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Visual Thinking Strategies

Find Evidence and Improve Critical Thinking Through Reading Visuals
by

Rachel Hubbard

on 11 February 2014

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Transcript of Visual Thinking Strategies

Visual Thinking Strategies
What is VTS?
Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) is a teaching method that focuses on open-ended yet highly-structured discussions of visual art - the outcome of which is a significant increase in students' critical thinking, language and literacy skills along the way.
Intro to VTS
Teacher Behaviors
Paraphrase
Positive
Encouraging
Affirming
Models how to summarize and frame
"You have suggested..."
Pointing with laser or finger so all students know what is being discussed
Ties language (academic vocabulary) to visual
New York Times Weekly VTS
VTS QUESTIONS

Encourages interpretation and storytelling
Suggests image is about something
Invites comments of any type (formal art qualities and narrative)
DIFFERENT from "What do you see?" (Limiting)
•Paraphrase comments neutrally
•Point at the area being discussed
•Link and frame student comments
•Look carefully at works of art/visuals
•Talk about what they observe
•Back up their ideas with evidence
•Listen to and consider the views of others
•Discuss many possible interpretations
Facilitation Techniques:
Students are asked to:
THOUGHT BUBBLES

Activities to use with VTS
Visual Thinking Strategies Information:
http://vtshome.org/

Guggenheim
http://www.guggenheim.org/new-york/education/school-educator-programs/teacher-resources/arts-curriculum-online

METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART
http://www.metmuseum.org/learn/for-educators/lesson-plans
http://www.metmuseum.org/learn/for-educators/timeline

Google Art Project
http://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/project/art-project

Milwaukee Art Museum
http://teachers.mam.org/collection/teaching-with-art/visual-thinking-strategies-vts/

http://www.nelson-atkins.org/education/ERC.cfm

ART 21
http://www.art21.org/

ART BABBLE
http://artbabble.org/

The Kennedy Center Arts Edge
http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/educators/lessons.aspx


Links & Resources
http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/category/lesson-plans/whats-going-on-in-this-picture/
Thought Bubbles
One word description share
Objective/Subjective List
"See/Think" Chart
Socratic Discussion
Back to Back Describe/Act (Living Sculpture)/Draw
Draw/describe
! and ? (Excitement and Wonder)

"Cranium"
Session Goals
Understand how to facilitate "reading" visuals to find evidence
Knowledgeably incorporate meaningful visuals in curriculum
Have one (or more) visuals to use in your classroom tomorrow.
What do you see that makes you say that?
Requires grounding interpretation in visual EVIDENCE
Encourages Fact-based and logical debates
DIFFERENT from "Why do you think so?"
Teachers are asked to use three open-ended questions:
What's going on in this picture?
What more can we find?
Prompts deeper, more thoughtful learning
Allows for multiple perspectives and answers
What teacher-behaviors did you see modeled?
Make Your Case! Socratic Seminar
After looking at image, read a quote or information from a critic.
Arbitrarily divide the group in half
One group SUPPORTS
One group REFUTES
Individually critique
Partner critique
Group critique
DEBATE
http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/R

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas - READING
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.7 Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

Comprehension and Collaboration - SPEAKING AND LISTENING
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.1 Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.2 Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.


CONNECTION TO COMMON CORE
http://www.guggenheim.org/new-york/education/school-educator-programs/teacher-resources/arts-curriculum-online?view=item&catid=725&id=137
BIOLOGY - Kandinsky's was interested in biology and zoology
MUSIC - Kandinsky related art to music
GEOMETRY - Kandinsky believed certain shapes were identified with specific colors universally
PSYCHOLOGY - Kandinsky had Synesthesia
http://www.metmuseum.org/learn/for-educators/lesson-plans-and-pre-visit-guides/geometric-design-in-islamic-art
http://www.metmuseum.org/learn/for-educators/lesson-plans-and-pre-visit-guides/the-burghers-of-calais

http://www.metmuseum.org/~/media/Files/Learn/For%20Educators/Publications%20for%20Educators/Burghers.pdf
http://www.metmuseum.org/events/programs/k12-educator-programs/connecting-collections

K–12 Educator Program - NYC Metropolitan Museum, Guggenheim, MoMA, Whitney

Connecting Collections: Integrating Modern and Contemporary Art into the Classroom
Person A: Describer
Person B: Artist
Person C: Actor/Living Sculpture

Only Person A looks at the image
Persons B and C do not look at image, but draw/act the pose based on Person A's description

Group of 3 or Group or 2 with Describer and either Artist OR Actor
CONNECTION TO CLOSE READING
MATH
HEALTH
ELA
I SEE: I THINK:
CHART
Informal Webbing
Topic: THEME
CONTROVERSY
VIETNAM WAR
CIVIL RIGHTS
SPACE RACE
SOLDIERS -
MEN IN GREEN
UNIFORMS
Army Jeep
ROBERT
&
JOHN F.
KENNEDY
MARTIN LUTHER KING, Jr.
ASTRONAUT
CHART
OBJECTIVE: SUBJECTIVE:
Raushenberg said the print “was conceived to remind us of love, terror, violence of the last ten years. Danger lies in forgetting.”
Bohemia Lies by the Sea
Poem

If houses here are green, I'll step inside a house.
If bridges here are sound, I'll walk on solid ground.
If love's labour's lost in every age, I'll gladly lose it here.

If it's not me, it's one who is as good as me.

If a word here borders on me, I'll let it border.
If Bohemia still lies by the sea, I'll believe in the sea again.
And believing in the sea, thus I can hope for land.

If it's me, then it's anyone, for he's as worthy as me.
I want nothing more for myself. I want to go under.

Under – that means the sea, there I'll find Bohemia again.
From my grave, I wake in peace.
From deep down I know now, and I'm not lost.

Come here, all you Bohemians, seafarers, dock whores, and ships
unanchored. Don't you want to be Bohemians, all you Illyrians,
Veronese and Venetians. Play the comedies that make us laugh

until we cry. And err a hundred times,
as I erred and never withstood the trials,
though I did withstand them time after time.

As Bohemia withstood them and one fine day
was released to the sea and now lies by water.

I still border on a word and on another land,
I border, like little else, on everything more and more,

a Bohemian, a wandering minstrel, who has nothing, who
is held by nothing, gifted only at seeing, by a doubtful sea,
the land of my choice.

Ingeborg Bachmann

from Darkness Spoken: Collected Poems of Ingeborg Bachmann, translated by Peter Filkins, copyright © 2006 Zephyr Press.

English Language Arts - Poetry. Shakespeare. Utopic Theme
Social Studies - Poppies - WWI
http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/educators/lessons/grade-9-12/Fibonacci_Visual_Art.aspx#Preparation

Encourages interpretation and storytelling
Suggests image is about something
Invites comments of any type (formal art qualities and narrative)
DIFFERENT from "What do you see?" (Limiting)

What do you see that makes you say that?

Requires grounding interpretation in visual EVIDENCE
Encourages Fact-based and logical debates
DIFFERENT from "Why do you think so?"

Teachers are asked to use three open-ended questions:

What's going on in this picture?

What more can we find?

Prompts deeper, more thoughtful learning
Allows for multiple perspectives and answers
Full transcript