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Critical Reading

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by

Julie Pearson

on 26 November 2014

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Transcript of Critical Reading

Critical Reading
When reading anything, it is important that we understand it completely. If we want to get the most out of it that we can, there are a few things to look for...
Title and Pictures
Title:
Does it have a title? What does the title tell us about the piece? What can we guess from it? Does the title tell us exactly what the piece is about, or is it just used to draw us in?
Once you have looked at the title and the pictures, read the text itself. Try to find out the following things:
1. Purpose
Why
was this written? Was it written to
inform
, to
entertain
, to
argue
, to
sell something
, or for a completely different reason?
3. Form
How
was this written? Was it written with an essay structure, a narrative structure or some other way? Was it in dot points or paragraphs? Was it in one big block of text, or were there lines dotted around?
1. Purpose
2. Audience
3. Form
4. Context
Critical Reading
Title and Pictures
Pictures:
Are there any pictures that go with the text? What do they tell us about the text? Are they there just to make it look good, or do they carry information, like a graph? What style of picture are they? Are they the kind you might find in a picture book, or in a newspaper, or in something completely different?
2. Audience
Who
was this written for? Was it written for children or teenagers or adults? For rich people or poor people? For specialists or for laymen? What else can you tell about its target audience?
4. Context
Where
was this found? Was it in a newspaper, a newsletter, a book, a poster, a flyer or somewhere else? What does this say about its purpose and target audience?
Remember to ask yourself these questions when reading the texts:
Why?

Who?
How?

Where?
As you read through it,
highlight
key words which help you to answer these questions, and so give you a better knowledge of the text.
Remember..
Types of Languages
1.
Formal
2.
Informal or Colloquial (casual)
3.
Sophisticated
4.
Technical
Formal Language
Formal language is
an academic form
of writing. This means that it is language where
colloquial
(conversation-like language)
is avoided
. It also has a
touch of sophistication
to it.

Formal language is usually written in
third person
Example:
No "I", "me"or "you".
Informal or Colloquial Language
Sophisticated Language
Technical Language
Sophisticated language means
sophisticated vocabulary
. These sophisticated words are sometimes words that
you would not use
in your
'every-day' language
or conversations.

An example of sophisticated language:
Haley discovered that she had a peculiar fascination for aquatic birds.
Informal or colloquial language is language that is used in
casual conversations
.

It can often use
slang words
and usually
does not include
a
sophisticated
vocabulary.
Technical language is language that is used
in accordance
with the
topic
.

For example:
If it were a poetry assignment, technical language would include:
alliteration
,
metaphor
,
hyperbole
.

If it was an article on science, technical language may include:
chemical
,
fossil
,
laboratory
.
Full transcript