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Literary Devices in Chapter 2 in The Great Gatsby

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by

Laura Brooks

on 3 December 2013

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Transcript of Literary Devices in Chapter 2 in The Great Gatsby

Literary Devices in Chapter 2
of
The Great Gatsby

"a fantastic farm where ashes grow like wheat into ridges and hills and grotesque gardens" (p. 27)
Simile - setting and mood
The quote refers to the valley of ashes, an area of extreme pollution between West Egg and New York. The ashes cover everything like in a field of wheat. It creates a grim mood, reflecting on the downside of the industrial boom of the 1920's
"The late afternoon sky bloomed in the window for a moment" (p. 35)
Personification - setting
The sky can not actually bloom like a flower. This shows the setting; it is in the early evening just as the sun is going down.
"His wife was shrill, languid, handsome, and horrible" (p. 32)
Alliteration - Character
It is talking about Mr. McKee's wife and emphasizes that she is handsome but is also horrible all at the same time.
"I've been drunk twice in my life, and the second was that night" (p. 31)
Flashback - character
The flashback shows that Nick's new circle of friends are wealthy people who can afford bootlegged alcohol. It also shows that Nick is not avid party-goer and the night is especially memorable.
"'Neither of them can stand the person they’re married to.'" (p. 34)
Irony - Character
Both Tom and Myrtle are married to people who they cannot stand and are in love with each other. The irony is that they got themselves into the unhappy marriages and they can not be happy together because they are married to other people.
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