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Parallel and Perpendicular Lines

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by

Asyndace Turner

on 4 October 2013

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Transcript of Parallel and Perpendicular Lines

A World Without Parallel and Perpendicular Lines
5 Things That Rely on Parallel Lines
1. A desk needs parallel lines because if the legs of a desk weren’t the same length, the desk would be uneven and you wouldn't be able to sit in a stable position.
2. The two sides of a zipper should be parallel because if the two sides were apart, you couldn’t zip your jacket.
3. A piece of notebook paper needs parallel lines because if not, then the margins wouldn’t be the same size.
4. The front and back covers of a binder need parallel lines because if the covers of binder were not parallel, then the top would be too big or too small, or the bottom would be too big or small.
5. The lines on a football field need to be parallel because if they weren’t, then the lines wouldn’t be equal distance apart.

5 Things That Rely on Perpendicular Lines
1. A diamond kite needs perpendicular lines because if the shape of the kite does not include a frame that makes perpendicular lines, then the kite could not fly.
2. The American Red Cross symbol needs to be perpendicular because they give the cross its definite shape.
3. A coordinate plane needs to be perpendicular because if it didn’t have perpendicular lines then the points you plot wouldn’t be accurate.
4. The American flag relies on perpendicular lines because if it didn’t have perpendicular lines, then it wouldn’t be the right shape.
5. Floor tiles rely on perpendicular lines because if they didn’t have perpendicular lines, then you couldn’t count how many feet you walk.

5 Things That Rely on both Parallel and Perpendicular Lines
1. A MacBook needs parallel and perpendicular lines because if there wasn’t a set way to make the screens, they couldn’t be mass-produced.
2. A roadway intersection needs to be parallel and perpendicular because the roads need to be equal distance apart and at right angles to avoid wrecks.
3. A bridge needs perpendicular and parallel lines because it must have the perpendicular bars to hold up the bridge, but the two sides of the bridge need to be equal distance apart.
4. A basketball backboard needs parallel and perpendicular lines because if the sides weren’t parallel or perpendicular, then the board wouldn’t be an equal size, and then it wouldn't be as useful.
5. Railroad tracks need to use parallel and perpendicular lines because if there weren’t parallel lines for the tracks and perpendicular lines for the support, then the train couldn’t run on the track.

A World Without Parallel or Perpendicular Lines
Subject: School
If the world did not have parallel and perpendicular lines, the walls in our school wouldn’t be made of an even amount of cement, and the windows wouldn’t be the same sizes. The staircases wouldn’t be equal distances apart, and each step would be a different size. The doors to the classroom would be an uneven distance apart, and the shape of every door would differ. Our desks would be uneven, and we would have trouble writing on them. The teacher’s boards would also be hard to write on because they would be turned in different directions and the teachers wouldn’t be able to write straight on them. Finally, our laptops wouldn’t be able to be mass produced and everyone’s laptop would function differently.
So, what would a world without parallel and perpendicular lines be like?
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