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HNC Loss and Grief: Identify a range of helping strategies available to individuals and significant others in a range of settings, in the event of a loss

Learning Outcome: 2
by

shelley ferguson

on 9 November 2012

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Transcript of HNC Loss and Grief: Identify a range of helping strategies available to individuals and significant others in a range of settings, in the event of a loss

HNC Loss and Grief Helping strategies Support Support How do we offer emotional
support? What support do staff need? What support do staff need? informal support Private sector statutory sector Procedures 1. B Answers to Quiz Procedures feedback quiz FIRST THINGS TO BE DONE
If someone dies at home, you should:
• Contact the family doctor (see section 3).
• Contact the nearest relative(s).
• Contact the police if the death was violent,
accidental, unexpected, if there are unusual
circumstances or if the cause of death is not
known. If the police are called, do not touch or
move anything in the home (see section 4).
• Contact the relevant minister of religion.
• If the dead person wanted to donate their body, or
body parts (such as organs), you will need to
contact a doctor quickly.
• Contact a funeral director (undertaker) who will
arrange for the laying out of the body.
• Find out if there is a will, and if so, where it is and who is responsible for dealing with it
Register the death (within 8 days) If someone dies and there are apparently no blood
relatives, local Procurators Fiscal will make
preliminary inquiries on behalf of the Queen’s and
Lord Treasurer’s Remembrancer (QLTR). The QLTR
deals with the property of people who die when there
are no traceable relatives. DSS
Social work
GP
Hospital
Housing Nursing Homes
Residential homes
Private hospital
Undertakers
counselling hospice
counseling
Winston's wish
Alzhiemer's Scotland
Child bereavement UK
Mind
SAMH
Mentor UK
etc peers
family
friend Legal rights
Whatever the will says, the surviving husband, wife,
civil partner or children can, if they wish, claim “legal
rights” from the estate.Effective communication
Active listening
Being aware of barriers:
Physical
Environmental
Personal
Theory:
Rogers core conditions
Egan SOLER
Egan's skills helper Personal level

Supervision
Debriefing
Training
Peer support
Time
Organizational level

Good policy and procedures
Good line management
Clear lines of accountability
Good communication
Positive work culture promoting anti discriminatory practice
Why are they useful? tells us what to do
provides legal advice around registration of death
gives advice on finances
advice re wills
advice re support Voluntary & charitable sector Independent support

Unions
Professional counseling
Advice from bereavement services 1 a The Procurator Fiscal – often in cooperation with the
Local Authority’s Legal or Housing or Social Work
Department – may therefore visit the house and
speak to neighbours. The Procurator Fiscal will
collect relevant papers and documents and forward
them to the QLTR Department with a form giving as
much background information about the dead person
as possible.
Sometimes someone will report a death to the QLTR
Department directly. In those cases the QLTR
Department will decide whether to administer the
estate or to ask the local Procurator Fiscal to
investigate in more detail. 2a
The decision on whether to have a cremation or a
burial will depend on a number of factors such as the
person’s own wishes, the views of the executor, the
wishes of the person’s next of kin and family, and the
costs involved. If a death has been reported to the
Procurator Fiscal, he will usually allow the body to
be released for cremation or burial after establishing
the cause of death. The Procurator Fiscal has to
authorise the release of the body and written
permission must be obtained before a cremation can
be carried out. A form called an E1 is used and can
be collected from the Procurator Fiscal’s office. The
funeral director will be in contact with the Procurator
Fiscal and will be able to advise about when to make
the funeral arrangements 2 b Funerals can be expensive. Check where the money
for the funeral will come from before finalising
arrangements. If there is not enough money
available, you may have to bear the cost yourself. The
cost can be met from the following:
The money and possessions left by the dead person Funeral Payments from the Social Fund 3 A will can be challenged on a number of grounds, for
example:
• if the person was legally incapable of making the
will (for instance, he or she did not understand the
effects of making the will)
• if the person was improperly influenced by another
person when making the will.
If you wish to challenge a will, you should consult a
solicitor. Legal rights
Whatever the will says, the surviving husband, wife,
civil partner or children can, if they wish, claim “legal
rights” from the estate. 4 Micheal Jnr's 3 children will inherit the estate
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