Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Prefixes and Suffixes

No description
by

Dayana Maybeth Davadi

on 14 August 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Prefixes and Suffixes

Suffixes
Try to see if you can find the suffixes in the following sentences.
Suffixes
Suffixes
Like roots, many prefixes come from Latin or Greek.

Prefix: is a part attached to the beginning of a base word or root.
Prefixes
Prefixes
Prefixes and Suffixes
Examples of Suffixes
Many suffixes can change the meaning of the base word or root when they are added.
Consider how the meaning of the prefixes relate to the meaning of the English words.
Examples of Prefixes:
Suffixes
The meaning of a prefix combines with the meaning of the base word or root.
For example, the prefix in-often means "not," as in indirect, which means " not direct.
Prefixes
One Way to figure out the meaning of new words is to consider the meaning of their prefixes.
Extra-
De-
Milli-
Prefix
Meaning
Beyond
Thousand
Opposite
Words
Extraordinary, Extravagant
Ab-
From
Milligram, Million, Millimeter
Deactivate, Deform, Declassify
Abnormal, Abstain, Abolish
Prefixes
Try to see if you can find the prefixes in the following sentences:
1) I have deactivated the bomb, we have saved millions of lives.
2) Do we need our bicycles to ride to the movie theater to see the "Abnormal Monster" or should just see The "Extraordinary Aliens from the Other Planet" in my house?
Answer:
Bi-cycle, Ad-normal, Extra-ordinary
Suffixes: Is a word part attached to the end of a base word or root.
They can also be used to change a word's part of speech.
The meaning of a suffix combines with the meaning of the base word or root.
They can also be used to change the part of speech.
A perfect example would be
Schoolwise
School

(A Place of education) is a noun and when put together with the suffix
Wise
(Smart & intelligent or in reference to) which is a verb put together is
Schoolwise
meaning in reference to education(which is a verb when its put together)
.
Suffix
Meaning
Words
-oid
-ble
-ly
-ment
resembling
to do repeatedly
in what way
process
Judgment
Asteroid, Android
Slowly, Transparently
Stumble, Rumble
1. The Android has stumbled on the asteroid that is slowly heading towards earth.
Answer: Andr-oid , Stum-bled, Aster-oid, Slow-ly, Tow-ards
2. A judge's job is to always place judgement on any Contemptuous or lawbreaking Action that happens in society.
Answer: Al-ways, judge-ment, Contemptu-ous, Act-ion
Answer: De-activated, milli-ons
Answer: Bi-cycle, Ab-normal, Extra-ordinary.
The End
Thank you for your attention
Unit 9 L&S
Vocabulary 1

grip
noun
1. a special mode of clasping hands:
"Members of the club use the secret grip.".
verb (used without object), gripped or gript, gripping.
1. to take firm hold; hold fast.
verb (used with object), gripped or gript, gripping.
1. to grasp or seize firmly; hold fast:
"We gripped the sides of the boat as the waves tossed us about."
Idioms
1. come to grips with, a.to encounter; meet; cope with:
"She had never come to grips with such a situation before."
Origin Old English
before 900; Middle English, Old English gripe grasp (noun); cognate with German Griff, Old English gripa handful; see gripe
Related forms
Can be confused Expand
grip, gripe, grippe.
Synonyms Expand
1. impress, attract, rivet, hold, fascinate.

Derived Forms
gripper, noun
grippingly, adverb that has something to grab it
grip-per
noun
1. a person or thing that grips.
grip-ping
adjective
1.holding the attention or interest intensely.

frag-ile
adjective
1. easily broken, shattered, or damaged; delicate; brittle; frail:
"a fragile ceramic container; a very fragile alliance."
2. vulnerably delicate, as in appearance:
"She has a fragile beauty."
Origin Expand
Latin
1505-1515
1505-15; < Latin fragilis, equivalent to frag- (variant stem of frangere to break ) + -ilis -ile
Related forms Expand
fragilely, adverb
fragility [fruh-jil-i-tee] (Show Spelled), fragileness, noun
dec-ade
noun
1. a period of ten years:
"the three decades from 1776 to 1806."


Origin Expand
late Middle English
Middle French
Late Latin
Greek
1425-1475
1425-75; late Middle English < Middle French < Late Latin
decad- (stem of decas) < Greek dekad- (stem of dekás)
group of ten, equivalent to dék (a) ten + -ad- -ade2
Related forms Expand half-decade, noun A period of five years
Example:Young Adam was written almost a decade earlier.

a-larm-ing
adjective
1. causing alarm or fear:
"an alarming case of vulnerably; an alarming lack of respect."
Origin Expand
1670-1680
1670-80; alarm + -ing2
Related forms Expand
Alarm: noun.
any sound, outcry, or information intended to warn of approaching danger:
Paul Revere raced through the countryside raising the alarm that the British were coming
verb (used with object)
to make fearful or apprehensive; distress.
Even pedestrians, she says, find auckland's congestion alarming



de-crease
verb (used without object), decreased, decreasing.
1. to diminish or lessen in extent, quantity, strength, power, etc.:
"During the ten-day march across the desert their supply of water decreased rapidly."
verb (used with object), decreased, decreasing.
2. to make less; cause to diminish:
"to decrease one's work load."
noun
3.
the act or process of decreasing; condition of being decreased; gradual reduction:
"a decrease in sales; a decrease in intensity."
"The decrease in sales was almost 20 percent."
igin Expand
Middle English
Old French
Latin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English decres (noun), decresen (v.) < Old French decreiss-,
long stem of decreistre < Latin dēcrēscere (dē- de- + crēscere to grow); see crescent
Related forms Expand
undecreased, adjective
Synonyms Expand
1. wane, lessen, fall off, decline, contract, abate. Decrease, diminish, dwindle, shrink imply becoming smaller or less in amount
cri-sis
noun, plural crises [krahy-seez] (Show Spelled)
1. a stage in a sequence of events at which the trend of all future events, especially for better or for worse, is determined; turning point.

adjective
6. of, referring to, or for use in dealing with a crisis.
Origin Expand late Middle English
Latin
Greek
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English < Latin < Greek krísis decision, equivalent to kri- variant stem of krī́nein to decide, separate, judge + -sis -sis
Related forms Expand
crisic, adjective
postcrisis, adjective, noun, plural postcrises. after crisis
Synonyms
1. See emergency.
They concluded that China wouldn't take advantage of the global crisis situation.

dev-as-tat-ing
adjective
1. tending or threatening to devastate :
"a devastating fire."
Origin Expand
1625-1635
1625-35; devastate + -ing2
Related forms Expand
dev-as-tate
verb (used with object), devastated, devastating.
1. to lay waste; render desolate:
"The invaders devastated the city.

Synonyms: destroy, sack, despoil, raze, ruin, level.
Antonyms: create, erect, develop.
2. to overwhelm.
devastative, adjective
devastator, noun
undevastated, adjective


a-dapt
verb (used with object)
1. to make suitable to requirements or conditions; adjust or modify fittingly:
"They adapted themselves to the change quickly. He adapted the novel for movies."
verb (used without object)
2. to adjust oneself to different conditions, environment, etc.:
"to adapt easily to all circumstances."
Origin Expand
French
Latin

1605-1615
1605-15; < Latin adaptāre to fit, adjust, perhaps via French adapter. See ad-, apt
Related forms Expand nonadapting, adjective That cannot get adapted
Expand
Synonyms Expand
1. fit, accommodate, suit, reconcile, conform; modify, rework, convert.
Full transcript