tikanga of each group?
What are the challenges and/or opportunities of this interaction?

First
you must highlight information that answers these two questions:
Then
you need to summarise these highlighted points using concept words. Here are some sentence starters:
This source shows...
In this source we can see...
There are lots of examples of [ ] in this source....

Why don't you have a go at using some of the Māori words?
This source shows...
In this source we can see...
There are lots of examples of [ ] in this source....
Making Links:
Adding: also, as well as, in addition, similarly
Effects: as a result, for this reason, so then, therefore, which

Summary of key words in Burkini Ban text
Which BIG words do you not understand?
Pre-reading task
Full transcript