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Placement Concept Map (Stage 2)

EPR / EEE Assignment 2 (213075543 Emma Amory)
by

Emma Amory

on 8 October 2013

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Transcript of Placement Concept Map (Stage 2)

CURRICULUM
PEDAGOGY
ASSESSMENT
PLANNING
ENVIRONMENT
CREATIVITY
TECHNOLOGY
MOTIVATION
LEARNERS
How does

Orchard Grove Primary School
facilitate and nurture creativity
in young learners?
How does

Orchard Grove Primary School
create technologically literate learners that can confidently interact with our global community?
What motivates and drives the learners at
Orchard Grove Primary School
?
What kind of Assessment techniques does my mentor at
Orchard Grove Primary School

employ and how does this benefit the learners?
What kind of learning spaces exist within
Orchard Grove Primary School
and does this affect the quality of learning?
How does
Orchard Grove Primary School
plan and facilitate learning opportunities?
What emphasis does
Orchard Grove Primary School
place on their curriculum and how do they implement it?
How does
Orchard Grove Primary School
support and develop inquiry based pedagogies?
They do not have an iPad or Laptop lease program.
“Happiness is not something that can be taught, bought or bestowed…” (Bibby 2010, p. 136) but something to be pursued and earned with hard work and perseverance.
“There are no complex tasks or forms of thinking whose mastery is best optimised by pedagogical neglect” (Eisner 2002, p. 46). I expect that my personal pedagogies and theories will fundamentally experience a process of refinement through constant objective and dedicated reflection and research, because “teaching that does not promote learning makes as much sense as selling that does not promote buying” (Eisner 2002, p. 46).
Before we rush to adopt iPad programs in our schools, we should stop to consider the consequences of blithely giving this advanced technology such a central position in our lives. Or at the very least, develop advanced systems to maintain these devices in controlled learning environments.

At the end of the day, these devices should be considered as the proverbial pen and paper: valuable tools for learning, but not the answer to teaching and learning in general.

“As long as programmed environments like cyberspace exist, [students] are vulnerable to being dematerialised through social inscription and construction”
(Springgay 2007, p. 18).
INQUIRY-BASED

LEARNING
Stages of Inquiry
Tuning In, Finding Out, Sorting Out, Going Further, Making Conclusions and Taking Action.
Bloom's Revised Taxonomy
Remember, Understand, Apply, Analyze, Evaluate and Create.
5E Instructional Model
Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate and Evaluate.
COGNITIVE
DEVELOPMENT
Vygotsky’s sociocultural theory dictates that all children are capable learners through social interaction (with teachers and capable peers) and practical applications (i.e. learning by ‘doing’) (Daniels et. al. 2007, p. 13). His Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) theory suggests that children progress through stages or zones of learning from “their actual level to their potential level of development” (Oakley 2004, p. 41).
Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs theory (Heylighen 1992, p. 39) dictates that we cannot engage a young learner in higher order thinking, unless the fundamental or basic needs of the child are being met.
LEV VYGOTSKY
ABRAHAM MASLOW
“Curriculum control lies at the basis of social selection in school, for curriculum generates culturally specific demands on academic performance…”
(Teese 1989 p. 253).
VIRTUAL
BACKPACK
The students are particularly motivated by popular culture and media.
The educators in this community motivate and support each other.
Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs theory (Heylighen 1992, p. 39) dictates that we cannot engage a young learner in higher order thinking, unless the fundamental or basic needs of the child are being met.
JEAN PIAGET
Logical thinking, mathematical and literary processing is best attempted in the morning, as the left-hemisphere of the human brain is more dominant in the morning (Davis 1987).
“The arts can serve as a model for teaching the subjects we usually think of as academic” (Eisner 2002, p. 196).
Art and learning should go hand in hand as a transformative undertaking as “learning is a fluid, dynamic process, I believe what we must do is to act as if our lives are ongoing works of art“.
(Pearse 2011, p. 38).
The theory of ‘progressive education’ (Churchill 2011, p. 570) that we encountered in class “…advocates student-centred, co-constructed and flexible teaching approaches [and] facilitates broader social change by preparing young people to actively and critically engage in the broader social world” (Churchill 2011, p. 570).
PROGRESSIVE EDUCATION
"Sort of sustained environment that results from a thoughtful selection and arrangement of elements in the physical environment shows how the environment can act as a teacher and support both group and individual learning”
(Ridgeway 2006, p. 114).
Education should be approached “with the joy and pleasure of discovery in a learning environment that nurtures respect, recognizes unique ideas, and opens pathways to engagement”
(Albertson 2007, p. 18)
Grade 2 does not take part in NAPLAN, however many preparatory discussions took place.
The ‘funds of knowledge’ (Gonzalez et al. 2009, p. 1) approach would suggest that we take into consideration ‘…the historically accumulated and culturally developed bodies of knowledge and skills essential for household or individual functioning and wellbeing” (Gonzalez 2009, p. 72 & 73), otherwise known as the ‘virtual backpack’ (Thompson 2002, p. 18).
This Concept Map was brought to you by Rainbow Popcorn and powered by the energy of Red Bull.
THANK-YOU!
“Education is not a linear process of preparation for the future: it is about cultivating the talents and sensibilities through which we can live our best lives in the present and create the future for ourselves” (Robinson 2011, p. 198).

Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity, not just in content but also in the delivery of knowledge.
Creativity explicitly contributes to the sense of school community and environments.
The school walls are covered in the artwork of students in a stimulating and inspiring manner.
All students are given the opportunity to visually present their ideas in a representational manner.
They acknowledge that society is globalizing.
Implicitly acknowledged in every section is diversity and inclusion.
How can I incorporate this knowledge into my planning to create contextualised and highly relevant classes?
How am I going to account for the exceptional learners and early finishers?
How am I going to account for challenged learners?
Converting to AusVELS in preparation for 2014 (currently employs VELS).
Planning occurs on curriculum days (one term ahead of schedule) around key understandings.
Consistent timetable structure implemented school-wide.
A strong emphasis is placed on numeracy and literacy throughout the school.
“Arts are essential for human life and growth [and] are for everybody” (Kohl 2013, p. xxi). It is important to remember that “the ability to imagine is an essential ingredient to good teaching” (Jagia 1994
p. 14) and creative problem solving is an unquestionably critical tool for a ‘good’ teacher and ‘good’ teaching.
There is approximately five computers and one SmartBoard in every classroom.
The school has a range of intranet systems for parents, teachers and students to stay connected.
The school acknowledge multimedia resources as legitimate learning opportunities.
“Efforts to support equity in schools must then be accompanied by complementary social policies seeking to overcome poverty and inequality” (Churchill et al. 2011, p. 583).
MOST IMPORTANTLY,
WHAT DO I DO IF I MAKE THEM CRY?!
The students themselves are passionate about creating and
making.
There are a number of major stakeholders in the school community.
This school does not have a religious affiliation.
Well being support is outsourced for the students and staff.
A range of assessment strategies are employed by my mentor.
Minimal record taking maintained by my mentor.
When a child misses a formal assessment they are accommodated at the next possible opportunity.
All learners expected to take place in assessments, regardless of ability or circumstances.
This school has a range of traditional classroom environments
and spaces.
A range of formal and informal classroom management strategies were employed by my mentor.
Extensive indoor and outdoor recreational spaces.
Well resourced, progressive library resource centre.
Composite year levels are present within the school due to numbers.
Homework is introduced on Monday and shared on Friday.
A tension exists between traditional and progressive pedagogical approaches.
Specialist subjects for Grade 2 include Art, Spanish, Library, Performing Arts and Physical Education.
Core subjects for Grade 2 include English, Maths and Integrated Studies.
Horizontal leadership teams for year levels and specialist heads meet once a week.
This school subscribes to the Challenge Based Learning program developed by Apple.
Teachers maintain autonomy within their own classroom, delivering same content in a differentiated manner.
Planning occurs in a biennial rotational basis to both prevent repetition in composite classes.
No matter what, remain flexible, reliable, patient and consistent.
This school strongly supports and facilitates Professional Development.
Repercussions for disrespectful misbehavior are decided by teachers prerogative.
What kind of Virtual Backpacks do my students have?
What behavioral characteristics am I going to encounter?
CLASSROOM

MANAGEMENT
We are entering a global and technologically connected economy and this should be reflected in the classroom.
Creativity is central to my teaching philosophy and
is the strongest interdisciplinary skill I have.
Teaching is a vocational profession.
Assessment is part of an ongoing learning cycle and is ineffective if not interpreted by the learners.
The learning space is one of the most significant contributors to effective learning: both physically and emotionally.
Identifiably the greatest gap in my knowledge, I believe this is something that will develop through practical experience.
Curriculum plays a central role in the education of all learners.
It is my role as an ethically responsible educator to equip myself with multiple teaching strategies to adapt for every learner that enters my classroom.
My mentor strongly supports creative thinking and problem solving.
Four schools (including Blackburn South, Killoura, Mirrabooka and Warrawong Primary Schools) coalesced in 1991, resulting in the current Orchard Grove Primary School site.
This has contributed to what Principal Mrs. Schubert describes as “rich history” (OGPS Website 2013), with three house names being retained (with the addition of Wurundjeri, an acknowledgment of the traditional lands of Aboriginal Peoples) creating a strong connection to school community, spirit and history.
Orchard Grove Primary School currently has approximately 520 enrolled students across 22 classes, from Foundation to Grade 6, of which 7 are composite due to student numbers. Students are predominantly from the mid to upper quartiles of the Index of Community Socio-Educational Advantage (ICSEA) scale, suggesting no outstanding socio-economic factors. Boys outnumber girls by just 17 students.
As evidenced in the timetable, every day is structured to the needs of the broader shared timetable of the school, with one-hour breaks occurring at 11:00am and 1:00pm each day. In particular, the Year 2ES class experiences a distinctive literacy and numeracy block in the mornings, with an integrated studies block occurring towards the latter half of the day. Davis (1987) asserts that logical thinking, mathematical and literary processing is best attempted in the morning, as the left-hemisphere of the human brain is more dominant in the morning. This leaves valuable time for reflection, higher-order thinking and self-actualisation activities for the afternoon (Heylighen 1992).
Whilst physical space is crucial to the effective learning of a young person, learning can also be facilitated in a friendly and stimulating environment “with the joy and pleasure of discovery in a learning environment that nurtures respect, recognizes unique ideas, and opens pathways to engagement” (Albertson 2007, p. 18). On entering this school community, you are not only met by the “…core values of Integrity, Respect, Valuing Diversity, Working Together and Fostering Growth” (My School 2013) depicted on either side of the entrance, but these values “underpin the expected behaviours and attitudes of the students, staff and school community” (My School 2013) as a whole. The murals depicted in Figure 2 also clearly demonstrate the value this school places on creativity and expression. Kohl (2013) argues that the creative arts are essentially a human endeavour and are “essential for human life and growth” (Kohl 2013, p. xxi); “the ability to imagine is an essential ingredient to good teaching” (Jagia 1994 p. 14).
Orchard Grove Primary School is a government primary school located in the Eastern metropolitan city of Blackburn South, just 20 minutes from the heart of Melbourne.
Located at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac, the school is surrounded by open Council native parklands (known as the Wurundjeri Walk) and various sporting grounds, contributing to the “very peaceful and tranquil setting that promotes positive physical and passive play” (OGPS Website 2013) for learners.
Uniquely situated, Orchard Grove Primary School is a vibrant and diverse learning community that activity seeks to meet the varied needs of its’ learners. Every aspect of this institution is specifically designed around its’ learners and seeks to support the core values of “Integrity, Respect, Valuing Diversity, Working Together and Fostering Growth” (My School 2013). Individuality and expression is valued in every member of this learning population and Orchard Grove Primary School clearly strives to meet those ideals.
Each classroom is resourced with 5 desktop computers, interactive white boards and 5 laptop computers, with two full ICT classrooms equipped to cater for general school activities (through the Library Resource Centre). A large interactive smart board has also recently been installed in the staff room in the hopes that it will encourage and facilitate further professional development and learning (see Figure 5). But “as long as programmed environments like cyberspace exist, [students] are vulnerable to being dematerialised through social inscription and construction” (Springgay 2007, p. 18).
Orchard Grove Primary School actively “aim[s] to teach students to become digitally literate” (OGPS Website 2013) at home and at a classroom level, acknowledging that “online tools, such as blogs and wikis, are powerful learning tools” (OGPS Website 2013) for both the classroom and the general community.
Orchard Grove Primary School currently has approximately 520 enrolled students across 22 classes, from Foundation to Grade 6, of which 7 are composite due to student numbers. Students are predominantly from the mid to upper quartiles of the Index of Community Socio-Educational Advantage (ICSEA) scale, suggesting no outstanding socio-economic factors. Boys outnumber girls by just 17 students.
Team planning forms the basis of the curriculum design at Orchard Grove Primary School (OGPS Website 2013) both in vertical curriculum strands (i.e. integrated studies or mathematics) and horizontal year level collegiate development, and can essentially be described as a spiral. Planning occurs in a biennial rotational basis to both prevent repetition in composite classes and ensure the “same learning opportunities are available to all children within level teams” (OGPS Annual Report 2011, page 2).
This space serves as break room and conference room to the 32 (equivalent) full-time teaching staff and 10 non-teaching support staff, encouraging professional learning discussions and collegiate problem solving.
Eisner (2004) states that the arts are a strong vehicle to develop self-confidence and pride in personal efforts and process.
Full transcript