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Judaism: An Introduction

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by

Edward Smith

on 16 September 2013

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Transcript of Judaism: An Introduction

an ethnic religion?
a religious ethnicity?
covenant & submission - but communal primarily
any righteous person can be saved
but Jews have a special relationship and purpose
historical religion
Moses: the law
Scriptures
Prophets

Judaism: An Introduction
What is theTorah?
Pentateuch
sometimes the Hebrew Bible:
Tanakh
Torah
Prophets
Writings
Torah:
Genesis
Exodus
Leviticus
Numbers
Deuteronomy
Prophets:
Isaiah
Jeremiah
Ezekial
and others
Moses
or
10th-5th centuries BCE
memory vs. written record
TheWritings
psalms
proverbs
etc.
What is a book?
Genesis
creation of the universe
Adam & Eve & separation from God
Noah
The Hebrews
Authority
no central authority after 70 CE
Rabbinate
Midrash
Mishnah or Oral Torah
Talmud
Rabbis
chief purpose is interpretation of scripture
ceremony and ritual is done by ordinary Jews at home and at synagogue
application of the Torah to daily life in any period of history
Midrash
interpretation
collections of interpretations of the Torah
originally oral
came to be written down
some are line-by-line
others follow order of reading the Torah in worship
focuses on the Mitzvot - 613 rules
Mishnah or Oral Torah
further & separate commentaries on the Torah
arranged in categories
ca. 200 CE
Rabbi Judah haNasi [the Prince]
commentaries on his commentary and so on [glossing] 'Tannaim' or teachers: tannaitic
Talmud
http://people.ucalgary.ca/~elsegal/TalmudPage.html
Mysticism
regarded with suspicion
Kabbalah
Zohar - Book of Splendour
13th century ascribed to 2nd century
Moses de Leon
divine emanations
meditation + strict adherence to the law
http://people.ucalgary.ca/~elsegal/Sefirot/Sefirot.html
Types of Judaism
Hasidism
Reform
Orthodox
Conservative
Recontstructionist
Secular
Hasidism
pious & ecstatic
reaction to persecution in eastern Europe
Israel ben Eliezer or Baal Shem Tov: The Besht
joy
regarded with suspicion by Rabbis
accepted in 19th century
Haredi
Reform
local languages not Hebrew
women Rabbis
Orthodox
resist accommondation to the modern world
Haredim
Conservative
the middle path
mostly the U.S.
Reconstructionist
1930s
reject faith
follow the Law
Secular
ethnic Jews
Ritual
Prayer 3 times a day
synagogue prayer
minyan
prayer shawls
skullcaps: kippah or yarmulke
tefillin
the day: sunset to sunset
Hear O Israel, the Lord God is One
Rosh Hashanah
Yom Kippur
Passover
Israel
Talmud
two large commentaries on the Mishnah
each includes the Mishnah in Hebrew
plus a 'gemarahh or 'completion' in Aramaic
halakha - legal
moral lessons which also refers to the Midrash
two:
Babylonian
Palestinian
http://www.cbc.ca/thesundayedition/shows/2012/01/08/mommy-bloggers---israels-rosa-parks---whither-the-liberals/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6y_GNP6fW-c
http://www.pewforum.org/global-religious-landscape-exec.aspx
The second book Exodus is the story of Moses, the formation of the covenant, the reception of the ten commandments and of the Torah.

The third book, Leviticus is the story of the rituals and rules the Hebrews must follow to remain faithful.

The fourth book, Numbers is the story of the Hebrews move towards the promised land, Canaan, and the times they sinned as a people and individually, preventing them from entering.

The fifth book, Deuteronomy is the story the arrival of the Hebrews at the cusp of entering the promised land, and the final promulgation of the laws that bind them to God and to each other. Moses sees the promised land but never enters.
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