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Ravensbruck Consentration Camp for Women

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by

Naomi B.

on 17 December 2012

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Transcript of Ravensbruck Consentration Camp for Women

How Ravnesbruck Came About
Ravensbruck was a womans concentration camp during World War ll located in northern Germany.
-Construction of the camp began in November
1938 by SS leader Heinrich Himmler.
-Unusual that it was a camp primarily for woman.
-Opened in May 1939.
- In the spring of 1941, the SS authorities made a small men's camp exactly like the main camp.
- 1939 - 1945, over 130,000 female prisoners passed through the Ravensbruck camp system.
-around 40,000, Polish and 26,000, Jewish. Between 15,000 and 32,000 of the total survived. Life At Camp
-When a new prisoner arrived at Ravensbrück she was required to wear a color-coded triangle (a Winkel) that identified her by category with a letter sewn in the triangle that showed the prisoner's nationality.
-Due to the constant growth of the population, the camp had to be enlarged four times during the war. By the end of 1941, there were 12,000 prisoners. The Children of Ravensbruck - Hundreds of children were killed in Ravensbruck. The cruelty of the Nazi's to children had no limits. The children had almost no chance of survival at Ravensbruck.
-Children and babies were in fact sentenced to death before they were born. Newborn babies were immediately separated from their mother and drowned or thrown into a locked room with no air until they died. Most of the time, this was done in front of the mother.
- Several children were also used for sadistic "medical" experiments.
- Only the strongest children could survive. Those children had to work day and night with the women in the workshop and help them with the heaviest labor. Only very few of these children survived the war. The Uckermark "Youth Camp" Conclusion Ravensbruck Concentration Camp for Women By: Naomi Barghiel This is the "Walzkommando" in Ravensbruck. The Nazi's would make the woman pull this until they died. At times, soldiers would have marksmanship competitions using the most beautiful of inmates as their targets. - 1945, the SS was afraid that the Soviet Army was approaching and would see what would happen at the camp, so they exterminated as many prisoners as they could.
-The camp was liberated by the Russian Army on April 30th, 1945. The survivors of the camp were freed in the following hours by a Russian scout unit.
- With the Russians only hours away, the SS ordered the women still physically well enough to walk to leave the camp, forcing over 20,000 prisoners on a death march toward northern Mecklenburg. Shortly before the evacuation, the Germans had handed over 7000 female prisoners, mostly French, to officials of the Swedish and Danish Red Cross. - Every two or three weeks, the SS commandant of the camp Suhren and the SS doctors Schwarzhuber and Pflaum selected the ill or weak women for the "transport to Mittweida". The women had to lift their skirts over their hips and run in front of the SS guards and doctors.
- Woman who had scars, cuts, broken bones, or those who were simply too weak or ill to do anything were sent to a "medical room" called Uckermark. It was really a place that was sealed shut with no food, or really barely any medical care until they died.
- Others trucks were sealed German freight trucks, often named by the prisoners "Green Mina".
-Mittweida" was an SS code name for gassing. "Mittweida" was supposed to be a place where prisoners could recover from their slave work. Of course, it was an imaginary place and "Mittweida" was just another word for "gas chamber". - Barracks built for 250 women later kept 1,500 or 2,000, with three to four to a bed.

- Thousands of women did not even have part of a bed, and were lying on the floor, without even a blanket. When 500 Jewish women arrived from Hungary in the fall of 1944, they were placed in a huge tent with a straw floor and died in together. -The women were woken up by 4:00 a.m. Before they had to wake up, as many as 500 women stood in the latrine around three “toilets” with no doors. After standing outside until everyone had their turn, they drank their small portion of coffee and went off to work. They returned to their assigned barracks for their noontime soup and again in the evening, when the cycle was repeated.
- On Sundays the women were not required to work, and socialized in the barracks or outside to the limited extent possible Here are some of the many woman that were entering the camp: Hermine Brausteiner was a female SS-guard at German extermination camp Majdanek and Ravensbruck.
Hermine chose to abuse the woman and children and whipped several woman to death.
As she worked with other SS guards she would stomp some of the woman to death. This way she earned the nickname The Stomping Mare. For her work, she was awarded the War Merit Cross, 2nd Class in 1943.
While Majdanek was being evacuated, she was ordered to be a guard in Ravensbruck in January 1944.
She would carry a special whip that would automatically kill the victim.
While she was in West Germany a witness spoke that Hermine “seized children by their hair and threw them on trucks heading to the gas chambers.” Others said that she would viciously beat the woman and children.
Brausteiner was found guilty of the murder of 80 people; the murder of 102 children; and a total of 1000 murders.
Hermine Brausteiner was sentenced to prison for life until she was let go because of lack of health, she was going to die anyway.
She died in 1999 -Due to the constant growth of the population, the camp had to be enlarged four times during the war. By the end of 1941, there were about 12,000 prisoners.- The conditions of life in Ravensbrück were as difficult as in all the other concentration camps: beating, starvation, hanging gassing, torture, and shooting happened daily. -The Nazi's obviously had absolutely no mercy for anyone, not even the babies/children. -Due to the constant growth of the population, the camp had to be enlarged four times during the war. By the end of 1941, there were about 12,000 prisoners. The conditions of life in Ravensbruck were as difficult as in all the other concentration camps: beating, starvation, hanging gassing, torture, and shooting happened daily. The Nazi's obviously had absolutely no mercy for anyone, not even the babies/children. THANK YOU The main camp contained 18 barracks; two of these barracks served as a prisoners sickbay, two served as warehouses, one served as a penal block, and one functioned as the camp prison until 1939 when a separate prison was built. The remaining 12 barracks served as the prisoners housing, in which prisoners slept in three-tiered wooden bunks. This is a memoir by World War ll survivor Karolina Lanckoronska. This is one of the camps gassing chambers. This is one of the camps gassing chambers. This is a over head view of the Uckermark Youth Camp. This is a map of where Ravensbruck was located.
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