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Idiots guide to Slang and Filipinisms

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Kateleen Hatico

on 22 June 2014

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Transcript of Idiots guide to Slang and Filipinisms

Yipeee!!
Idiot's guide
and
to
Filipinisms
SlanG
Slang
-Words that are not a part of standard vocabulary or language and are used informally are called slang. These words are mostly used in speech rather than in writing.
-Slang can be divided into four different types; country slang, urban slang, gay slang and common slang. Country slang is used by those who are in the rural parts of a country, while urban slang is spoken by those from the city or by African-Americans. Gay slang is used by gays, bisexual, homosexuals or transsexuals. Common slang is used by almost everybody.
18 Karat
1.
--- All the way, full out.
ex. Hey, "baby," I got some bread, lets paint the town.
ex. The Duke is a classy guy, his heart is "18 karat."
Air-check
ex. Did you hear the "air-check" of Billie Holiday with Gerry Mulligan?
Apple
ex. We got a gig up in the "Apple" at Minton's with Diz and Bird.
Axe
ex. Hey, Jack, bring your "axe" over tomorrow and we'll jam.
Baby
5.
2.
3.
4.
--- A recording of a radio or television performance.
--- New York city. This is now common usage.
--- An instrument.
--- A term of endearment.
6.
Bad
10.
Barrelhouse
--- was the colloquial term for a cabaret in New Orleans where liquor was served. Barrelhouse music is the type of music played in one of these cabarets.
--- Good.
ex. Hey, Man, I dig this "barrelhouse" music. It flows free.
ex. That dude Wynton Marsalis does some "bad" ass playin'.
7.
Bag
--- A person's particular interest.
ex. I'd like to play with your combo, dude, but your sound just ain't my "bag.".
8.
Balloon lungs
--- A brass man with plenty of wind.
ex. That cat must have "balloon lungs," Stix said he held that note for three and half minutes!"
9.
Barn Burner
--- Originally in Sinatra slang this was a stylish, classy woman, but today, it can even be applied to a good football game.
ex. Hey, Quincy, did you see Stella over at the diner? Man, she is one amazing "barn burner."
15.
Bomb
--- Very cool.
ex. The Crusader's new disc, "Louisiana Hot Sauce" is the "bomb."
11.
Beat
--- Exhausted or tired.
ex. Man, we been blowin' all night. I'm really "beat."
12.
Birdbrain
--- A Charlie Parker imitator.
ex. It's 1957 already. We need something new. I'm gettin' tired of all of the "Birdbrains" around these days..
13.
--- A jazzman's term for playing any instrument.
Blow
ex. That European guy, Django Reinhardt, can really "blow."
14.
Blow your top
--- A phrase which expresses enthusiasm or exasperation.
ex. Hey man, I know it's tough, but don't "blow your top."
20.
Bring Down or Bringdown
--- As a verb - to depress. As a noun - one who depresses.
ex. Hey, man, don't "bring me down" with all of this crazy talk.
Hey, let's get out of here, that guy is a real "bringdown."
16.
Boogie Man
--- In the jazz slanguage of 1935, this was a critic.
ex. Roscoe just waxed a great disc and the "boogie man" gave it a bad review.
17.
--- An early piano blues form that was popularized in Chicago. The term has sexual overtones.
Boogie Woogie
18.
Bose Bouncing
--- To play notes so low as to bounce a Bose speaker from its foundation.
ex. Hey, Lester, dig that "boogie woogie" that Yancy is layin' down.
19.
ex. I'm sorry, my bass player was just "Bose bouncing.
Bread
--- A jazzman's word for money.
ex. Alright, Jack, if ya want me to play, ya gotta come up with some "bread."
25.
Changes
21.
Bug
--- To annoy or bewilder.
ex. Man, don't "bug" me with that jive about cleanin' up my act.
22.
Burnin
--- Used to describe a particularly emotional or technically excellent solo.
ex. Hey, man, did you hear that solo by Lee? It was "burnin."
23.
Cans
--- Headphones.
ex. That last take was really kickin', put on the "cans" and lets record the final take.
24.
Cats
--- Folks who play jazz music.
ex. I used to partake in late-night jam sessions with the "cats" over at Sid's.
--- Chord progression.
ex. Hey, Pops, dig those "changes" that the Hawk is playin'.
30.
Clams
--- Mistakes while playing music.
26.
Character
--- An interesting, out of the ordinary person.
ex. Sonny is certainly a "character".
ex. Charlie is really layin' down some "clams" tonight.
27.
Chick
--- A young and pretty girl.
ex. Hey, Buster, leave it alone. That "chick" is outta your league.
28.
Chill 'ya
--- When an unusual "hot" passion gives you goose pimples.
ex. Gee, Jody, doesn't it "chill 'ya" the way Benny plays the clarinet?
29.
Chops
--- The ability to play an instrument, a highly refined technique. Also refers to a brass players facial muscles.
ex. "He played the hell out of that Gershwin; he's sure got chops." and "My chops are still achin' from last nights gig."
35.
Crazy
--- Another jazz superlative.
31.
Clinker
--- A bad note or one that is fluffed.
ex. Hey, Charlie, that was some "clinker" that you just hit.
ex. Count Basie's band sure lays down a "crazy" beat.
32.
Combo
--- Combination of musicians that varies in size from 3 to 10.
33.
ex. Here me talkin' to ya Lester. Did you see that supreme "combo" that the Hawk put together?
Cool
--- A restrained approach to music. A superlative which has gained wide acceptance outside of jazz.
ex. That cat Miles Davis plays some "cool" jazz. That cat Miles, is "cool."
34.
Corny, Cornball
--- A jazz man's term for trite, sweet or stale.
ex. Man, Guy Lombardo is one "corny" cat. Man, Guy Lombardo plays some "cornball" music.
40.
Dig
--- To know or understand completely.
ex. Hey, dad, I been listenin' to what you been doin' and I "dig" that crazy music.
36.
Crib
--- Same as pad.
ex. Hey, baby, come on up to my crib awhile and relax.
37.
Crumb
--- Someone for whom it is impossible to show respect.
ex. Sleazy Eddie is a real "crumb."
38.
Cut
--- To leave or depart. Also to completely outdo another person or group in a battle of the bands.
ex. Hey, man, did you see the way that two-bit band "cut" when Basie "cut" them last night.
39.
Dark
--- Angry or upset (used in the Midwest).
ex. Joe was in a real "dark" mood after Jaco showed up 30 minutes late for the gig.
This term refers to the wrong way Filipinos use the English language. Usually, Filipinisms result from the literal translation of words from the native tongue to English, with the famous example patayin mo ang ilaw to kill the lights, or it could be that the use resulted to replacing the correct word or words with similar sounding/spelling words.
Filipinism
WHy It's Wrong
It's Better to Say
As per Paul, all request forms should be signed by him.
Bottomless
As to the project…
Anything?
Actually

Term not recognized in American/British English

Commonly used filler, or used as an answer to replace “yes”
Sounds vague
Incomplete sentence
Inappropriate term (“as to”)
Refillable

Word should be used to explain a justification of a different thought or a known fact - The boss is actually very lenient. / Nobody knows what actually caused the fight at the party.
Is there anything I can do for you? / How may I help you?
As per Paul’s instructions, all request forms should be signed by him.
Regarding the project…
Filipinism
Why it's wrong
It's Better to Say
C.R. / comfort room
Dine in/Take home (when ordering food)
Come again?
Could you repeat that again, please?
Currently, I live there right now.
Term misuse

Mistaken as a sexually explicit term (‘cum again’)
Redundant (“repeat” and “again”), inappropriate use of “please” in a sentence that is obviously a command
Redundant (“currently” and “right now”)
Word not found in the English dictionary
For here/To go

I’m sorry I didn’t get quite get that / Excuse me? / I’m sorry would you please say that again?
Could you repeat that?
Currently, I live there. / I live there right now.
restroom, powder room, bathroom, toilet
Filipinism
Why It's Wrong
It's Better to Say
Hand carry
Fall in line
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He was salvaged.
Misuse of the word “salvaged”, which means saving something from being destroyed

Term not recognized in American/British English
“Fill up” means pouring something until completely filled
Preposition use
Term not recognized in American/British English
Get into line / Line up / Make a line
He was assassinated.

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Carry-on luggage
Filipinism
Why It's Wrong
It's Better to say
Hold your line/For a while…
I felt kind of tired.

I’ll ask her an apology.
I commute to work every day. Getting a car is just too expensive, not to mention fuel too.
I failed in Accent training.
Sounds absurd (Hold your line), Caller would expect a longer waiting time (for a while)
Inappropriate term (“kind of”)

Confusing/illogical
Misuse of the word “commute”, which means to travel to a certain place on a regular basis regardless of the vehicle
Inappropriate use of “in”
Would you mind if I put you on hold for a second? / Please hold
I felt rather tired.

I’ll apologize to her. / I should make an apology.
I commute to work either by car or bus.
I failed accent training.
Filipinism
Why It's Wrong
It's Better to Say
Open/close (for appliances, office equipment and lights)

I talked to her already.
It’s for free
It’s traffic today.
My brother is taking up law.
It’s like referring to an item for repair

Misplaced adverb, used as filler and “talked” sounds too informal
Inappropriate word use (for)
Misuse of the word “traffic”
Use of “up” too casual
Turn on/off

I already spoke with her. / I have already spoken to her.
It’s free. / It’s free of charge. / We’re sending it to you for free.
Traffic is heavy.
My brother is taking law. / My brother is studying law.
Filipinism
Why It's wrong
It's Better to say
Oppositor
Pass by my office before you go.
Sewer
Term not recognized in American/British English
Inappropriate word choice (“pass”)
Term not recognized in American/British English
Senatoriable
Term not recognized in American/British English
She delivered her baby yesterday.

Subject-verb confusion

She had her baby yesterday. / Dr. Smith delivered her baby.

Opposition member
Drop by my office before you go.
Tailor (male) or seamstress (female)
Senatorial candidate
Filipinism
Why It's Wrong
It's Better to Say
Thank you for that/this one.
Tuck out
Sounds confusing and impolite
Term not recognized in American/British English
Thank you for the information. / Thank you.
Untuck
This shop repairs cars/cellphones.
We have one participant.
Where do you go to school? / What school do you go to?

Word choice (“studying”) is too casual

Redundant term (“one only”)
Sounds unprofessional, too inviting
We accept repairs.
We have one participant only.
Where are you studying?

Filipinism
Why It's Wrong
It's Better To Say
Yes, I’ll wait. (in response to “Do you mind waiting?”)

Xerox (action word)
It’s a brand of photocopying machine
Confusing mainly because of the “YES” word

No, not at all. / No, I don’t mind at all.

Photocopy
The reason why...is because...
redundant
"The reason is that..." or "It is because...".
“next next week”
redundant
“two weeks from now” or “week after next”
“last last week”
redundant
“two weeks ago” or “week before last”
FIN
Group Members:
Mildan John Romero
Kateleen Marie Hatico
Jasper Fernandez
Nikki Vergara
Myrene Maddara
Full transcript