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Still I Rise

A Poem Analysis
by

Vivian Ng

on 22 February 2013

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Transcript of Still I Rise

Connotation Background Information TPCASTT Conclusion Still I Rise Maya Angelou

"Still I Rise" by Maya Angelou is an inspirational poem which encourages the overcomings of discrimination and hatred placed upon by the unacceptable norms of society. Even though she had felt victimized and belittled at times, she learned that it should not get in the way to living her life to the happiest and fullest. Although freedom and equality should be a right and not a privilege, not everybody has that right, which "Still I Rise" encourages us to fight for our rights. Presented by:
Vivian Ng, Kimberly Jagdeo,
Lucy Pinto, Sajivini Ramachandran You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
You may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I'll rise.

Does my sexiness upset you?
Does it come as a surprise
That I dance like I've got diamonds
At the meeting of my thighs?

Out of the huts of history's shame
I rise
Up from a past that's rooted in pain
I rise
I'm a black ocean, leaping and wide,
Welling and swelling I bear in the tide.
Leaving behind nights of terror and fear
I rise
Into a daybreak that's wondrously clear
I rise
Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave,
I am the dream and the hope of the slave.
I rise
I rise
I rise. "Still I Rise" Determination
overcoming life's issues Paraphrase Connotation Simile Personification Hyperbole Repetition Allusion Metaphor Alliteration Symbolism Attitude Tone of the speaker: Proud


Determined Mood delivered to readers: Hope


Justice Shifts Rhyming scheme: from every other sentence to every sentence
4 line stanzas to a 17 line stanza
shift in emotion from stanza to stanza Title Theme Being Strong
Determined not letting words/judgement bother them Discrimination Hatred The End! Maya Angelou (Marguerite Ann Johnson)
born on April 4th 1928 in St.Louis Missouri
Education: had scholarship for dance and drama at San Francisco's labor school
dropped out and became first African-American female cable car conductor in San Francisco
Had a son named Guy that she raised as a single mom
Civil Right's person
Has written several books, poems and essays
Still alive today Criticism may hurt, may that should not be the reason for life's downfalls, but to encourage to do better. Title The speaker is also very determined and did not sway to another’s word, by comparing themselves to things that humans cannot control like the tides of the ocean, the moons and suns. This shows determination because if the speaker were to compare themself to objects that are easily regulated by humans then it would suggest that one is easily influenced and does not have her own standpoints in matters. After having finished reading this poem some does feel a sense of justice towards the outcome of the story to the poem. Since in the end it is suggested that to which the “I” is referred to will keeping rising until he/she is satisfied with his/her situation. And in any contexts like movies or books people would feel the most justice when good overcomes evil. No matter what you try to do, bring me down or tear my hopes, I still will rise. You may write me down in history
With your bitter, twisted lies,
You may trod me in the very dirt
But still, like dust, I'll rise.

Does my sassiness upset you?
Why are you beset with gloom?
'Cause I walk like I've got oil wells
Pumping in my living room.

Just like moons and like suns,
With the certainty of tides,
Just like hopes springing high,
Still I'll rise.

Did you want to see me broken?
Bowed head and lowered eyes?
Shoulders falling down like teardrops.
Weakened by my soulful cries.

Does my haughtiness offend you?
Don't you take it awful hard
'Cause I laugh like I've got gold mines
Diggin' in my own back yard. Analyzing Literary Devices Rhetorical Question Still I Rise The speaker talks proudly of his/her origins and did not let others’ criticisms/beliefs changed what he/she believes in. When you read this poem one of the greatest emotion you can extract from this literature is the feeling of hope, since when you hear about all the hardships of one’s life and still see that they are still are living really strong it gives us the feeling of hope to allow us to be able to take on our own obstacles. You may write me down in history
With your bitter, twisted lies,
You may trod me in the very dirt
But still, like dust, I'll rise.

Does my sassiness upset you?
Why are you beset with gloom?
'Cause I walk like I've got oil wells
Pumping in my living room.

Just like moons and like suns,
With the certainty of tides,
Just like hopes springing high,
Still I'll rise.

Did you want to see me broken?
Bowed head and lowered eyes?
Shoulders falling down like teardrops.
Weakened by my soulful cries.

Does my haughtiness offend you?
Don't you take it awful hard
'Cause I laugh like I've got gold mines
Diggin' in my own back yard. You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
You may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I'll rise.

Does my sexiness upset you?
Does it come as a surprise
That I dance like I've got diamonds
At the meeting of my thighs?

Out of the huts of history's shame
I rise
Up from a past that's rooted in pain
I rise
I'm a black ocean, leaping and wide,
Welling and swelling I bear in the tide.
Leaving behind nights of terror and fear
I rise
Into a daybreak that's wondrously clear
I rise
Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave,
I am the dream and the hope of the slave.
I rise
I rise
I rise. Equality Criticism
Full transcript