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Carbon Monoxide

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Briana Giovanniello

on 15 February 2014

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Transcript of Carbon Monoxide

Carbon Monoxide
How does Carbon monoxide poisoning work and what does it do to the body?
Red blood cells pick up CO quicker than they pick up oxygen. If there is a lot of CO in the air, the body may replace oxygen in blood with CO. This blocks oxygen from getting into the body, which can damage tissues and result in death. CO can also combine with proteins in tissues, destroying the tissues and causing injury and death. The symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are headache, dizziness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, sleepiness, and confusion. If you suspect CO poisoning, get outside to fresh air immediately, and then call 911.
How does a CO detector work?
Carbon monoxide detectors trigger an alarm based on an accumulation of carbon monoxide over time. Detectors may be based on a chemical reaction causing a color change, an electrochemical reaction that produces current to trigger an alarm, or a semiconductor sensor that changes its electrical resistance in the presence of CO. There are different types of detectors depending on how the level of carbon monoxide is measured. You should Install battery-operated CO alarms or CO alarms with battery backup in your home outside separate sleeping areas.
Other safety measures that can be taken to avoid CO poisoning.
You can reduce your risk of carbon monoxide poisoning by keeping your fuel-burning appliances well maintained and using combustible fuels only in well ventilated areas. Have your home heating systems (including chimneys and vents) inspected and serviced annually by a trained service technician. Never use portable generators inside homes or garages, even if doors and windows are open. Use generators outside only, far away from the home. Never use a gas range or oven for heating.
Bibliography
http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Safety-Education/Safety-Education-Centers/Carbon-Monoxide-Information-Center/Protect-Your-Family-from-Carbon-Monoxide-Poisoning--/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide

http://www.epa.gov/airquality/carbonmonoxide/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide_detector
What produces Carbon Monoxide?
Carbon monoxide is a deadly, colorless, odorless, poisonous gas. It is produced by the incomplete burning of various fuels, including coal, wood, charcoal, oil, kerosene, propane, and natural gas.
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