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COM10006 Week 4 Lecture

Plagiarism, Citing and Referencing / Focus on gendered subjects
by

Lucy Nicholas

on 4 March 2014

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Transcript of COM10006 Week 4 Lecture

Week 4: Plagiarism, citing and referencing (and focus on gendered subjects)
More Examples: Perspectives on Gender Differences in Education
Drawing on Other People's Work in the body of your Writing through Citation: Why?
Three Themes from the Research Literature Explored in the Report
1. Prevalent idea that men are innately superior to women in maths, i.e. gendered cognitive differences

2. Women's lack of interest in these subjects

3. The environment of these jobs for women.
now lets look closely at an example of how this report draws on sources ...
BECAUSE An essay is a synthesis of existing knowledge to create new knowledge and...

An essay is an account of your research process: it is research into an academic area.

To "springboard" from to introduce / support / refute a perspective
To offer evidence that there has been research which has demonstrated your point
To use someone else's superior / authoritative way of explaining.
Drawing on Other People's Work in the body of your Writing: How?
Summarising
Distilling down someone else's ideas in your own words, always with a citation.
Paraphrasing
Explaining the exact details of someone's idea in your own words, always with a citation
Quoting
Using someone's exact words, always with quotation marks and a citation. Should not stand alone but should be introduced
Referencing is the process of
attributin
g information or ideas which you draw on in your work to their original source.

Referencing Style
Harvard
Style: Swinburne Library website http://www.swinburne.edu.au/lib/researchhelp/harvard_style.html

List of References
at the end, listed alphabetically

different info for different source types (e.g. book, edited collection, journal article)

but a standard book example is like this

Nicholas, L 2014,
Plagiarism Sucks
, Swinburne Press,
Melbourne.
download and print the quickguide PDF
Citation
this is a way to attribute ideas in the body of your
work to the author. it involves using this formula:

(Surname year, p.?)

e.g. (Nicholas 2014, p.1)
Referencing: What? How?
To avoid plagiarism, defined by Swinburne as

'the action or practice of taking and submitting or presenting the thoughts, writings or other work of someone else as though it is your own work'

Swinburne has very clear plagiarism information

Referencing: Why?
Plagiarism is a terrible idea! It can lose you your degree or job like this guy..... http://www.abc.net.au/mediawatch/transcripts/s3587199.htm

or this guy.... the FORMER president of Hungary

"The university said whole passages of his thesis about
the modern Olympic Games had been copied from the
work of two other academics." (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-17586128)

and more to the point, as experienced markers
we can tell
!!!!
Consequences of Plagiarism
Example of use of someone else's ideas
Taken from http://www.latrobe.edu.au/students/learning/allu-documents/Using-References-and-Evidence-to-Support-Your-Arguments-Edt.docx
Essay question
: Can anything be done to reduce student plagiarism?

Student's opinion
: Australian universities could teach students how to use citations in academic texts.

Takes a note from page 243 in an article written by Ranald Macdonald and Jude Carroll, ‘Plagiarism – a complex issue requiring a holistic institutional approach’ Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education Vol 31, No. 2, April 2006, pp233 - 425:

‘Institutions have a responsibility to put arrangements in place to support those still developing necessary skills.’

This is the researcher’s voice

How could the student use this in their essay?
Which is best?
Note from original: ‘Institutions have a responsibility to put arrangements in place to support those still developing necessary skills.’
1. Universities have a responsibility to put arrangements in place to support students still developing necessary skills, and I agree with this.

2. Institutions have a responsibility to put arrangements in place to support those still developing necessary skills and to teach students how to use citations in academic texts (Macdonald & Carroll, 2006, p.243).

3. Australian universities could teach students how to use citations in academic texts. Macdonald and Carroll (2006, p. 243) argue that, ‘Institutions have a responsibility to put arrangements in place to support those still developing necessary skills’.
1. This is plagiarism because

the student used some of the exact words of the original but did not cite
2. This is plagiarism because

even though the student has used a citation but has used the exact wording.
without quotation marks the reader would assume that this is the student's voice paraphrasing the author.
This is correct.
The student has stated their own position on the topic without citation, the reader is clear it is the student's voice.

The student has clearly introduced the quotation as someone else's conclusion to back up their own argument
Re-cap:

Women made up 58.2% of applications in Australia in 2012.

(DIICSRTE 2012)

So what are the differences? (You will need to look wider for statistics here, there are some relevant articles linked in the list of suggested readings)

The 2012 article ‘Gender and stereotypes in motivation to study computer programming for careers in multimedia’ (Doubé & Lang 2012) states that:

in the Faculty of Information and Communication Technologies at Swinburne in 2009, 17% of the students were women.

So there are differences in
type of courses
chosen according to gender.

Lets look at how these authors write about other sources......
Kinds of language to use when presenting someone else’s academic perspective
Doubé, W & Lang, C 2012, ‘Gender and stereotypes in motivation to study computer programming for careers in multimedia’, Computer Science Education, vol.22, no.1, pp.63-78.

Be
modest
about what any citation can claim. Do not state something as fact when it is perspective or interpretation or proposition.

Be sure to make it clear to the author what / whose source you are referring to at all times

Bring it back to your voice: explain what this means for your essay
Another Example: AAUW Report 'Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics'
This report is much like an essay which you will write in that it mostly uses other people's statistics and research, i.e. it is a discussion and
report on
the findings of secondary sources
.
But towards
new knowledge:
it has a clear research question.
Seeks reasons for at the root of the lower representation of women in these subject areas

http://www.aauw.org/learn/research/whysofew.cfm
Full transcript